Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Basic Protection in a Respiratory Epidemic

 

The novel coronavirus infection that started in China is now making its way around the world. There is no need to panic. Hopefully, our public health measures will contain the spread within the US to make it at best a minor issue. Personally, I think it would be prudent to halt travel to and from China at this point, or at least insist on a strict quarantine for anyone arriving from China.

However, what if it does get a major toehold in the US and you need to take action? What can you do to protect yourself and your family?

First, the most important factor is simple common sense and good hygiene. Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands! Twenty seconds with soap and hot water is number one; if that’s not available, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer is also helpful. Next, don’t touch your face or eyes. Anytime you touch a surface in public, cleanse your hands. Make sure you have some type of sanitizer to wipe down any surfaces at home or where you work.

What if you feel the need for some more active measures to protect yourself?

Masks can be helpful. Simple cloth masks have limited utility. Actually, masks are most effective when placed on the source of infection. If you want to go to a more effective method, the N95 respirator is used by most health care providers.

These are (currently) available at hardware stores, Walmart, and Amazon. Ideally, in the hospital they do a “fit test” to ensure a proper seal.

Doing a little research I found that the effectiveness of these masks is significantly enhanced if you place a “seal” of vaseline around the edge of the mask.

“The only mask to provide significantly different results on the Receiver was the N95 with a Vaseline seal.”

Additionally, you need to protect your eyes. The virus can be caught from exposure to the mucus membranes in the eye. Get yourself a pair of goggles. Swim goggles would work well, they form a tight seal around the eye, could probably be soaked in a sanitizer to allow reuse. Otherwise, any goodies that provide a good seal around the eyes will work.

Disclaimer:

I’m a simple ER doc. I don’t claim to be a virologist or infectious disease expert. I would welcome any input from anyone here with more expertise.

Good luck all. Remember that old Chinese curse: “May you live in interesting times.”

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There are 45 comments.

  1. Kozak Member
    Kozak Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

     

    • #1
    • January 27, 2020, at 6:03 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  2. Tex929rr Coolidge

    Making EMS calls and doing ER rotations one thing that amazes me is how often people will either not tell you everything or flat out Lie. Like the guy we strapped to a backboard to get him down off of the porch of basically a shack, and then after we got him in the ambulance his wife told us he had Hep C. Lots of LEO’s and medics get needle sticks after the patient clearly told them he or she didn’t have anything sharp in their pockets. 

    So you are on your own lookout for as far as protecting yourself. Assuming most people try to do the right thing is reasonable. Assuming everyone does is a mistake.

    • #2
    • January 27, 2020, at 6:26 AM PST
    • 12 likes
  3. Kozak Member
    Kozak Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    Making EMS calls and doing ER rotations one thing that amazes me is how often people will either not tell you everything or flat out Lie. Like the guy we strapped to a backboard to get him down off of the porch of basically a shack, and then after we got him in the ambulance his wife told us he had Hep C. Lots of LEO’s and medics get needle sticks after the patient clearly told them he or she didn’t have anything sharp in their pockets.

    So you are on your own lookout for as far as protecting yourself. Assuming most people try to do the right thing is reasonable. Assuming everyone does is a mistake.

    Yeah. Had multiple patients who I asked “any medical problems?” who answered no, only to find out they were HIV positive. When you confront them they get angry and tell me “it’s none of your business”.

    • #3
    • January 27, 2020, at 6:52 AM PST
    • 12 likes
  4. Mendel Member
    Mendel Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Good thread.

    Another simple piece of advice: get a flu shot.

    How does getting vaccinated against a different virus help you against coronavirus? It’s because the two have very similar symptoms at first. And in a genuine epidemic situation, doctors probably won’t be able to perform a specific test for the virus on every patient who presents with a fever and respiratory symptoms. So the fewer people with respiratory infections, the less chance for misdiagnosis, the less chance that you will go to the hospital without a coronavirus infection and end up contracting the coronavirus from another patient.

    And: the less chance that you will needlessly scare yourself to death thinking you have a coronavirus infection when you “just” have the flu.

