Hot-Take Media Incapable of Covering Coronavirus

 

The latest tax cut “would kill 10,000 people annually.” Net Neutrality was going to “end the internet as we know it.” False charges of Russian collusion were promoted with daily cable news “blockbusters” that it was “the beginning of the end” and the “walls were closing in.”

Our hot-take media survives on internet clicks and 15-minute windows of TV viewership. The easiest way to play that game is to present everything as a crisis. A slow news week doesn’t slow down the “breaking news” crawl warning of the latest way the world will end. Climate change, a local election, and that joke the comedian told on Netflix doom our society and you need to keep watching to find out how long we have left.

Then, an actual crisis comes. Coronavirus, for instance. A rapidly spreading pandemic that has killed thousands in China and Italy and is now appearing on our shores. The good news for talking heads is that they have actual information to provide to viewers. They don’t need to hype, embellish, or exaggerate. Just report the latest data, transmit important statements from medical experts and political leaders, and share safety tips.

But no.

Our hot-take media has replaced boring play-by-play coverage with wall-to-wall color commentary. Their ability to calmly report facts has atrophied. Instead, it’s good vs. evil and Republicans always get the black hats.

As reports of COVID-19 emerged out of Wuhan, President Trump was attacked for his “xenophobic” travel restrictions from China. Today, he’s attacked for saying that the virus started in Wuhan. His national address last night was calm, sober, and non-partisan. While he spoke, journalists across Twitter railed against his “stupid” overreaction to restrict travel from the European Union. Then they insisted it wasn’t nearly enough. It seems everything the government does is too much or too little — often both at the same time.

Today, social media was even uglier. Biden and Bernie were praised for taking partisan shots at Trump in their speeches. When Trump replied in kind, he was savaged for being partisan. Oh, and racist. Because, black hat.

In an actual crisis, we need calm, sobriety, and caution. Add in some rigid analysis that inspires effective action rather than panic, rage, or despair. Instead, we have Don Lemon screeching at John Kasich for being too in the bag for Trump. Peggy Noonan advising Americans to panic. David Brooks collapsing in his Manhattan penthouse and weeping into his inhaler.

Serious times require a serious media, but mainstream journalists are no longer interested in that role. All they have are dunks on Trump, hysterical headlines, and hot takes all the way down.

If you’re interested, I wrote a more sober assessment for the local paper a couple of days ago, just posted this morning. Unfortunately, it’s factual and calm, so I won’t be getting that Manhattan penthouse anytime soon.

 

Published in Healthcare, Politics
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  1. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker
    @JennaStocker

    I’ve likened this to the what we call meteorologists here in MN: weather terrorists, especially for winter snowstorms. Any chance of snow is preceded by a week long hype of “The Big One” that causes everyone to raid the grocery stores of food (and yes, toilet paper), hardwares of shovels & salt, and the oldsters clearing the shelves of the pet store where I work of cans of cat food. Guess what, we survive. All the crisis fear-mongering makes us question if the next one is cause for concern or not. For this coronavirus situation, we’ve heard for four straight years how we were going to die in WWIII, be sold to Russia, or hated by the Canadians. When any crisis is tainted by politics, it trivializes the seriousness of both the situation and the media. If the left prioritizes scoring political points (calling Wuhan racist) over public safety I question their seriousness. People don’t get coronavirus immunity cards for winning the most political points. They talk about needing adults in charge, well they can start with putting some in newsrooms.

    • #1
  2. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    It’s not just them being hot-take media people. It’s being hot-take media people on news channels and in publications that no longer even care about making an attempt to attract a cross-section of viewers ideologically, but instead have decided in the era of thousands of cable, satellite and streaming video broadcast options, they’re going to try and hold onto a smaller niche audience by playing to their biases and giving them what they want.

    That’s how you get Don Lemon yelling at John Kasich for not being mean enough to Donald Trump on his handling of the coronavirus. CNN brought Kasich on thinking because of his past history with Trump, he’d give their audience the gratuitous Trump-bashing they wanted, and Lemon became upset when Kasich failed to go into full Rick Wilson mode.

