Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Actors on Actors: Learn to Like ’em

 

Variety has a series on YouTube where they pair actors and have them interview each other. It’s good viewing and the results are sometimes surprising. It does one other thing, I think: shines a light on their professionalism and how serious they are about what they do.

More often than not we view Hollywood with disdain, and it is certainly true that few of the people in these videos would feel politically at home here. None of this is about politics, it’s entertainment; or to them, it’s about craft and art. I enjoyed seeing their commitment to the work.

Here are a few to get you started:

One of my favorites is this next one,

And as interesting as it is to see two actors who never met, it is also fun to see former costars:

Enjoy … or not. All the best to you.

Published in Entertainment
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  1. Gossamer Cat Coolidge

    I like listening to actors when they talk about things they know about, but not when they open their mouths to pontificate on things about which they know nothing.

    • #1
    • December 18, 2019, at 6:34 PM PST
    • 11 likes
  2. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    A fine post, Chris. It gets beyond the politics that we’re all understandably obsessed with these days. 

    • #2
    • December 18, 2019, at 9:39 PM PST
    • 6 likes
  3. Songwriter Member
    Songwriter Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Thanks for posting. Enjoyed watching a couple of these already.

    • #3
    • December 19, 2019, at 6:52 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  4. Clifford A. Brown Contributor

    William Shatner’s Raw Nerve was excellent television, precisely because he was actually interested in hearing the person he was interviewing.

    • #4
    • December 19, 2019, at 8:02 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  5. Chris O. Coolidge
    Chris O. Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    William Shatner’s Raw Nerve was excellent television, precisely because he was actually interested in hearing the person he was interviewing.

    I saw a bit of that and agree; it was good viewing!

    • #5
    • December 20, 2019, at 4:47 AM PST
    • Like
  6. Chris O. Coolidge
    Chris O. Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Songwriter (View Comment):

    Thanks for posting. Enjoyed watching a couple of these already.

    If you think one is particularly good, tell us here!

    • #6
    • December 20, 2019, at 4:48 AM PST
    • Like
  7. Aaron Miller Member
    Aaron Miller Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I don’t blame famous people for sharing their thoughts on anything when asked. That’s normal human behavior. Fame is a sort of power (influence) and thus merits responsible care when speaking publicly. But most people of any stripe would simply respond to whatever is asked.

    Considering that most conservatives keep silent about controversial topics in public and at work to avoid consequences, we should cut Hollywood actors and other celebrities some slack for bowing to similar pressures… voicing popular opinions.

    Anyway, I’d be interested to hear about acting technique from actors who play themselves in every movie; like Sean Connery or Tommy Lee Jones. Do they consider acting to be relatively easy?

    I imagine the hardest part of film acting is often shooting scenes out of sequence. But there are also physical trials, like ignoring the cold for hours on end.

    • #7
    • December 20, 2019, at 8:21 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  8. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Aaron Miller: I imagine the hardest part of film acting is often shooting scenes out of sequence. But there are also physical trials, like ignoring the cold for hours on end.

    The hardest part of film acting is the waiting. It’s hard to pin down who said it first but there’s an old actor’s line that goes something like this: “They pay me to wait and I throw in the acting for free.”

    When William Daniels was shooting the outdoor scenes for the opening number of 1776, it was 35° on the Warner backlot. Every time he opened his mouth his breath was visible so he sucked on ice cubes between takes.

    • #8
    • December 20, 2019, at 9:53 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  9. Hoyacon Member

    I think some of my bad feelings about actors and their “craft” come from my occasional viewings of “Inside the Actors Studio,” which I found pretentious and self-congratulatory. But that’s just me.

    • #9
    • December 20, 2019, at 12:42 PM PST
    • 1 like
  10. Chris O. Coolidge
    Chris O. Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Aaron Miller (View Comment):
    Anyway, I’d be interested to hear about acting technique from actors who play themselves in every movie; like Sean Connery or Tommy Lee Jones. Do they consider acting to be relatively easy?

    There is a famous story Kevin Costner tells about Sean doing close ups and wearing his golf pants along with the top half of his costume. He was pretty demanding about the schedule staying on schedule. Costner chuckles about it when he tells it, but he also acknowledges the professionalism that Connery had, and demanded of others.

    Hoyacon (View Comment):
    I think some of my bad feelings about actors and their “craft” come from my occasional viewings of “Inside the Actors Studio,” which I found pretentious and self-congratulatory.

    And while we’re talking about Tommy Lee Jones, if you can dig up his Inside the Actors’ Studio appearance, it’s priceless.

    Lipton: “How do you feel about the death penalty?”

    Jones: “They can’t kill ’em fast enough.”

    That effectively cut off any sort of political discussion. I also recall his favorite swear word, more of a phrase, really. Perhaps Lipton set too august a tone about the art/profession, but some of the guests didn’t follow him there. Clint Eastwood is another great interview on that program.

    • #10
    • December 22, 2019, at 12:03 PM PST
    • 1 like