    Added bonus: if – as is usually the case with these highly-visible virus epidemics – the coronavirus panic ends up being less severe than currently feared, you’ll still be protected against the flu this year.

    • #4
    • January 27, 2020, at 7:29 AM PST
    • 15 likes
  5. tigerlily Member

    Sounds like good advice. Thanks Kozak.

    • #5
    • January 27, 2020, at 7:31 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  6. Dr. Bastiat Member

    It’s hard for me to know what to think of this.

    I know they’re having some type of viral outbreak in China, but I don’t know anything about it, because I presume all the information released by the Chinese is not true.

    My daughter is studying in Singapore this semester. She’s traveling to Thailand, Malaysia, Japan, and I’m not sure where else. She asked me if she should be concerned. And I really didn’t know what to say.

    If the Chinese have had 56 deaths, I’d say that’s not bad, out of a billion people. They probably have more deaths than that every day in bicycle accidents.

    But if that were true, would they shut down entire cities?

    Again, I just don’t know. I’m eager for some reliable information, if anybody has some…

    • #6
    • January 27, 2020, at 8:09 AM PST
    • 9 likes
  7. The Reticulator Member

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):
    If the Chinese have had 56 deaths, I’d say that’s not bad, out of a billion people. They probably have more deaths than that every day in bicycle accidents.

    Fifty six deaths in a small area where contagion is plausible would be different than 56 deaths spread randomly across the country, no?

    • #7
    • January 27, 2020, at 8:19 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  8. Kozak Member
    Kozak Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Mendel (View Comment):

    Good thread.

    Another simple piece of advice: get a flu shot.

    How does getting vaccinated against a different virus help you against coronavirus? It’s because the two have very similar symptoms at first. And in a genuine epidemic situation, doctors probably won’t be able to perform a specific test for the virus on every patient who presents with a fever and respiratory symptoms. So the fewer people with respiratory infections, the less chance for misdiagnosis, the less chance that you will go to the hospital without a coronavirus infection and end up contracting the coronavirus from another patient.

    And: the less chance that you will needlessly scare yourself to death thinking you have a coronavirus infection when you “just” have the flu.

    Added bonus: if – as is usually the case with these highly-visible virus epidemics – the coronavirus panic ends up being less severe than currently feared, you’ll still be protected against the flu this year.

    Yeah. “When you hear hoofbeats think of horses not zebras” is the saying you learn in Med School. Common things are common, so we will go to the more common diagnosis.

    Flu is more common, and causes 10’s of thousands of deaths in the US every year.

    The symptom overlap between the Flu, and Corona viruses makes clinical diagnosis nearly impossible. During the SARS and MERS scares ( I was working in Saudi during MERS) it was difficult. Until we get a rapid test for Corona, like the one for flu ( this is going to be a very lucrative opportunity for some biotech company), we will be stuck with limited utility of travel hx and contact tracing.

    • #8
    • January 27, 2020, at 8:25 AM PST
    • 11 likes
  9. danok1 Member

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    If the Chinese have had 56 deaths, I’d say that’s not bad, out of a billion people. They probably have more deaths than that every day in bicycle accidents.

    But if that were true, would they shut down entire cities?

    My thoughts exactly. I’m willing to accept that this coronavirus isn’t really worse than the flu. But why are the ChiComs quarantining multiple large cities?

    I suppose “because they can” is a reason?

    • #9
    • January 27, 2020, at 8:30 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  10. James Gawron Thatcher
    James Gawron Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Kozak,

    First, I don’t know nothing about birthing no babies and I don’t know nothing about no pandemics. However, my old process control roving problem-solving subroutine from my ROM (brain) kicked in. So here are my thoughts.