    It’s the same thing with MSNBC or even outlets like The New York Times. The goal is to retain the core audience in any way possible, so when you have a president the viewers of those networks don’t like, the hot takes are all going to be directed toward ramping up the hysteria, because they hope it will both get their core viewers to tune in and — they hope — since it’s a major news story, others will also tune in and fall for the hype and turn against Trump because all of America should be in full vapors mode, like Don Lemon.

    • #2
  3. Gossamer Cat Coolidge
    Gossamer Cat
    @GossamerCat

    For this outbreak, I read my local newspaper and read notifications from my academic institution.  I have tuned out the national media pretty much altogether. I am sick of commentary. I don’t want commentary, I want news.  A few years ago, I stopped watching sports shows because all they did was speculate on who was going to win what game and what season. If I just watched the games, I would find out so why was I bothering to listen to endless speculation?

    • #3
  4. Cow Girl Thatcher
    Cow Girl
    @CowGirl

    I can no longer watch any television news in real time. None of them. It is so utterly NOT “news” but always opinion about whatever current event is in discussion. I mostly experience some of these unbelievable partisan attacks because I catch a snippet of a video here on Ricochet or read a piece of Powerline Blog, and follow a link, or hear it from a radio commentator.

    Today, I was driving around doing errands after work, and I was treated to Don Lemon’s immature, toddler-like tantrum with his “guest” Gov. Kasich via a radio talk show. I was astonished! Granted, Don Lemon isn’t exactly known for his even-tempered delivery of the facts, but WOW!! That three minutes was…was…well.

    I’d just spent six and a half hours in a classroom of 1st graders, and I felt like they had been much more well-behaved. Donnie-baby needs a serious time-out! He wouldn’t have earned any behavior tickets today! He and his mom need a conference with the principal.

    Good grief.

    • #4
  5. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker
    @JennaStocker

    Cow Girl (View Comment):
    Good grief.

    Amen!

    • #5
  6. Mike Rapkoch Moderator
    Mike Rapkoch
    @MikeRapkoch

    Modern journalists:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EtA0HrUrYM

    • #6
  7. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    I am more likely to ask Brian Williams for help with my taxes than to ask Don Lemon for his opinion about anything.

    • #7
  8. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    When every event heralds the end of the world, then no event heralds the end of the world.  That is the box that the media have put themselves in with their relentless hysteria about absolutely everything from a six-inch snowstorm to coronavirus.

    Meanwhile, in the UK, the chief science advisor to Boris Johnson (he’s a doctor, and has also been the head of research at GlaxoSmithKline), has a contrarian viewpoint, and is talking about how we might need to develop “herd immunity” to this particular coronavirus, and how herd immunity works (he says some other things too, but I expect reaction will be focused on this part).  Should be interesting to see if the media reacts to this in any other way than to say that Sir Patrick is calling for people to die: https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-millions-of-britons-will-need-to-contract-covid-19-for-herd-immunity-11956793

    • #8
  9. Ralphie Inactive
    Ralphie
    @Ralphie

    I am becoming  confused by reading multiple predictions, etc. that I’m starting to think no one really knows what will happen, so the sky is falling is the safe bet; the exposure is exponential and will overwhelm the medical community.  I can’t help but wonder if all the hand washing, sanitizer, staying home, stores sending me emails how they are keeping stores clean, etc. won’t help drive the regular flu down and help make room in the medical community for this new virus.  Less people out driving, less accidents, etc.  The figures I see add this virus on top of the current seasonal flu. I don’t know. I know that in calculating a load on a deck, I can use snow load or people load but don’t need to use both because people generally don’t have a deck load of people in the middle of a snow storm.

    I suspect the truth will be a middle ground. 

     

    • #9
  10. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Yesterday, Rush made a very good comparison between the coronavirus and the Swine Flu of 2009-10.  The Swine Flu was significantly more severe.  If you take away the nursing home deaths in Washington State, the US death rate is incredibly small.

