Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I Don’t Trust the American People

 

Politicians on both sides of the aisle insist that they can trust the American people. Since I have also believed there are reasons to have faith in our citizens, I always silently nod in agreement at these words. But this morning, I asked myself: What does that statement even mean?

At first glance, I assume that those of us who make this remark believe that ultimately citizens will learn/recognize/figure out the truth of a complex political situation. But do we really believe they will make that effort? Do we honestly think that the American people will get through the maze and hyperbole of the information they receive from the media to get to the “truth”?

If we review the last hoax perpetrated on the American people, also known as the Mueller Report, do you think that most people know at least the final results? Or in spite of the report’s conclusions, do they still believe that Donald Trump committed obstruction of justice?

The sad news is that a poll was taken to get people’s reactions to the report and the results were no surprise: for the most part, no one’s mind was significantly changed, even though Trump was not found guilty of obstruction or colluding with the Russians. The poll also points out, however, that few people had reviewed the results of the report. That suggests that most of the people polled had only received input from social media, the mainstream media or their friends (who more than likely share their views).

You may not be surprised by these results, but I’m greatly concerned about them. Once again, the Democrat and media partnership are attacking Donald Trump and his administration through their impeachment fiasco. (I refuse to call it anything else.) To some degree, the Republicans and President Trump are pushing back.

One example of this push-back is the eight-page letter sent from the White House defying the illegitimacy of this action. In part, it said:

Given that your inquiry lacks any legitimate constitutional foundation, any pretense of fairness, or even the most elementary due process protections, the Executive Branch cannot be expected to participate in it. Because participating in this inquiry under the current unconstitutional posture would inflict lasting institutional harm on the Executive Branch and lasting damage to the separation of powers, you have left the President no choice. Consistent with the duties of the President of the United States, and in particular his obligation to preserve the rights of future occupants of his office, President Trump cannot permit his Administration to participate in this partisan inquiry under these circumstances.

And yet the letter is described by some as a “tantrum.”

And this was Nancy Pelosi’s response, in part:

For a while, the president has tried to normalize lawlessness. Now, he is trying to make lawlessness a virtue. The American people have already heard the President’s own words—‘do us a favor, though.’ The president’s actions threaten our national security, violate our Constitution and undermine the integrity of our elections. The White House letter is only the latest attempt to cover up his betrayal of our democracy, and to insist that the president is above the law.

It makes sense for the President to refuse to cooperate. At the same time, you can be sure that the Democrats/media will continue to chastise Trump for his lack of cooperation, stating that he has something to hide. We can see the results of the propaganda being disseminated in this latest Fox Poll:

For those who prefer the 538 polls, here is a partial statement from that site:

According to our average, 48.8 percent of people support impeachment, while only 43.6 percent don’t support it.1 That’s an increase even from last week, when the share of people who supported and opposed impeachment were roughly the same. What’s changed? Early this week, we got a couple new, high-quality polls that showed a majority of Americans in favor of an impeachment inquiry. Most notably, a Washington Post-Schar School poll found that 58 percent of Americans agreed with the House’s decision to start an impeachment inquiry, and only 38 percent disagreed with it. And an Investor’s Business Daily/TIPP found that 55 percent approved of the House’s decision and 44 percent disapproved.

We can hope that the Inspector General’s report and the DOJ report authored by John Durham will have an impact on the current chaos and misrepresentations. But I’m not optimistic. The media will challenge the legitimacy of the information, mischaracterize it, or ignore it.

The public has demonstrated that even though it doesn’t trust the media, it continues to go to them for information. The public insists that it can weigh all the information and come to a legitimate conclusion, even though it doesn’t actually read the original sources or trust those who publicize this information. As long as the Left continues to control its message, we need to worry about the 2020 election.

Frankly, I don’t trust the American people.

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There are 94 comments.

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  1. Seawriter Member

    Susan Quinn: Frankly, I don’t trust the American public.

    That sounds like a quote from our elites.

    If you really cannot trust the American public, then it is game over.

