The 2020 Referendum on the Murderers of Truth

 

I think it became clear to me in my formative years, that beyond good writing and bad writing, there was a style of writing that was meant to obscure. As a fine arts and graphic design student in college, I would sometimes try to decipher the convoluted gibberish about Abstract Expressionism in pretentious magazines like ArtForum and eventually give up, concluding that, either there were human beings (who, for the most part, lived in New York) so vastly superior in intellect than I or that this was all just a load of crap.

The late, great Tom Wolfe wrote a book, The Painted Word, about the pseudo-intellectual poseurs of the New York art scene who pushed great loads of self-indulgent and plainly awful art down the throats of Americans who couldn’t make heads or tails of it and those museum curators and collectors eager to be relevant. As he put it:

There were brave and patriotic collectors who created a little flurry of activity on the Abstract Expressionist market in the late 1950s, but in general this type of painting was depreciating faster than a Pontiac Bonneville once it left the showroom. The resale market was a shambles. Without the museums to step in here and there, to buy in the name of history, Abstract Expressionism was becoming a real beached whale commercially. The deep-down mutter-to-myself truth was that the collectors, despite their fervent desire to be virtuous, had never been able to build up any gusto for Abstract Expressionism. Somehow that six-flight walk up the spiral staircase of Theory took the wind out of you.

In this time, amazing painters like Andrew Wyeth were dismissed and ridiculed while someone like Jackson Pollock who piddled paint on vast canvases was raised to godlike status.

Painting is a form of language. Some do it well and others piddle. Some paint to delve into the human psyche and explore nature, others just keep dumping buckets of paint on top of other layers of paint making an unholy mess. Language is the one tool that human beings have to help make sense of the world or as Jordan Peterson has related in his analysis of the Book of Genesis, the Logos (the Word) that brought order out of chaos. It’s what we use to understand the world around us in all of its mystery, strangeness, its beauty, love, or its horror and rampant monstrous evil.

There are those, of course, who don’t use language to enlighten. Like the pseudo-intelligentsia of the New York art world of the 1960s and ’70s, some use language to obscure and to obliterate in an effort to institute conformity to a specific ideology or worldview. In this effort the term, ‘painted word’ can be applied to political discourse with new definitions of once understood and agreed-upon words that now masquerade and sashay as something they are not, and often what they truly are is viler.

This can be done by dressing up a word with lipstick, rouge, eye-shadow and costume jewelry (not to ‘drag’ out the metaphor) by appending a word like ‘socialism’ with the word ‘democratic’ to make it somehow sound more alluring, sexy, and attractive even though any study of actual socialist regimes throughout 20th-century history will indicate immediately that they were anything but democratic. One could more aptly define ‘democratic socialism’ as property theft, slavery, and societal suicide-by-consensus.

Other words have been ascribed definitions opposite to their original meaning. Words still used by virtually everyone on both sides of the political spectrum like “liberal” or “progressive” when it’s clear there is nothing liberal or progressive in the liberalism and progressivism as espoused by those on the Left and, in fact, what lies behind these terms are Marxism, communism, socialism, totalitarianism, subjugation, and slavery. Thus, abortion, the deliberate termination of growing and viable human life is called a “reproductive” right when reproduction is the direct opposite aim of abortion. When was the last time you heard a news anchor challenge a pro-abortion advocate on the use of the term “reproductive” as it is used in “reproductive right,” in any interview?

There are those on the right of the political spectrum who accept the Leftist or ‘woke’ lexicon out of resignation or acquiescence, as they have done with “liberal” and “progressive.” The cowardice of news anchors and commentators who shrink from calling out a politician’s progressive policy ideas as Marxist or communist if they are, doesn’t help matters and only serves to prolong the obliteration of language and truth. Or to perhaps recklessly paraphrase Tom Wolfe, “Without those willing to step in here and there, to discredit the dishonesty of the Leftist lexicon, America will become the beached whale of a once free and prosperous republic.”