    Although the coronavirus has yet to run its course, my guess is it will fall well below the numbers for all the other named diseases we’ve had the last couple of decades except for Ebola.  I also predict we’ll look back and ask ourselves, “Was canceling all those sporting events worth it?”

    • #10
  11. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    Stad (View Comment):

    Yesterday, Rush made a very good comparison between the coronavirus and the Swine Flu of 2009-10. The Swine Flu was significantly more severe. If you take away the nursing home deaths in Washington State, the US death rate is incredibly small.

    Although the coronavirus has yet to run its course, my guess is it will fall well below the numbers for all the other named diseases we’ve had the last couple of decades except for Ebola. I also predict we’ll look back and ask ourselves, “Was canceling all those sporting events worth it?”

    I could see this going 4-6 weeks and getting through April. But if we get to May, the weather’s finally getting warmer everywhere and the media’s started to list anyone dying as having died from coronavirus in order to maintain the hysteria (“Eight more coronavirus victims at nursing home die in fire….“), then people are just going to get annoyed and impatient to get back to their regular lives.

    • #11
  12. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Ralphie (View Comment):

    I am becoming confused by reading multiple predictions, etc. that I’m starting to think no one really knows what will happen, so the sky is falling is the safe bet; the exposure is exponential and will overwhelm the medical community. I can’t help but wonder if all the hand washing, sanitizer, staying home, stores sending me emails how they are keeping stores clean, etc. won’t help drive the regular flu down and help make room in the medical community for this new virus. Less people out driving, less accidents, etc. The figures I see add this virus on top of the current seasonal flu. I don’t know. I know that in calculating a load on a deck, I can use snow load or people load but don’t need to use both because people generally don’t have a deck load of people in the middle of a snow storm.

    I suspect the truth will be a middle ground.

     

    “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.”

    — Yogi Berra

    • #12
  13. MichaelKennedy Inactive
    MichaelKennedy
    @MichaelKennedy

    The advent of cable news pretty much set up the present nonsense.  CNN, especially, needs  eyeballs and the Malaysian airliner was good for several weeks.  Trump has been a godsend for them the past four years but they have alienated half their audience by the bias.  At least it wasn’t particularly dangerous but this is.

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2020/03/wuhan-virus-watch-dr-fauci-cautions-against-a-hyped-up-75-150-million-coronavirus-case-estimate/

    Typically, it was the Representative from the Palestinians who tried to get this going with someone who knows better.

    Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., asked Fauci about the estimate during a congressional hearing.

    “Earlier this week, Congress’ attending physician told the Senate that he expects between 70 to 150 million people to contract the coronavirus in the United States,” said Tlaib, referring to figures reported by Axios on Wednesday. “Dr. Fauci, is he wrong?”

    Yes.

    • #13
  14. Gossamer Cat Coolidge
    Gossamer Cat
    @GossamerCat

    She (View Comment):
    Meanwhile, in the UK, the chief science advisor to Boris Johnson (he’s a doctor, and has also been the head of research at GlaxoSmithKline), has a contrarian viewpoint, and is talking about how we might need to develop “herd immunity” to this particular coronavirus, and how herd immunity works (he says some other things too, but I expect reaction will be focused on this part). Should be interesting to see if the media reacts to this in any other way than to say that Sir Patrick is calling for people to die: https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-millions-of-britons-will-need-to-contract-covid-19-for-herd-immunity-11956793

    Was just discussing this with some colleagues.  I asked whether our response to this new virus, given that 80% of cases are mild, is going to ensure that we’re going to go through the same thing next year and the year after that, because we are not going to develop immunity through exposure.  

    • #14
  15. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    Seen today on Facebook: “Trump lied, people died.”

    • #15
  16. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Seen today on Facebook: “Trump lied, people died.”

    Gary, I think the Trump-haters have been posting that on Facebook since 1/20/17.

    • #16
  17. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Seen today on Facebook: “Trump lied, people died.”

    Glory Be, Gary.  What would you prefer?  Something like “Obama did nothing: 60.8 million infected, more that 12,000 died,” as was true in 2009 with the “swine flu” epidemic.