    As for me? The folks I don’t trust are the polling companies. If they do not produce polls which makes those hiring them (the untrustworthy American new media) they get no further business. It is the same rice-bowl motive driving all the government-funded junk science nowadays. If you don’t give the expected results you are forced out of business.

    • #1
    • October 10, 2019, at 7:54 AM PST
    • 15 likes
  2. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: Frankly, I don’t trust the American public.

    That sounds like a quote from our elites.

    If you really cannot trust the American public, then it is game over.

    As for me? The folks I don’t trust are the polling companies. If they do not produce polls which makes those hiring them (the untrustworthy American new media) they get no further business. It is the same rice-bowl motive driving all the government-funded junk science nowadays. If you don’t give the expected results you are forced out of business.

    I don’t disagree, @seawriter. But this time I think people should be concerned. Do you really think people are doing their homework and studying reports for the truth? Do you think that after three years some folks are really getting tired of Trump and his bloviating, and will think it’s a cover for questionable behavior? I’m especially concerned about Independents; will they be convinced that the impeachment effort is all smoke and mirrors? Remember, Trump didn’t win the popular vote the last time and had no track record. If the media is creating a “track record” for him, doesn’t that cause you concern?

    Still, I hope you’re right!

    • #2
    • October 10, 2019, at 7:59 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  3. Seawriter Member

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    If the media is creating a “track record” for him, doesn’t that cause you concern?

    There is an old story about two campers in a tent awoken at night by a grizzly bear snuffing at the tent. One of the two campers starts putting on his shoes. His companion says “you fool. You can’t outrun a grizzly.” The other one responds, “That might be true, but I only have to outrun you.”

    Look at the Democrat candidates. Warren is the most likely to win the nomination at this point, but none of the rest come out looking good. By comparison Trump is the adult in the room.

    Also, I suspect a lot of people like me simply refused to be polled. If even a quarter of those with conservative opinions hang up on pollsters who does that leave answering polls? And what do you think that does to the results?

    • #3
    • October 10, 2019, at 8:28 AM PST
    • 8 likes
  4. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… Member

    Susan, I think that you make a good point. It reminds me of a quote by H.L. Mencken (or at least attributed to him): “Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard.”

    The idea that the average person is knowledgeable or wise enough to make decisions about important, complex issues strikes me as a dubious idea. We do not think that this works in medicine, or to make or fix a car or a computer, or in many other areas.

    I think that representative government is a very good thing, but not because of the brilliance or wisdom of the average person. It is true that sometimes the common sense of an ordinary person is better than the wisdom of the sages. I’m reminded of Buckley’s comment about preferring to be governed by the first 400 people in the Boston telephone directory than the faculty of Harvard.

    Representative government has two great advantages. It provides for an orderly and peaceful transition of power, and it provides for a corrective if the people don’t like the job that the existing government is doing.

    It requires an informed and virtuous citizenry, as the founders stated. John Adams said (here):

    But should the People of America, once become capable of that deep <> simulation towards one another and towards foreign nations, which assumes the Language of Justice and moderation while it is practicing Iniquity and Extravagance; and displays in the most captivating manner the charming Pictures of Candour frankness & sincerity while it is rioting in rapine and Insolence: this Country will be the most miserable Habitation in the World. Because We have no Government armed with Power capable of contending with human Passions unbridled by <> morality and Religion. Avarice, Ambition <> Revenge or Galantry, would break the strongest Cords of our Constitution as a Whale goes through a Net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious People. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.

    (This was from a speech, and the <> notation appears to indicate words that were not clear.)

    • #4
    • October 10, 2019, at 8:39 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  5. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    If the media is creating a “track record” for him, doesn’t that cause you concern?

    There is an old story about two campers in a tent awoken at night by a grizzly bear snuffing at the tent. One of the two campers starts putting on his shoes. His companion says “you fool. You can’t outrun a grizzly.” The other one responds, “That might be true, but I only have to outrun you.”

    Look at the Democrat candidates. Warren is the most likely to win the nomination at this point, but none of the rest come out looking good. By comparison Trump is the adult in the room.