More often, it’s people in business who are ordered to help peddle the obliteration of language and continue the attacks on reality. Hence, we see an ever-expanding propaganda effort by companies like Audi, Gillette, Target, Blue Shield, various travel websites, Google, Apple, Twitter, and many others that spend precious marketing dollars pushing the feminization of men, Pride parade-sponsored floats, the notion that men can get pregnant and have babies, that young boys dressing as drag queens and posing with virtually naked transsexual men is something to be celebrated, and those behavioral choices once categorized as psychological disorders — without any apparent dissension in the corporate ranks.

Are there groups in these companies upset with the constant woke militancy of their executives and HR departments? Questioning or challenging LGBTQ rights, a woman’s right to choose, Climate Chaos, and any number of so-called “woke” initiatives by one’s company – even during non-work hours on social media platforms like Facebook or LinkedIn – can result in public shaming or immediate termination, so the woke propaganda is likely to continue. Diversity, as promoted by corporate HR departments, really only pertains to skin color or ethnic background. Diversity of thought is verboten and punishable. Ask James Damore.

Attacks on the meaning of words are ultimately attacks on reality and truth. If you believe that men can be women or that women can be men, then you are complicit in the obliteration of language and of truth. If enough people accept these lies as truth, chaos will follow.

Most, if not all of the Democrat politicians running for the presidency this election season – and there is a boatload — have also been cowed into conformity to the woke, so much so, that they’re afraid of leaving out any presumed historically-marginalized identity group to the point of abject lunacy in accepting notions that are not just delusional but outright lies. Thus, in an effort to one-up his competitors on the debate stage, Julian Castro declared (emphasis mine):

“I don’t believe only in reproductive freedom, I believe in reproductive justice,” said the former secretary of Housing and Urban Development. “What that means is just because a woman or, let’s also not forget, someone in the trans community — a trans female — is poor does not mean they should not have the ability to exercise that right to choose.

To be clear, a trans female is a man, a biological male. A biological male cannot get pregnant. It follows then, that a biological male cannot have an abortion, unless he’s having an appendix aborted or aborting a kidney stone through his penis and pretending that it’s a human child — which may sound far-fetched and ridiculous today, but in a world where Leftists believe that human fetuses are parasites, may eventually be an accepted formulation.

Castro’s desperate idiocy takes the satire of Monty Python even further than they went in their film, The Life of Brian when the character of Stan, an anti-Roman, Jewish revolutionary (played by Eric Idle) wanted to be called Loretta and simply wanted to have babies. Castro, and the throngs of people in the debate forum audience who raucously applauded Castro’s blatant idiotic pandering, are openly declaring their willingness to accept and promulgate a lie about a universal human truth and that should set off alarm bells for any sane American.

Other than organized boycotts of companies that push this nonsense, that typically have sporadic success, there is still one place where someone who wants to voice his or her objection to this constant barrage of vile extremism without fear of, or actual, retribution — and that’s the ballot box — that is, to the degree, that elections can’t be stolen through schemes like vote harvesting and other more blatantly criminal methods.

The 2020 presidential election is destined to pit a rather boorish, endlessly boasting, self-absorbed billionaire-turned-politician against a career Democrat politician, who has never run a company and had to meet payroll or even comprehends what it means to ‘create’ wealth. It seems, after watching the first two Democrat debates, that the final nominee will be either compelled or even eager to appease the more extreme fringes of the American electorate who embrace and celebrate property theft through socialist policies, abortion even to the point of infanticide, the militant LGBTQ agenda, or accept the notion that the planet will come to a cataclysmic end in 12 years if Americans haven’t heeded the advice of young congresswoman of dubious learning — making it much easier for many Americans to pull the lever for Mr. Trump than they were in 2016 — because the alternative is utter insanity.

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There are 32 comments.

  1. 1
  2. 2
  1. KentForrester Coolidge

    Boy this is a good essay, Brian. I wish I had written it. 

    I’ve long been annoyed by avant-garde art, painting in particular. I too have read Wolfe’s “The Painted Word,” which is a brilliant dissection of the New York art scene. We need another Tom Wolfe in these dark days of Democratic politicians whose only goal seems to be to out-pander one another. Wolfe would eviscerate them. 

    A long time ago, I wrote a couple of essays that were essentially, in a satiric mode, what you wrote in the opening paragraphs of your post. In fact, you drift into a satiric mode yourself occasionally. It’s hard not to. The subject is ripe for satire. 