    1. This makes me want to kick Greta Thunbabble in the rear end all the more. She blathers on funded by oodles of Soros money about problems that neither exist nor if they did would she understand. Meanwhile, we have an immediate threat of a pandemic. I doubt Soros is going to get involved because his Marxist pals won’t like it that the Chinese might get blamed. Of course, people might die, you know for real this time, and that was never big on the Soros agenda.
    2. We are getting bits and pieces of information from the Chinese. A Marxist government isn’t prone to lie they always lie as SOP. I don’t trust them period!
    3. The most disturbing thing that I’ve heard is that this damn thing has an incubation period of up to 2 weeks. This virus is communicable during the incubation period! That means people who don’t know they have it can be vectors of the disease big time. This makes the virus much more dangerous sh*t in terms of its pandemic possibilities.
    4. Because we don’t know who typhoid Mary might be, it would be good to have a cheap prescreening for the virus infection for suspects. Don’t know if one exists but now would be a really good time to find out! (sorry for the additional exclamation points but this isn’t situation normal and the Marxists have locked down 50-70 million people because of it. Not good.)

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #10
    • January 27, 2020, at 8:41 AM PST
    • 6 likes
  11. Arahant Member

    Kozak: Remember that old Chinese curse: “May you live in interesting times.”

    That was created by an American reporter in the 1920’s.

    • #11
    • January 27, 2020, at 8:51 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  12. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    It’s hard for me to know what to think of this.

    I know they’re having some type of viral outbreak in China, but I don’t know anything about it, because I presume all the information released by the Chinese is not true.

    My daughter is studying in Singapore this semester. She’s traveling to Thailand, Malaysia, Japan, and I’m not sure where else. She asked me if she should be concerned. And I really didn’t know what to say.

    If the Chinese have had 56 deaths, I’d say that’s not bad, out of a billion people. They probably have more deaths than that every day in bicycle accidents.

    But if that were true, would they shut down entire cities?

    Again, I just don’t know. I’m eager for some reliable information, if anybody has some…

    The one thing you can reliably say about the current regime in China: Any statement they release is probably not true.

    • #12
    • January 27, 2020, at 9:07 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  13. Mendel Member
    Mendel Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):
    Again, I just don’t know. I’m eager for some reliable information, if anybody has some…

    It’s true that much of the information coming from China is likely unreliable. We usually assume that means the actual situation is much worse than what they are reporting. But it could just as easily be the other way around, and the epidemic isn’t as bad as feared.

    After all, as Kozak said, it’s very difficult to distinguish between coronavirus pneumonia and other forms of infectious respiratory illness. And they certainly aren’t giving everyone lined up in those hospital hallways a specific test that can distinguish between coronavirus and something else.

    And are those people infected at all? How many of them just started coughing in the morning because their country is one of the most polluted in the world, thought they must have that new virus they heard a little about from their neighbors, and ran to the hospital? How many of the people with a fever in the hospital just got a normal flu because they’re packed in there like sardines?

    Not to mention the fact that many of the patients who actually died were elderly and/or had other severe conditions. How many of them actually died from this virus vs. some other cause, or simply overheating in an overcrowded hospital?

    Having worked in the field, I’ve been very close to several influenza epidemics, and in every case the “body counts” reported during the first few days were wildly overexaggerated, as every death within 100 miles of the index case that had the word “fever” in the deceased’s medical record was immediately attributed to the pandemic virus.

    Bottom line: we’ve been through several global virus pandemic scares over the past 15 years: H5N1, swine flu, Ebola, MERS-CoV, and others. In every case, the initial panic was unjustified. Even in the swine flu case -the worst epidemic of them all – the final number of patients and deaths was well below the initial projections.

    So don’t panic yet about your daughter.

    • #13
    • January 27, 2020, at 9:16 AM PST
    • 9 likes
  14. OmegaPaladin Moderator

    Kozak has made some good points, and I don’t really disagree with them. I’m an industrial hygienist and safety professional, not a doctor, although my group does work with nasty pathogens.

    I’ll add that you can get a good pair of laboratory splash goggles for less than a pizza, and they have versions that can be worn over glasses. Bonus – you can protect your eyes when working with oven cleaner, bleach sprayers, or other nasty stuff.

    However, I would like to caution people about N95 masks. They are certified and rated respirator, not just dust masks.