    Note that I’m not criticizing Obama, or the lack of panic in response to the swine flu pandemic here.  I’m just commenting on a reaction in response to a stimulus.

    Why give these ridiculous memes oxygen by repeating them?

    • #17
  18. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    MichaelKennedy (View Comment):

    The advent of cable news pretty much set up the present nonsense. CNN, especially, needs eyeballs and the Malaysian airliner was good for several weeks. Trump has been a godsend for them the past four years but they have alienated half their audience by the bias. At least it wasn’t particularly dangerous but this is.

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2020/03/wuhan-virus-watch-dr-fauci-cautions-against-a-hyped-up-75-150-million-coronavirus-case-estimate/

    Typically, it was the Representative from the Palestinians who tried to get this going with someone who knows better.

    Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., asked Fauci about the estimate during a congressional hearing.

    “Earlier this week, Congress’ attending physician told the Senate that he expects between 70 to 150 million people to contract the coronavirus in the United States,” said Tlaib, referring to figures reported by Axios on Wednesday. “Dr. Fauci, is he wrong?”

    Yes.

    If CNN had any shame, their reporter breathlessly asking Trump last week if he had muzzled Dr. Fauci from telling the truth about coronoavirus, with Dr. Fauci standing next to Trump at the press conference, would have done it. But they don’t, so nothing is immune to over-hype. The only question is how long can they and other outlets keep it up if the numbers that are hypotheticals now don’t start showing up for real by at least mid-April?

    • #18
  19. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    She (View Comment):

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Seen today on Facebook: “Trump lied, people died.”

    Glory Be, Gary. What would you prefer? Something like “Obama did nothing: 60.8 million infected, more that 12,000 died,” as was true in 2009 with the “swine flu” epidemic.

    Note that I’m not criticizing Obama, or the lack of panic in response to the swine flu pandemic here. I’m just commenting on a reaction in response to a stimulus.

    Why give these ridiculous memes oxygen by repeating them?

    We all know the answer, which is in 2009, the media was still all invested in framing Obama as the infallible God-King — hyping H1N1 might have helped them in the push to pass ObamaCare, but not at the expense of making Obama look uncaring or ineffectual. So 10 1/2 years ago, it was in the media’s self-interest to downplay the outbreak and the threat from Swine Flu, even though by then the current positions and target audiences of all the major media players as they are in 2020 were already in place.

    There were several other major events during the Obama years, like the Mississippi Delta flooding, where the media chose not to hype the story for ratings, because of the message that hyping the story would have sent to viewers and readers. So they very much can control themselves when they want to, but in the current case, it’s in their self-interest to try and hype coronoavirus as much as possible, due to the hoped-for effects on Trump’s re-election chances (and to where even if we don’t get 2-4 percent of the U.S. population dead, the hope is the economy tanks for the fall general election).

    • #19
  20. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: Peggy Noonan advising Americans to panic.

    Is this not a crime akin to inciting a riot?

    • #20
  21. DonG (skeptic) Coolidge
    DonG (skeptic)
    @DonG

    I was thinking about this the other day.  We use so much network bandwidth to these talking heads and yet they are not able to offer useful information.  What would it take?   I am sure it would be bad for viewership, but they could spend time interviewing exports and historians.  Perhaps they could spend money and hire researchers that are able to prepare useful information and talking heads to could revert to old-school news readers.  I don’t think the “hot take” media is self-aware enough to recognize the need for change.

    • #21
  22. aardo vozz Member
    aardo vozz
    @aardovozz

    Mike Rapkoch (View Comment):

    Modern journalists:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EtA0HrUrYM

    Respectfully disagree. The clip shows too much restraint. 

    <sarcasm off >

    <cynicism always on >

    • #22
  23. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Jon1979 (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    Yesterday, Rush made a very good comparison between the coronavirus and the Swine Flu of 2009-10. The Swine Flu was significantly more severe. If you take away the nursing home deaths in Washington State, the US death rate is incredibly small.