    You’re right that Artforum is full of pompous, obscure prose. But it was only one of many art reviews that spewed out a bunch of pretentious nonsense. 

    You’ve written a really good essay, Brian, one of the best I’ve read on Ricochet. 

     

    • #1
    • June 29, 2019, at 3:14 PM PDT
    • 14 likes
  2. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt Post author

    KentForrester (View Comment):

    Boy this is a good essay, Brian. I wish I had written it.

    I’ve long been annoyed by avant-garde art, painting in particular. I too have read Wolfe’s “The Painted Word,” which is a brilliant dissection of the New York art scene. We need another Tom Wolfe in these dark days of Democratic politicians whose only goal seems to be to out-pander one another. Wolfe would eviscerate them.

    A long time ago, I wrote a couple of essays that were essentially, in a satiric mode, what you wrote in the opening paragraphs of your post. In fact, you drift into a satiric mode yourself occasionally. It’s hard not to. The subject is ripe for satire.

    You’re right that Artforum is full of pompous, obscure prose. But it was only one of many art reviews that spewed out a bunch of pretentious nonsense.

    You’ve written a really good essay, Brian, one of the best I’ve read on Ricochet.

     

    Thanks, Kent. I do admit to satiric drifting. It’s an affliction. Cheers.

    • #2
    • June 29, 2019, at 3:57 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
  3. Al French, sad sack Member

    KentForrester (View Comment):

    Boy this is a good essay, Brian. I wish I had written it.

    I’ve long been annoyed by avant-garde art, painting in particular. I too have read Wolfe’s “The Painted Word,” which is a brilliant dissection of the New York art scene. We need another Tom Wolfe in these dark days of Democratic politicians whose only goal seems to be to out-pander one another. Wolfe would eviscerate them.

    A long time ago, I wrote a couple of essays that were essentially, in a satiric mode, what you wrote in the opening paragraphs of your post. In fact, you drift into a satiric mode yourself occasionally. It’s hard not to. The subject is ripe for satire.

    You’re right that Artforum is full of pompous, obscure prose. But it was only one of many art reviews that spewed out a bunch of pretentious nonsense.

    You’ve written a really good essay, Brian, one of the best I’ve read on Ricochet.

     

    High praise indeed.

    • #3
    • June 29, 2019, at 5:39 PM PDT
    • 8 likes
  4. Kay of MT Member

    Thank you Brian for validating my thoughts on the subject. The garbage that has been spewing out for the last 50 years makes me sick. It was so bad, I started drawing and painting my own.

    • #4
    • June 29, 2019, at 6:47 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
  5. USAhafan Member

    This is outstanding. Thank you for expressing the truth so succinctly. I want to share your essay with everybody.

    • #5
    • June 29, 2019, at 7:10 PM PDT
    • 6 likes
  6. James Gawron Thatcher

    Brian Watt: It seems, after watching the first two Democrat debates, that the final nominee will be either compelled or even eager to appease the more extreme fringes of the American electorate who embrace and celebrate property theft through socialist policies, abortion even to the point of infanticide, the militant LGBTQ agenda, or accept the notion that the planet will come to a cataclysmic end in 12 years if Americans haven’t heeded the advice of young congresswoman of dubious learning — making it much easier for many Americans to pull the lever for Mr. Trump than they were in 2016 — because the alternative is utter insanity.

    Brian,

    Agreed.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #6
    • June 29, 2019, at 7:30 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  7. Western Chauvinist Member

    Celebrate Perversity! And, no, that’s not a request, it’s a command.

    • #7
    • June 29, 2019, at 8:20 PM PDT
    • 13 likes
  8. Stad Thatcher

    Brian Watt: In this time, amazing painters like Andrew Wyeth were dismissed and ridiculed while someone like Jackson Pollock who piddled paint on vast canvases was raised to god-like status.