    Also, I suspect a lot of people like me simply refused to be polled. If even a quarter of those with conservative opinions hang up on pollsters who does that leave answering polls? And what do you think that does to the results?

    Another good point. We don’t answer polls, and I suspect a lot of conservatives don’t. I think I’m getting tired of Trump’s rhetoric and at some level I cringe at the idea of four more years. I appreciate his anger and pushing back, but it’s still difficult to listen to.

    I don’t know if the public will see Trump as the adult in the room. If you look at his work, what he does, and what he plans, he looks like the adult. If you look at Warren’s promises, they’re ridiculous. But she does sound reasonable. Who sounds more like an adult? We don’t know how people will look at temperament as an issue; you can be sure that will be pointed out. Just sayin’.

    • #5
    • October 10, 2019, at 8:42 AM PST
    • Like
  6. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio&hellip; (View Comment):

    Susan, I think that you make a good point. It reminds me of a quote by H.L. Mencken (or at least attributed to him): “Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard.”

    The idea that the average person is knowledgeable or wise enough to make decisions about important, complex issues strikes me as a dubious idea. We do not think that this works in medicine, or to make or fix a car or a computer, or in many other areas.

    I think that representative government is a very good thing, but not because of the brilliance or wisdom of the average person. It is true that sometimes the common sense of an ordinary person is better than the wisdom of the sages. I’m reminded of Buckley’s comment about preferring to be governed by the first 400 people in the Boston telephone directory than the faculty of Harvard.

    Representative government has two great advantages. It provides for an orderly and peaceful transition of power, and it provides for a corrective if the people don’t like the job that the existing government is doing.

    It requires an informed and virtuous citizenry, as the founders stated. John Adams said (here):

    But should the People of America, once become capable of that deep <> simulation towards one another and towards foreign nations, which assumes the Language of Justice and moderation while it is practicing Iniquity and Extravagance; and displays in the most captivating manner the charming Pictures of Candour frankness & sincerity while it is rioting in rapine and Insolence: this Country will be the most miserable Habitation in the World. Because We have no Government armed with Power capable of contending with human Passions unbridled by <> morality and Religion. Avarice, Ambition <> Revenge or Galantry, would break the strongest Cords of our Constitution as a Whale goes through a Net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious People. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.

    (This was from a speech, and the <> notation appears to indicate words that were not clear.)

    Thanks, Jerry. That’s a great quote. I suspect I may sound arrogant in my skepticism about the people; it has nothing to do with intellect (or at least very little to do with it), but whether there is a motivation to take the time to investigate, study and try to understand what is going on. Regarding an understanding of medicine, I may get a second or third opinion for a serious operation, but I’m not likely to study the intricacies of what is being done, for the reasons you point out. But I do have an obligation to do some research–it’s the only body I have! And this is my only country; I’m not sure others treasure what we have as you and I do.

    • #6
    • October 10, 2019, at 8:47 AM PST
    • 1 like
  7. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher

    The People are sovereign. They may, or may not, make the choice I like. The system stinks. It is the worst of all, except for all the others. 

    • #7
    • October 10, 2019, at 8:52 AM PST
    • 10 likes
  8. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The People are sovereign. They may, or may not, make the choice I like. The system stinks. It is the worst of all, except for all the others.

    Yes, it is our system. I don’t think the form of the government is failing us; it’s those who are supposed to be governing. Thanks, @bryangstephens.

    • #8
    • October 10, 2019, at 9:00 AM PST
    • 6 likes
  9. Stad Thatcher

    Susan Quinn: Frankly, I don’t trust the American people.

    I know what you mean – they elected Obama twice.

    However, I trust the American people a heckuva lot more than I trust the polls, which use scientific statistical analysis to analyze a highly variable, often changing, non-scientific flawed data set – the opinions of human beings.

    • #9
    • October 10, 2019, at 9:21 AM PST
    • 8 likes
  10. Henry Castaigne Member

    As Federalist 51 by Madison put it,

     But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions.