    Although the coronavirus has yet to run its course, my guess is it will fall well below the numbers for all the other named diseases we’ve had the last couple of decades except for Ebola. I also predict we’ll look back and ask ourselves, “Was canceling all those sporting events worth it?”

    I could see this going 4-6 weeks and getting through April. But if we get to May, the weather’s finally getting warmer everywhere and the media’s started to list anyone dying as having died from coronavirus in order to maintain the hysteria (“Eight more coronavirus victims at nursing home die in fire….“), then people are just going to get annoyed and impatient to get back to their regular lives.

    When I read the Masters has been postponed, I hope that means maybe it will be held when the hysteria has died down.  It’s the single biggest source of externally generated revenue for the CSRA (Central Savannah River Area) . . .

    • #23
  24. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    Stad (View Comment):

    Jon1979 (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    Yesterday, Rush made a very good comparison between the coronavirus and the Swine Flu of 2009-10. The Swine Flu was significantly more severe. If you take away the nursing home deaths in Washington State, the US death rate is incredibly small.

    Although the coronavirus has yet to run its course, my guess is it will fall well below the numbers for all the other named diseases we’ve had the last couple of decades except for Ebola. I also predict we’ll look back and ask ourselves, “Was canceling all those sporting events worth it?”

    I could see this going 4-6 weeks and getting through April. But if we get to May, the weather’s finally getting warmer everywhere and the media’s started to list anyone dying as having died from coronavirus in order to maintain the hysteria (“Eight more coronavirus victims at nursing home die in fire….“), then people are just going to get annoyed and impatient to get back to their regular lives.

    When I read the Masters has been postponed, I hope that means maybe it will be held when the hysteria has died down. It’s the single biggest source of externally generated revenue for the CSRA (Central Savannah River Area) . . .

    It’s going to be interesting to see how this plays out economically, once the current situation is over and if we don’t see 1-3 million deaths (where the absolute worst-case numbers being thrown about Thursday, with 150 million cases and a 4 percent death rate, would produce a Holocaust-level number of 6 million dead in the United States this year).

    In most recessions you have a situation where businesses are seeking demand, but there’s not enough supply, where here it’s that demand isn’t being met for precautionary health reasons (i.e. — People would pay the prices to go to March Madness, but there’s no March Madness). If this is resolved in 4-6 weeks, there could be a lot of pent-up demand released.

    • #24
  25. Rightfromthestart Coolidge
    Rightfromthestart
    @Rightfromthestart

    Ever wonder why people buy new shovels for every snowstorm? I generally buy the reusable kind. 

    The Journo-list Democrat/Media complex has decided that ‘botched Corona response’ is the big lie for this season, no matter how it turns out or what he does that’s what your grandchildren will learn in school along with Katrina, Ferguson, Travon, I can see Russia,  and a thousand other fictions. 

    • #25
  26. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Stad (View Comment):

    Yesterday, Rush made a very good comparison between the coronavirus and the Swine Flu of 2009-10. The Swine Flu was significantly more severe. If you take away the nursing home deaths in Washington State, the US death rate is incredibly small.

    Although the coronavirus has yet to run its course, my guess is it will fall well below the numbers for all the other named diseases we’ve had the last couple of decades except for Ebola. I also predict we’ll look back and ask ourselves, “Was canceling all those sporting events worth it?”

    It’s impossible to know for sure if things might have gone much worse, without some of these “over-reactions.”

    I’m reminded of the ho-hum hindsight reactions to Y2K.  But it’s quite possible that there could have been a lot of problems, if a lot of work hadn’t been done to avoid them, due to the “over-reaction.”

    Was it really worth the cost of housing codes leaning towards fire prevention?  After all, there haven’t been all that many houses destroyed and people killed in house fires…

    Well, uhhh….

    • #26
  27. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    There’s a really good article on City Journal.