    In Ayn Rand’s novel The Fountainhead, the antagonist Ellsworth Toohey makes this statement as part of his long “How To Rule Souls” speech:

    “Kill man’s sense of values. Kill his capacity to recognize greatness or to achieve it. Great men can’t be ruled. We don’t want any great men. Don’t deny conception of greatness. Destroy it from within. The great is the rare, the difficult, the exceptional. Set up standards of achievement open to all, to the least, to the most inept—and you stop the impetus to effort in men, great or small. You stop all incentive to improvement, to excellence, to perfection. . . . Don’t set out to raze all shrines—you’ll frighten men, Enshrine mediocrity – and the shrines are razed. “

    The last sentence sums up most modern art these days, but Toohey’s statement (in context) covered everything—art, literature, the press, architecture, the theater . . . you name it. While the entire speech is about forcing collectivism on mankind, one of the mechanisms is to make the bad great and the great bad.

    • #8
    • June 30, 2019, at 5:31 AM PDT
    • 10 likes
  9. Susan Quinn Contributor

    Excellent post, Brian. Depressing, but excellent.

    • #9
    • June 30, 2019, at 11:00 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  10. Caryn Member

    I agree with all of the praise this piece has received, Brian, and hope it is promoted to wider readership and commentary. It’s unfortunate how often really good posts slip by on lower traffic days. I’m forwarding a link to this post to my husband, who will surely like to participate in the discussion as it applies to art, but commend it for the broader point about the misuse of language. With that in mind, I recommend to all (as I’ve done repeatedly) the excellent and timeless book by Melanie Phillips, The World Turned Upside Down. The book is nearly ten years old, yet still spot on and up to date. If you have an hour-and-a-half to spare, here’s a link to her giving a talk about the subject. I haven’t listened to it all, but am about to sign out of here and do so.

    • #10
    • June 30, 2019, at 1:40 PM PDT
    • 8 likes
  11. Dr. Bastiat Member

    Outstanding essay. Thanks.

    • #11
    • June 30, 2019, at 3:09 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  12. Basil Fawlty Member

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    Celebrate Perversity! And, no, that’s not a request, it’s a command.

    A man date?

    • #12
    • June 30, 2019, at 3:17 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  13. Steven Seward Member

    The Modern Art World was way ahead of its time in regards to the use of obfuscatory and BS language. I had a painting professor in art school who would “critique” students work. He knew all the verbiage and catchy phrases about art and could string together the most extraordinary sentences that baffled the mind. It would go something like this:

    “Your tectonic surfaces mesh with the oblique tangent within the secular phase of the painting, making a bombastic statement about the inherent social constructivism of the mass tones.”

    I would watch students nod their heads in agreement as he was babbling on, and I got the impression that they had no idea what he was talking about. They were just trying to look knowledgeable. This teacher never touched a paintbrush or pencil during the entire school year, and never once corrected any students work. He just talked. I would not have known that he knew how to paint at all except that he once showed us some slides of his work. They were acrylic paintings of vibrating figures with their internal guts and organs hanging out. He said one art critic described his paintings as “visceral.”

    I actually liked the guy because he was colorful and personable, but I didn’t learn a damn thing in his class.

    • #13
    • June 30, 2019, at 8:32 PM PDT
    • 10 likes
  14. Western Chauvinist Member

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    The Modern Art World was way ahead of its time in regards to the use of obfuscatory and BS language. I had a painting professor in art school who would “critique” students work. He knew all the verbiage and catchy phrases about art and could string together the most extraordinary sentences that baffled the mind. It would go something like this:

    “Your tectonic surfaces mesh with the oblique tangent within the secular phase of the painting, making a bombastic statement about the inherent social constructivism of the mass tones.”

    I would watch students nod their heads in agreement as he was babbling on, and I got the impression that they had no idea what he was talking about. They were just trying to look knowledgeable. This teacher never touched a paintbrush or pencil during the entire school year, and never once corrected any students work. He just talked. I would not have known that he knew how to paint at all except that he once showed us some slides of his work. They were acrylic paintings of vibrating figures with their internal guts and organs hanging out. He said one art critic described his paintings as “visceral.”

    I actually liked the guy because he was colorful and personable, but I didn’t learn a damn thing in his class.

    Have you watched the new Civilizations series? In the last episode, the interviewer speaks to a black woman artist who grew up within view of Stone Mountain. They talk about the lingering racism in America and show her paintings(?). They’re primitive black on white depictions of whites abusing blacks, including graphic depictions of sodomy and other forms of torture. And it’s called “art.” I call it victim pornography. 