    Humans just ain’t made that good.

    • #10
    • October 10, 2019, at 9:34 AM PST
    • 7 likes
  11. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):
    A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions.

    Thanks, @henrycastaigne. I agree. But when the government ignores precautions in place, it makes it kind of tough on the people!

    • #11
    • October 10, 2019, at 9:42 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  12. WillowSpring Member

    Susan Quinn: The public has demonstrated that even though it doesn’t trust the media, it continues to go to them for information.

    I’m not sure about the first part. When my older brother died several years ago, I spent a lot of time with my younger brother and both their families of 20 somethings. Their “news” was from PBS and the late night comedy shows. They are extremely liberal – at the time, Sanders supporters over Hillary.

    The problem is that they will not cultivate any other, more direct sources*. They don’t know what they don’t know, so it isn’t worth looking further. As the local morning talk show guy (Chris Plante, WMAL) often says, “the most powerful tool the media has is the power to ignore”.

    I think Trump and his tweets are one of the best ways to break through this. His tweets cause the media to try to spin things, but they can’t avoid discussing the original issue. For example, the hubbub about the Ukraine call unavoidably brings up the Biden corruption.

    *for example, https://theconservativetreehouse.com/ has some opinion/interpretation of news, but also has transcripts and links to original sources such as indictments and speeches

    • #12
    • October 10, 2019, at 10:55 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  13. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    WillowSpring (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: The public has demonstrated that even though it doesn’t trust the media, it continues to go to them for information.

    I’m not sure about the first part. When my older brother died several years ago, I spent a lot of time with my younger brother and both their families of 20 somethings. Their “news” was from PBS and the late night comedy shows. They are extremely liberal – at the time, Sanders supporters over Hillary.

    The problem is that they will not cultivate any other, more direct sources*. They don’t know what they don’t know, so it isn’t worth looking further. As the local morning talk show guy (Chris Plante, WMAL) often says, “the most powerful tool the media has is the power to ignore”.

    I think Trump and his tweets are one of the best ways to break through this. His tweets cause the media to try to spin things, but they can’t avoid discussing the original issue. For example, the hubbub about the Ukraine call unavoidably brings up the Biden corruption.

    *for example, https://theconservativetreehouse.com/ has some opinion/interpretation of news, but also has transcripts and links to original sources such as indictments and speeches

    Good points, @willowspring. I’m skeptical if anyone on the Left takes Trump’s tweets seriously, even if they read them. But I can hope some of them get through. Sigh.

    • #13
    • October 10, 2019, at 10:58 AM PST
    • Like
  14. WillowSpring Member

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    Good points, @willowspring. I’m skeptical if anyone on the Left takes Trump’s tweets seriously, even if they read them. But I can hope some of them get through. Sigh.

    I guess I wasn’t clear, I think it is the Media spin of the tweets that will get through, not the tweets themselves. They will at least know that there is something being talked about.

    • #14
    • October 10, 2019, at 11:03 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  15. OldPhil Coolidge

    I don’t trust polls. Any of them. Oh, except the one that happens every four years.

    • #15
    • October 10, 2019, at 11:14 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  16. David Foster Member

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio&hellip; (View Comment):
    The idea that the average person is knowledgeable or wise enough to make decisions about important, complex issues strikes me as a dubious idea. We do not think that this works in medicine, or to make or fix a car or a computer, or in many other areas.

    But in medicine and in car/computer-fixing, there are specific, demonstrable skills and items of knowledge that are involved. What might be the equivalent of those for *governing a country*??

    • #16
    • October 10, 2019, at 11:21 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  17. Tex929rr Coolidge

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    If the media is creating a “track record” for him, doesn’t that cause you concern?

     

    Also, I suspect a lot of people like me simply refused to be polled. If even a quarter of those with conservative opinions hang up on pollsters who does that leave answering polls? And what do you think that does to the results?

    I have wondered that same thing for a long time. I don’t respond to phone polls or people with clipboards who assault you in public seeking you opinion. How could any pollster sample to preclude distortion from non-participants?