    If you have trouble breathing normally, or heart issues – talk with your doctor before wearing an N95 mask. They restrict airflow – that’s how the filter works – and they become more restrictive as more junk is caught in the filter. This means that the mask gets better at removing germs and such, but it also becomes harder to breath through. This especially applies if you are working hard / running. I’ve done remediation work in an N95 mask, and it gets unpleasant.

    Also, you need a secure face seal for this to work. This means the respirator needs to fit – they come in different sizes, naturally. Also, beards are a problem, as they break up the seal. Mustaches are fine – which is why I continue to rock the ‘stache.

    Surgical masks are cheaper, easier to wear, and provide some protection. Even keeping you from touching your mouth/nose is a plus. We recommend them for lab workers over N95 respirators in most cases, but N95s will provide more complete protection.

    • #14
    • January 27, 2020, at 9:16 AM PST
    • 8 likes
  15. Arahant Member

    Jim McConnell (View Comment):
    The one thing you can reliably say about the current regime in China: Any statement they release is probably not true.

    So, China is ruled by Democrats? 😉

    • #15
    • January 27, 2020, at 9:18 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  16. Mendel Member
    Mendel Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    danok1 (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    If the Chinese have had 56 deaths, I’d say that’s not bad, out of a billion people. They probably have more deaths than that every day in bicycle accidents.

    But if that were true, would they shut down entire cities?

    My thoughts exactly. I’m willing to accept that this coronavirus isn’t really worse than the flu. But why are the ChiComs quarantining multiple large cities?

    I suppose “because they can” is a reason?

    I think there are two reasons.

    The first is because the Chinese are only capable of using blunt tools for public health. In the US and Western Europe, we have enough infrastructure, organization, and expertise to test/quarantine/warn people in a targeted manner. The Chinese aren’t anywhere near that far along. So their choices are pretty much “widespread quarantine” vs. “nothing”.

    The second is because of reports that the virus might be contagious before symptoms start. If that’s true (and it’s still unconfirmed), that does up the stakes of the epidemic, since it means many people might currently be infected and not know it.

    Adding those criteria up make widespread quarantine seem like the wiser option of the two.

    • #16
    • January 27, 2020, at 9:19 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  17. Al French Moderator

    See comments by @saintaugustine numbered 167 and 168 at link.

    https://ricochet.com/675720/divine-help-september/comment-page-6/#comment-4683005

     

    • #17
    • January 27, 2020, at 10:05 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  18. Al French Moderator

    A more reassuring take by the CDC via Wattsupwiththat.

    • #18
    • January 27, 2020, at 10:08 AM PST
    • 1 like
  19. Kozak Member
    Kozak Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Kozak: Remember that old Chinese curse: “May you live in interesting times.”

    That was created by an American reported in the 1920’s.

    Don’t ruin it with facts.

     

    • #19
    • January 27, 2020, at 11:26 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  20. RushBabe49 Thatcher

    I work in a place where the bathrooms have all automatic faucets. The user has NO control over the temperature of the water that comes out. They also restrict the amount of water you can use per wash, so you end up pushing the lever multiple times to get your hands clean and rinsed off. Environmental wackos have determined that “Conserving” water is more important than getting your hands clean. When I can, I use the little kitchen sink near my work area, so I can get really hot water, and as much as I want.

    • #20
    • January 27, 2020, at 12:06 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  21. Right Wing Teamster Lawyer Thatcher

    Kozak: I’m a simple ER doc.

    In my eyes that puts you ahead of 99.99% of the population. Thanks.

    • #21
    • January 27, 2020, at 12:22 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  22. James Gawron Thatcher
    James Gawron Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Kozak (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Kozak: Remember that old Chinese curse: “May you live in interesting times.”

    That was created by an American reported in the 1920’s.

    Don’t ruin it with facts.

     

    Kozak & Ari,

    Things are getting more interesting in China by the minute.

    Chinese Media Scapegoat Local Officials After Mayor Blames Beijing for Secrecy on Outbreak

    China’s Communist Party propaganda outlets made clear on Monday that Beijing is intent to blame local officials in Wuhan for the growing viral epidemic consuming the country, calling it “regrettable” that municipal leaders let 5 million people leave the city during the outbreak.