    • #14
    • June 30, 2019, at 8:40 PM PDT
    • 8 likes
  15. Steven Seward Member

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):Have you watched the new Civilizations series? In the last episode, the interviewer speaks to a black woman artist who grew up within view of Stone Mountain. They talk about the lingering racism in America and show her paintings(?). They’re primitive black on white depictions of whites abusing blacks, including graphic depictions of sodomy and other forms of torture. And it’s called “art.” I call it victim pornography.

    No, I have not seen this series, but I can imagine. I have seen so much crap that is called “art” that I have gotten numb to it. I like your term “victim pornography!”

     

    • #15
    • June 30, 2019, at 9:36 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  16. Caryn Member

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    The Modern Art World was way ahead of its time in regards to the use of obfuscatory and BS language. I had a painting professor in art school who would “critique” students work. He knew all the verbiage and catchy phrases about art and could string together the most extraordinary sentences that baffled the mind. It would go something like this:

    “Your tectonic surfaces mesh with the oblique tangent within the secular phase of the painting, making a bombastic statement about the inherent social constructivism of the mass tones.”

    I would watch students nod their heads in agreement as he was babbling on, and I got the impression that they had no idea what he was talking about. They were just trying to look knowledgeable. This teacher never touched a paintbrush or pencil during the entire school year, and never once corrected any students work. He just talked. I would not have known that he knew how to paint at all except that he once showed us some slides of his work. They were acrylic paintings of vibrating figures with their internal guts and organs hanging out. He said one art critic described his paintings as “visceral.”

    I actually liked the guy because he was colorful and personable, but I didn’t learn a damn thing in his class.

    Have you watched the new Civilizations series? In the last episode, the interviewer speaks to a black woman artist who grew up within view of Stone Mountain. They talk about the lingering racism in America and show her paintings(?). They’re primitive black on white depictions of whites abusing blacks, including graphic depictions of sodomy and other forms of torture. And it’s called “art.” I call it victim pornography.

    We went to a presentation on “Transgressive Art” some years ago. The speaker showed black and white slides of the Chinese torture technique of “death by a thousand cuts.” It was horrific. I was convinced the man–an art “professor”–was a sadist taking a perverse pleasure in seeing how far he could push the audience. He referenced some website with crime scene or accident site photos and suggested that it was the kind of thing that many of us would be rushing to look at (it isn’t). This was before beheading porn became all the rage. I’m sure he loved it. We were guests of the benefactors of the presentation, so couldn’t make the kind of walk-out scene I wanted to, but we did share our feelings with the benefactor’s husband. Gently, as he was a client. He seemed as horrified as we were, IIRC.

    • #16
    • June 30, 2019, at 10:17 PM PDT
    • 10 likes
  17. JamesSalerno Coolidge

    Going to school for Fine Arts almost killed my passion for illustration. I remember being a freshman and watching a classmate nail condoms and sheet metal onto a dirty canvas and passing with flying colors. Or another classmate sleeping outside all day with a poem on his chest. Then showing up for class the next day with a hideous sunburn, for…. reasons. Don’t mind me, I’m just over here drawing my cityscapes…

     

    • #17
    • July 1, 2019, at 12:59 AM PDT
    • 13 likes
  18. Stad Thatcher

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    The Modern Art World was way ahead of its time in regards to the use of obfuscatory and BS language. I had a painting professor in art school who would “critique” students work. He knew all the verbiage and catchy phrases about art and could string together the most extraordinary sentences that baffled the mind. It would go something like this:

    “Your tectonic surfaces mesh with the oblique tangent within the secular phase of the painting, making a bombastic statement about the inherent social constructivism of the mass tones.”

    I would watch students nod their heads in agreement as he was babbling on, and I got the impression that they had no idea what he was talking about. They were just trying to look knowledgeable. This teacher never touched a paintbrush or pencil during the entire school year, and never once corrected any students work. He just talked. I would not have known that he knew how to paint at all except that he once showed us some slides of his work. They were acrylic paintings of vibrating figures with their internal guts and organs hanging out. He said one art critic described his paintings as “visceral.”

    I actually liked the guy because he was colorful and personable, but I didn’t learn a damn thing in his class.