    Today, thanks to vaccines, fewer and fewer people remember what it was like to survive a succession of childhood diseases. Is the unfamiliar threat of serious sickness making us more afraid of COVID-19 than we need to be? Does a society that relies more on politics than faith now find itself in an uncomfortable bind, unable to lecture, browbeat, intimidate, or evade the incorrect behavior of a dangerous microbe?

    • #27
  28. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    She (View Comment):

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Seen today on Facebook: “Trump lied, people died.”

    Glory Be, Gary. What would you prefer? Something like “Obama did nothing: 60.8 million infected, more that 12,000 died,” as was true in 2009 with the “swine flu” epidemic.

    Note that I’m not criticizing Obama, or the lack of panic in response to the swine flu pandemic here. I’m just commenting on a reaction in response to a stimulus.

    Why give these ridiculous memes oxygen by repeating them?

    Obama declared a national emergency after 1000 people died, yet Trump’s response is inadequate.  No one under 50 in the US has died from the virus.  I realize there’s a “yet” attached to the end of the sentence, but I hope my point is made.  Let us geezers decide if we want to go to a ball game or not . . .

    • #28
  29. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    Yesterday, Rush made a very good comparison between the coronavirus and the Swine Flu of 2009-10. The Swine Flu was significantly more severe. If you take away the nursing home deaths in Washington State, the US death rate is incredibly small.

    Although the coronavirus has yet to run its course, my guess is it will fall well below the numbers for all the other named diseases we’ve had the last couple of decades except for Ebola. I also predict we’ll look back and ask ourselves, “Was canceling all those sporting events worth it?”

    It’s impossible to know for sure if things might have gone much worse, without some of these “over-reactions.”

    I’m reminded of the ho-hum hindsight reactions to Y2K. But it’s quite possible that there could have been a lot of problems, if a lot of work hadn’t been done to avoid them, due to the “over-reaction.”

    Was it really worth the cost of housing codes leaning towards fire prevention? After all, there haven’t been all that many houses destroyed and people killed in house fires…

    Well, uhhh….

    I don’t think the fire code thing is a valid comparison.  The Y2K is a better one.

    The bottom line is to be prepared, take action when necessary, but do not panic.  When people panic, they abandon good judgment and make rash decisions, usually the wrong ones.  This time, the panic is media induced and the flames fanned by the Democrat party, all with one goal in mind – hurt Trump.  Think about it . . . a political party (the Democrats) and a business sector (the MSM) would bring a multi-trillion dollar economy to a grinding halt because they don’t agree with the voters’ choice of President.

    • #29
  30. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Stad (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    Although the coronavirus has yet to run its course, my guess is it will fall well below the numbers for all the other named diseases we’ve had the last couple of decades except for Ebola. I also predict we’ll look back and ask ourselves, “Was canceling all those sporting events worth it?”

    It’s impossible to know for sure if things might have gone much worse, without some of these “over-reactions.”

    I’m reminded of the ho-hum hindsight reactions to Y2K. But it’s quite possible that there could have been a lot of problems, if a lot of work hadn’t been done to avoid them, due to the “over-reaction.”

    Was it really worth the cost of housing codes leaning towards fire prevention? After all, there haven’t been all that many houses destroyed and people killed in house fires…

    Well, uhhh….

    I don’t think the fire code thing is a valid comparison. The Y2K is a better one.

    The bottom line is to be prepared, take action when necessary, but do not panic. When people panic, they abandon good judgment and make rash decisions, usually the wrong ones. This time, the panic is media induced and the flames fanned by the Democrat party, all with one goal in mind – hurt Trump. Think about it . . . a political party (the Democrats) and a business sector (the MSM) would bring a multi-trillion dollar economy to a grinding halt because they don’t agree with the voters’ choice of President.

    I think they’re both valid, although it’s unlikely anyone would have died from Y2K.  The point is the same: few people die in house fires BECAUSE the fire codes exist, and Y2K was “a snore” (in part) BECAUSE “panic” led to preparation.  Y2K was not “a snore” because it was always going to be “a snore” no matter what.  It was largely “a snore” because a lot of testing, preparation, and repair WAS DONE.

    But the political motivation in the current situation is worse.

    • #30