    State outlets also quoted alleged online sentiment calling a press conference by Wuhan Mayor Zhou Xianwang a “disaster” and remarks by National Health Commission (NHC) officials lamenting that some local governments “lack determination” in addressing the problem.

    Zhou, in a press conference late Sunday, confessed that the government did indeed keep pivotal public health information a secret, but insisted that he had to because he needed approval from higher-ranking Communist Party officials to reveal the extent of the health threat.

    Wuhan officials confirmed last week that a previously unidentified form of coronavirus had begun spreading in the metropolis, a city of 11 million whose greater metropolitan area is home to nearly 20 million. Chinese scientists only began sharing the virus’s genome sequence, which allows for identification, to global authorities last Monday. Evidence suggests that locals in Wuhan were aware of a respiratory illness spreading as early as a month ago but continued to hold risky public events – like a banquet attended by 130,000 people – and failed to inform people to use precautionary measures.

    The viral sh*t is hitting the fan.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #22
    • January 27, 2020, at 12:23 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  23. Manny Member

    What are you supposed to do, wear a mask and goggles in public?

    • #23
    • January 27, 2020, at 12:31 PM PST
    • 1 like
  24. SkipSul Coolidge
    SkipSul Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Manny (View Comment):

    What are you supposed to do, wear a mask and goggles in public?

    vegans

    There are some more fashionable options out there…

    • #24
    • January 27, 2020, at 12:59 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  25. The Reticulator Member

    Manny (View Comment):

    What are you supposed to do, wear a mask and goggles in public?

    One of these might work: https://www.amazon.com/JOLIN-Anti-Dust-Industrial-Chemical-Respirator/dp/B01M32808Y/

    Maybe Dr. Cossack could advise. I recently bought a new mask for use while staining and urethaning wood, but I didn’t get a full mask that covers the eyes as well. I bought a 3M-brand mask; I understand the 3M brand is selling well in China now. I have a short beard that probably does make the seal less than complete, but I’ve noticed that the mask completely cuts the smell of the stain, pre-stain, or urethane as far as I can tell. When I take the mask off at the end of a session, the odor hits me immediately. And it’s reasonably comfortable to wear and breath through the thing. Maybe most virus particles go for a ride on the same type of aerosol particles that these things are designed to trap. I don’t know that for a fact, though. 

    I don’t usually step outside the house while wearing my mask, so I haven’t been able to gauge the reaction of others to the sight.

    Here is the one I bought: https://www.amazon.com/JOLIN-Anti-Dust-Industrial-Chemical-Respirator/dp/B01M32808Y/

    • #25
    • January 27, 2020, at 1:04 PM PST
    • 1 like
  26. The Reticulator Member

    SkipSul (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    What are you supposed to do, wear a mask and goggles in public?

    vegans

    There are some more fashionable options out there…

    Molded by it? Some people wear masks to keep out mold. I keep telling them that mold is everywhere, and that we would all die without it, but they do it anyway.

    • #26
    • January 27, 2020, at 1:06 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  27. Aaron Miller Member
    Aaron Miller Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Ready, sarge. 

    • #27
    • January 27, 2020, at 1:24 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  28. Ontheleftcoast Member

    There are in vitro studies which suggest that black elderberry (Sambucus nigra) extracts (no, Sambuca doesn’t count) can interfere with the ability of enveloped viruses such as coronavirus and influenza virus to invade animal cells, which blunts their ability to cause disease. Other plants with similar properties in vitro include St John’s Wort, Astragalus membranaceous (this is the Chinese medicine astragalus,) and IIRC marine algaes and seaweeds.

    Elderberry has at least one smallish double blind study which supports the idea that it actually works. The syrups taste good, but are more expensive per dose than capsules and tend to contain a fair amount of sugar.

    St John’s Wort should be used with caution if you are taking medications, since it alters the metabolism of many drugs– clearing some too soon, and activating others more than they otherwise would be.

    Astragalus tastes doesn’t taste bad, and can be (traditionally often is) incorporated into soups and stews; you can do the same with seaweeds.

