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Saturday’s Wall Street Journal has a long story on life for the passengers and crew aboard the quarantined cruise ship Diamond Princess which is docked at Yokohama. Interesting story but this is definitely the best paragraph:

Ellis Vincent, a 76-year old retired airline executive from Sydney, Australia, said he has spent more time than customary conversing with his wife while cooped up inside. She has an excellent memory, he said: “She is able to bring up every transgression I’ve ever had. I believe she is not finished”.

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  1. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Sounds kinda like Sartre’s No Exit; living in a single room with his wife and mother-in-law whose constant bickering was his vision of hell.

    • #1
    • February 15, 2020, at 2:01 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  2. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… Thatcher

    Jim McConnell (View Comment):

    Sounds kinda like Sartre’s No Exit; living in a single room with his wife and mother-in-law whose constant bickering was his vision of hell.

    There may be fatalities on the ship that have nothing to do with the coronavirus!

    • #2
    • February 15, 2020, at 2:07 PM PST
    • 11 likes
  3. ctlaw Coolidge

    How long until the dueling Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu movies?

    • #3
    • February 15, 2020, at 3:54 PM PST
    • Like
  4. Jon1979 Lincoln

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…: Ellis Vincent, a 76-year old retired airline executive from Sydney, Australia, said he has spent more time than customary conversing with his wife while cooped up inside. She has an excellent memory, he said: “She is able to bring up every transgression I’ve ever had. I believe she is not finished”.

    I’m guessing Mr. Vincent booked the cruise, and the missus is taking the opportunity of this annoyance to tally up the lifetime score.

    • #4
    • February 15, 2020, at 4:47 PM PST
    • Like
  5. Mark Camp Member

    Jon1979 (View Comment):

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…: Ellis Vincent, a 76-year old retired airline executive from Sydney, Australia, said he has spent more time than customary conversing with his wife while cooped up inside. She has an excellent memory, he said: “She is able to bring up every transgression I’ve ever had. I believe she is not finished”.

    I’m guessing Mr. Vincent booked the cruise, and the missus is taking the opportunity of this annoyance to tally up the lifetime score.

    I think you’ve not been married for very many decades. You are searching for explanations where none is required.

    • #5
    • February 15, 2020, at 4:51 PM PST
    • 7 likes
  6. MichaelKennedy Coolidge

    My wife and I were married 40 years ago, then divorced for 25 years. We have been back together for 5 years. I understand exactly what the man is saying. Women have better memories or more selective memories,. I haven’t decided.

    • #6
    • February 16, 2020, at 7:24 AM PST
    • 1 like
  7. Ontheleftcoast Member

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    I think you’ve not been married for very many decades. You are searching for explanations where none is required.

     There’s this from The Bronckhorst Divorce Case in Kipling’s Plain Tales From the Hills:

    Bronckhorst was not nice in any way. He had no respect for the pretty public and private lies that make life a little less nasty than it is. His manner towards his wife was coarse. There are many things—including actual assault with the clenched fist—that a wife will endure; but seldom a wife can bear—as Mrs. Bronckhorst bore—with a long course of brutal, hard chaff, making light of her weaknesses, her headaches, her small fits of gayety, her dresses, her queer little attempts to make herself attractive to her husband when she knows that she is not what she has been, and—worst of all—the love that she spends on her children. That particular sort of heavy-handed jest was specially dear to Bronckhorst. I suppose that he had first slipped into it, meaning no harm, in the honeymoon, when folk find their ordinary stock of endearments run short, and so go to the other extreme to express their feelings. A similar impulse make’s a man say:—“Hutt, you old beast!” when a favorite horse nuzzles his coat-front. Unluckily, when the reaction of marriage sets in, the form of speech remains, and, the tenderness having died out, hurts the wife more than she cares to say. But Mrs. Bronckhorst was devoted to her “teddy,” as she called him. Perhaps that was why he objected to her. Perhaps—this is only a theory to account for his infamous behavior later on—he gave way to the queer savage feeling that sometimes takes by the throat a husband twenty years’ married, when he sees, across the table, the same face of his wedded wife, and knows that, as he has sat facing it, so must he continue to sit until day of its death or his own. Most men and all women know the spasm. It only lasts for three breaths as a rule, must be a “throw-back” to times when men and women were rather worse than they are now, and is too unpleasant to be discussed.

    I’m not saying that Mr. Vincent resembles Bronckhorst in any way, but his words reminded me of the sentences I’ve italicized. I decided to quote the larger passage both for context and because of Kipling’s brilliant writing and razor sharp powers of observation.

    • #7
    • February 16, 2020, at 8:19 AM PST
    • 1 like
  8. notmarx Member

    She has an excellent memory, he said: “She is able to bring up every transgression I’ve ever had. I believe she is not finished”.

    ***

    My admiration for a beautifully phrased setup & punchline, so perfectly undertstated. Laugh out loud funny the first time you read it, it brings a smile every time you reread.

     

    • #8
    • February 17, 2020, at 5:49 AM PST
    • Like