    I predict a huge number of Trump voters will be silent when asked in 2020. If I could only be as happy on 11/4/20 as I was on 11/9/16.

    By the way, Susan, the 2016 POTUS election results sort of work against your theory. The American people saw through an overwhelming tide of negativity against DJT.

    • #17
    • October 10, 2019, at 11:27 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  18. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Tex929rr (View Comment):
    By the way, Susan, the 2016 POTUS election results sort of work against your theory. The American people saw through an overwhelming tide of negativity against DJT.

    Very good point, @tex929rr. But there’s a lot of distortion and negativity that has transpired since then, and remember, he didn’t win the popular vote. Still, I hope you’re right. And I mentioned earlier that I don’t do polls either!

    • #18
    • October 10, 2019, at 11:31 AM PST
    • Like
  19. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… Member

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio&hellip; (View Comment):
    The idea that the average person is knowledgeable or wise enough to make decisions about important, complex issues strikes me as a dubious idea. We do not think that this works in medicine, or to make or fix a car or a computer, or in many other areas.

    But in medicine and in car/computer-fixing, there are specific, demonstrable skills and items of knowledge that are involved. What might be the equivalent of those for *governing a country*??

    Yeah, it’s tricky.

    Education and experience in law is the thing. This is why we are a nation of lawyers, often a phrase used as an epithet, as if Adams and Jefferson and Hamilton and Madison and Jay and Monroe and Quincy Adams and Jackson and Lincoln were all terrible.

    I don’t want a dictatorship of the lawyers, even though I am one. I think that it is a good thing to have periodic referenda on the quality of our governance, which are called elections.

    • #19
    • October 10, 2019, at 11:32 AM PST
    • 1 like
  20. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio&hellip; (View Comment):
    I don’t want a dictatorship of the lawyers, even though I am one. I think that it is a good thing to have periodic referenda on the quality of our governance, which are called elections.

    Then again, who knows better than lawyers how to evade or manipulate the laws? Sorry, Jerry, my cynicism is overflowing–it’s not personal!

    • #20
    • October 10, 2019, at 11:35 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  21. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… Member

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio&hellip; (View Comment):
    I don’t want a dictatorship of the lawyers, even though I am one. I think that it is a good thing to have periodic referenda on the quality of our governance, which are called elections.

    Then again, who knows better than lawyers how to evade or manipulate the laws? Sorry, Jerry, my cynicism is overflowing–it’s not personal!

    You’re absolutely correct about this. Anybody can do it, but we lawyers have greater expertise. This is a good reason to support limited government.

    However, limited government does not work well unless there is moral consensus among the people. We no longer have such a moral consensus. It is quite a mess.

    • #21
    • October 10, 2019, at 12:01 PM PST
    • 7 likes
  22. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio&hellip; (View Comment):
    However, limited government does not work well unless there is moral consensus among the people. We no longer have such a moral consensus. It is quite a mess.

    This!

    • #22
    • October 10, 2019, at 12:06 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  23. aardo vozz Member

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I don’t know if the public will see Trump as the adult in the room. If you look at his work, what he does, and what he plans, he looks like the adult. If you look at Warren’s promises, they’re ridiculous. But she does sound reasonable. Who sounds more like an adult?

    Good point. But a wise person once told me NEVER to confuse composure with sanity, so I pay more attention to the actual words and promises. In a nation of over 300 million people, I don’t think I’m the only one.

    • #23
    • October 10, 2019, at 12:20 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  24. David Foster Member

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio&hellip; (View Comment):
    Education and experience in law is the thing.

    Why?

    Why is education & experience in law more important than education & experience in the things the law is *about*?…say, law *enforcement*, transportation, finance, energy…?

    In business, much of what a company does is represented by legal documents of some time…contracts, bond indentures, SEC filings, etc….but it doesn’t follow therefrom that all companies should be run by lawyers.

    • #24
    • October 10, 2019, at 12:22 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  25. lowtech redneck Coolidge

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: Frankly, I don’t trust the American public.