    Have you watched the new Civilizations series? In the last episode, the interviewer speaks to a black woman artist who grew up within view of Stone Mountain. They talk about the lingering racism in America and show her paintings(?). They’re primitive black on white depictions of whites abusing blacks, including graphic depictions of sodomy and other forms of torture. And it’s called “art.” I call it victim pornography.

    I’m reminded of the other paintings by the guy who did the Obamas’ official portraits. Some of his paintings depicted black women holding the severed heads of white women, swords and knives dripping blood . . .

    • #18
    • July 1, 2019, at 6:16 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  19. Steven Seward Member

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    Going to school for Fine Arts almost killed my passion for illustration. I remember being a freshman and watching a classmate nail condoms and sheet metal onto a dirty canvas and passing with flying colors. Or another classmate sleeping outside all day with a poem on his chest. Then showing up for class the next day with a hideous sunburn, for…. reasons. Don’t mind me, I’m just over here drawing my cityscapes…

     

    Yep, I hear the same story from people who went to art schools all around the country. If Conservatives think that the state of our universities are left-wing and corrupt, they ain’t seen nothin’ yet until they’ve seen an art school. The more prestigious the school, the more egregious the program. And they cost just as much, if not more, than mainstream universities. Check out this review written by a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. Read down far enough to where he talks about being shown films of a woman being raped, and a man masturbating in a public museum. Loads of creativity there!

    • #19
    • July 1, 2019, at 7:53 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  20. Steven Seward Member

    Stad (View Comment):I’m reminded of the other paintings by the guy who did the Obamas’ official portraits. Some of his paintings depicted black women holding the severed heads of white women, swords and knives dripping blood . . .

    I’ve seen those also. The artist painted a sperm cell on Barack’s forehead (I am not making this up, he does this sort of thing). The Obamas got the portrait artists that they deserved.

    • #20
    • July 1, 2019, at 8:05 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  21. Western Chauvinist Member

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    Going to school for Fine Arts almost killed my passion for illustration. I remember being a freshman and watching a classmate nail condoms and sheet metal onto a dirty canvas and passing with flying colors. Or another classmate sleeping outside all day with a poem on his chest. Then showing up for class the next day with a hideous sunburn, for…. reasons. Don’t mind me, I’m just over here drawing my cityscapes…

     

    Yep, I hear the same story from people who went to art schools all around the country. If Conservatives think that the state of our universities are left-wing and corrupt, they ain’t seen nothin’ yet until they’ve seen an art school. The more prestigious the school, the more egregious the program. And they cost just as much, if not more, than mainstream universities. Check out this review written by a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. Read down far enough to where he talks about being shown films of a woman being raped, and a man masturbating in a public museum. Loads of creativity there!

    It’s satanic. 

    • #21
    • July 1, 2019, at 8:26 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  22. JamesSalerno Coolidge

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    Going to school for Fine Arts almost killed my passion for illustration. I remember being a freshman and watching a classmate nail condoms and sheet metal onto a dirty canvas and passing with flying colors. Or another classmate sleeping outside all day with a poem on his chest. Then showing up for class the next day with a hideous sunburn, for…. reasons. Don’t mind me, I’m just over here drawing my cityscapes…

     

    Yep, I hear the same story from people who went to art schools all around the country. If Conservatives think that the state of our universities are left-wing and corrupt, they ain’t seen nothin’ yet until they’ve seen an art school. The more prestigious the school, the more egregious the program. And they cost just as much, if not more, than mainstream universities. Check out this review written by a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. Read down far enough to where he talks about being shown films of a woman being raped, and a man masturbating in a public museum. Loads of creativity there!

    There’s definitely an underlying theme here. Leftism doesn’t require any effort. Reward mediocrity (or complete absence of talent) by dressing it up with flowery language and pseudo-intellectualism.

    Conservative values mean you work hard to perfect your craft. You put in the time and effort. And you are offended when no-talent hacks are placed on your level. I know I was.