    All culinary mushrooms provide some cell mediated immune support.

    Depressed zinc status, which is actually fairly common, can impair immune response in general. Nutrition expert Chris Masterjohn suggests testing plasma zinc rather than serum levels:

    Plasma zinc must be taken after an overnight fast. For men, it should be above 740 micrograms per liter (ppb) or 0.74 μg/mL. For women, it should be above 700 μg/L (ppb) or 0.7 μg/mL. However, the sweet spot may be closer to 1000. Plasma zinc plateaus in response to a robust zinc intake somewhere around 1200 μg/mL, and I would not worry if plasma zinc is high within the normal range.

    You can indeed take too much, and it’s immunosuppressive among other things. The average male ejaculation contains about 5 mg. Oysters are indeed a good dietary source of zinc. 

    10 or so mg/d is probably safe long term dosing; 25-50 mg/d is conservative dosing for repletion. Unless you know for sure that you need more.

    Masterjohn suggests a short term regimen using zinc acetate or acetate and gluconate lozenges; the acetate is more effective. The lozenges must be big enough to take about 30 minutes to dissolve, since a big part of what you’re after is a topical effect in the throat, and the application must be repeated every couple of hours. Total daily dose with this approach is 75 mg/d, which is too much to take long term. 

    For colds, very early in the illness is best. By the third day, it won’t help much.

    So some strategies: Probably good vitamin D status. The above foods and herbs. If you have to go to the ER, in addition to masks and hand washing, consider preloading with zinc acetate and continuing the dosing through the visit (sorry, @kozak this is a temporary expedient, though you could reserve it for one of those “uh oh” days.)

     

     

     

    • #28
    • January 27, 2020, at 1:31 PM PST
    • Like
  29. Clifford A. Brown Contributor

    Mendel (View Comment):

    danok1 (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    If the Chinese have had 56 deaths, I’d say that’s not bad, out of a billion people. They probably have more deaths than that every day in bicycle accidents.

    But if that were true, would they shut down entire cities?

    My thoughts exactly. I’m willing to accept that this coronavirus isn’t really worse than the flu. But why are the ChiComs quarantining multiple large cities?

    I suppose “because they can” is a reason?

    I think there are two reasons.

    The first is because the Chinese are only capable of using blunt tools for public health. In the US and Western Europe, we have enough infrastructure, organization, and expertise to test/quarantine/warn people in a targeted manner. The Chinese aren’t anywhere near that far along. So their choices are pretty much “widespread quarantine” vs. “nothing”.

    The second is because of reports that the virus might be contagious before symptoms start. If that’s true (and it’s still unconfirmed), that does up the stakes of the epidemic, since it means many people might currently be infected and not know it.

    Adding those criteria up make widespread quarantine seem like the wiser option of the two.

    And. We, from the position of a half century of relative security, have tilted the legal system radically towards individuals, banking on superior medicine to cover any danger created by exposing other people in the name of individual rights. 

    • #29
    • January 27, 2020, at 2:00 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  30. Caryn Thatcher
    Caryn Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    It’s hard for me to know what to think of this.

    I know they’re having some type of viral outbreak in China, but I don’t know anything about it, because I presume all the information released by the Chinese is not true.

    My daughter is studying in Singapore this semester. She’s traveling to Thailand, Malaysia, Japan, and I’m not sure where else. She asked me if she should be concerned. And I really didn’t know what to say.

    If the Chinese have had 56 deaths, I’d say that’s not bad, out of a billion people. They probably have more deaths than that every day in bicycle accidents.

    But if that were true, would they shut down entire cities?

    Again, I just don’t know. I’m eager for some reliable information, if anybody has some…

    One of the most reliable sources for information on infectious disease outbreaks is ProMed. It’s an email listserve that I’ve been participating in for over 20 years. 

    They also have a searchable website. Here’s one of their recent posts on the novel Coronavirus. Scroll down to the “See Also” listing for previous entries on the topic.

    • #30
    • January 27, 2020, at 2:40 PM PST
    • 2 likes