    That sounds like a quote from our elites.

    If you really cannot trust the American public, then it is game over.

    I don’t trust the American people…..but I trust unaccountable politicians and bureaucrats a lot less. That’s the rub. Its not game over, just the same tragedy that conservatives of a classical liberal bent have always had to deal with.

    Of course, the problem is worse now that half the country (and most of the ‘ruling class’) considers anti-Americanism and ‘woke’ racism and sexism to be virtues, which they must inflict on others.

    • #25
    • October 10, 2019, at 12:43 PM PST
    • 6 likes
  26. MarciN Member

    For the average kindergarten teacher in a small town, it’s just not possible to follow the headlines to their original sources. She’s got twenty-six kids in her classroom and would prefer to have only ten. She has so much on her mind every day that politics seems far away and irrelevant.

    I don’t fault the American people for not following these stories more closely. And the Democratic Party’s grip on the mainstream media makes the situation even worse. I can’t help thinking sometimes that they are being unclear on purpose. When Hillary Clinton was trying to reform health care during her husband’s administration, it was nearly impossible to keep track of the proposals. Clearly their strategy was to confuse and conquer. :-) Nothing has changed since then.

    I can see how we got to Twitter politics. It will be the dominant force in the next election. We simply have to make it part of our political calculations.

    • #26
    • October 10, 2019, at 12:53 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  27. Samuel Block Member

    I do, but not for the reason that most people say they do. The collective has a way of sorting itself in a way which, even if seems flawed to a given individual, is entirely without mistake.

    For instance: There’s an experiment that found if you have a large number of people trying to guess the number of gum balls in a big container, the average of all guesses will be closer to the actual number than any individual guess. 

    The demographic that is most important today, is the one that nobody talks about. The politically apathetic. These are mostly young people, but there are a lot of Baby Boomers in this cohort as well. Though most of these people would vote Democrat if they voted, their general disillusionment with partisan scheming keeps them out of the game. Some are divorced men, some video gamers, some are genuine hippy eccentrics – but all of them just stay out of the fray.

    The point is, the game is still live because these people have been sitting it out. If the Right can’t capitalize on this, then it’ll be us you shouldn’t trust. 

    • #27
    • October 10, 2019, at 1:16 PM PST
    • 1 like
  28. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    lowtech redneck (View Comment):
    I don’t trust the American people…..but I trust unaccountable politicians and bureaucrats a lot less.

    Well-said, @lowtech-redneck. And your other points, too!

    • #28
    • October 10, 2019, at 1:26 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  29. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    MarciN (View Comment):
    For the average kindergarten teacher in a small town, it’s just not possible to follow the headlines to their original sources. She’s got twenty-six kids in her classroom and would prefer to have only ten. She has so much on her mind every day that politics seems far away and irrelevant.

    I don’t disagree, @marcin. But how are we to be responsible citizens when we vote? It’s a dilemma.

    • #29
    • October 10, 2019, at 1:28 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  30. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn Post author

    Samuel Block (View Comment):

    I do, but not for the reason that most people say they do. The collective has a way of sorting itself in a way which, even if seems flawed to a given individual, is entirely without mistake.

    For instance: There’s an experiment that found if you have a large number of people trying to guess the number of gum balls in a big container, the average of all guesses will be closer to the actual number than any individual guess.

    The demographic that is most important today, is the one that nobody talks about. The politically apathetic. These are mostly young people, but there are a lot of Baby Boomers in this cohort as well. Though most of these people would vote Democrat if they voted, their general disillusionment with partisan scheming keeps them out of the game. Some are divorced men, some video gamers, some are genuine hippy eccentrics – but all of them just stay out of the fray.

    The point is, the game is still live because these people have been sitting it out. If the Right can’t capitalize on this, then it’ll be us you shouldn’t trust.

    Interesting information, @samuelblock. I hadn’t thought about those who were simply unengaged and didn’t vote. But I have no idea how the Right should capitalize on it! Thoughts?

    • #30
    • October 10, 2019, at 1:30 PM PST
    • Like
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