    • #22
    • July 1, 2019, at 8:58 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  23. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt Post author

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    Going to school for Fine Arts almost killed my passion for illustration. I remember being a freshman and watching a classmate nail condoms and sheet metal onto a dirty canvas and passing with flying colors. Or another classmate sleeping outside all day with a poem on his chest. Then showing up for class the next day with a hideous sunburn, for…. reasons. Don’t mind me, I’m just over here drawing my cityscapes…

     

    Yep, I hear the same story from people who went to art schools all around the country. If Conservatives think that the state of our universities are left-wing and corrupt, they ain’t seen nothin’ yet until they’ve seen an art school. The more prestigious the school, the more egregious the program. And they cost just as much, if not more, than mainstream universities. Check out this review written by a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. Read down far enough to where he talks about being shown films of a woman being raped, and a man masturbating in a public museum. Loads of creativity there!

    There’s definitely an underlying theme here. Leftism doesn’t require any effort. Reward mediocrity (or complete absence of talent) by dressing it up with flowery language and pseudo-intellectualism.

    Conservative values mean you work hard to perfect your craft. You put in the time and effort. And you are offended when no-talent hacks are placed on your level. I know I was.

    For those who haven’t taken fine art or graphic design classes in college, there are moments typically after the work is supposed to be complete that the class has a critique where people weigh in with their thoughts about each student’s work, most often led off by the instructor. I had some of the same experiences that James has related in my life drawing and painting classes. I was one of the two or three best draftsman, illustrators and painters in my classes but on a few occasions my work was actually ridiculed for being too good because it made other students who wanted to make “message” pieces about the environment (how Americans waste toilet paper) or American imperialism, what have you, feel frustrated and inadequate because they couldn’t render very well. One instructor even gestured to one of my better drawings by saying, “And what are we to do with crap like this?” It was a year or so later when I switched my major from fine arts to graphic design.

    • #23
    • July 1, 2019, at 9:20 AM PDT
    • 10 likes
  24. Western Chauvinist Member

    Brian Watt (View Comment):

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    Going to school for Fine Arts almost killed my passion for illustration. I remember being a freshman and watching a classmate nail condoms and sheet metal onto a dirty canvas and passing with flying colors. Or another classmate sleeping outside all day with a poem on his chest. Then showing up for class the next day with a hideous sunburn, for…. reasons. Don’t mind me, I’m just over here drawing my cityscapes…

     

    Yep, I hear the same story from people who went to art schools all around the country. If Conservatives think that the state of our universities are left-wing and corrupt, they ain’t seen nothin’ yet until they’ve seen an art school. The more prestigious the school, the more egregious the program. And they cost just as much, if not more, than mainstream universities. Check out this review written by a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. Read down far enough to where he talks about being shown films of a woman being raped, and a man masturbating in a public museum. Loads of creativity there!

    There’s definitely an underlying theme here. Leftism doesn’t require any effort. Reward mediocrity (or complete absence of talent) by dressing it up with flowery language and pseudo-intellectualism.

    Conservative values mean you work hard to perfect your craft. You put in the time and effort. And you are offended when no-talent hacks are placed on your level. I know I was.

    For those who haven’t taken fine art or graphic design classes in college, there are moments typically after the work is supposed to be complete that the class has a critique where people weigh in with their thoughts about each student’s work, most often led off by the instructor. I had some of the same experiences that James has related in my life drawing and painting classes. I was one of the two or three best draftsman, illustrators and painters in my classes but on a few occasions my work was actually ridiculed for being too good because it made other students who wanted to make “message” pieces about the environment (how Americans waste toilet paper) or American imperialism, what have you, feel frustrated and inadequate because they couldn’t render very well. One instructor even gestured to one of my better drawings by saying, “And what are we to do with crap like this?” It was a year or so later when I switched my major from fine arts to graphic design.

    Gee, Brian. I can’t “Like” that comment. Sorry that happened to you.

    • #24
    • July 1, 2019, at 9:35 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  25. Steven Seward Member

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):There’s definitely an underlying theme here. Leftism doesn’t require any effort. Reward mediocrity (or complete absence of talent) by dressing it up with flowery language and pseudo-intellectualism.

    Conservative values mean you work hard to perfect your craft. You put in the time and effort. And you are offended when no-talent hacks are placed on your level. I know I was.

    James, you are right on the money, hit the nail on the head, and knocked it out of the ball park. I’d like to give you more than one like. High standards and hard work are foreign concepts to people on the left, including the “arteests” we are talking about.

     

    • #25
    • July 1, 2019, at 12:30 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
  26. Steven Seward Member

    Brian Watt (View Comment):For those who haven’t taken fine art or graphic design classes in college, there are moments typically after the work is supposed to be complete that the class has a critique where people weigh in with their thoughts about each student’s work, most often led off by the instructor. I had some of the same experiences that James has related in my life drawing and painting classes. I was one of the two or three best draftsman, illustrators and painters in my classes but on a few occasions my work was actually ridiculed for being too good because it made other students who wanted to make “message” pieces about the environment (how Americans waste toilet paper) or American imperialism, what have you, feel frustrated and inadequate because they couldn’t render very well. One instructor even gestured to one of my better drawings by saying, “And what are we to do with crap like this?” It was a year or so later when I switched my major from fine arts to graphic design.

    Didn’t you know that realism was passe′? The relevant styles for our times are Cubism, Dadaism, Abstract Expressionism, and Social Realism, not to mention Priapism and Botulism!? (Just kidding…. only about the first four)

    For some fun with modern art, watch this! (Video is not CoC Compliant)

     

     

    • #26
    • July 1, 2019, at 12:49 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  27. James Gawron Thatcher

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Brian Watt (View Comment):For those who haven’t taken fine art or graphic design classes in college, there are moments typically after the work is supposed to be complete that the class has a critique where people weigh in with their thoughts about each student’s work, most often led off by the instructor. I had some of the same experiences that James has related in my life drawing and painting classes. I was one of the two or three best draftsman, illustrators and painters in my classes but on a few occasions my work was actually ridiculed for being too good because it made other students who wanted to make “message” pieces about the environment (how Americans waste toilet paper) or American imperialism, what have you, feel frustrated and inadequate because they couldn’t render very well. One instructor even gestured to one of my better drawings by saying, “And what are we to do with crap like this?” It was a year or so later when I switched my major from fine arts to graphic design.

    Didn’t you know that realism was passe′? The relevant styles for our times are Cubism, Dadaism, Abstract Expressionism, and Social Realism, not to mention Priapism and Botulism!? (Just kidding…. only about the first four)

    For some fun with modern art, watch this!

     

     

    Steven,

    As usual, my young favorite Paul is over the top. However, for the last 75 years “Modern Art” has been out of control. It’s loud pretentious arrogance and near worthless content has drowned out every other form of art. Thus Modern Art has earned every single slap in the face that Paul is dishing out ten times over.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #27
    • July 1, 2019, at 6:21 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  28. Steven Seward Member

    James Gawron (View Comment):Steven,

    As usual, my young favorite Paul is over the top. However, for the last 75 years “Modern Art” has been out of control. It’s loud pretentious arrogance and near worthless content has drowned out every other form of art. Thus Modern Art has earned every single slap in the face that Paul is dishing out ten times over.

    Regards,

    Jim

    Agreed! Paul Watson is kind of outrageous, but the object of his scorn is well deserving. The modern art kerfuffle is a natural outgrowth of our sensationalist-oriented media. The overwhelming majority of art being produced these days is actually the old-fashioned variety whose ideal is beauty. You wouldn’t know it from watching and reading news stories because pretty much all they report on is the outlandish garbage, and the more grotesque, the better.

    • #28
    • July 1, 2019, at 6:39 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  29. CarolJoy, Above Top Secret Coolidge

    Back in the Nineties, a friend asked me to go and look at a property that he ws considering renting somewhere in Marin. He was a busy computer professional and didn’t want to look the place over himself unless I thought he’d like it.

    I arrived at the pleasant 2 bedroom property. The woman tenant offered me a tour of the place. Her one stipulation was that I should wait while she finished her thesis for her getting her Masters in Fine Arts.

    Her project consisted of carefully dropping bits of paint onto 24 separate pieces of very old linoleum tiles. These bits of linoleum were the sort of thing a college kid might have had in their bathroom if they couldn’t afford to live somewhere nice. The blobs of paint were either red, or blue or pink

    In less than five minutes she had finished 8 of the 24 pieces of tile. After concluding her work on piece number 8, she said with some sympathy: “This is taking longer than I thought. Let’s have you tour the place and I’ll finish the rest once you leave.”

    It was around this time my son had to decide if he wanted to pursue an art degree at college or go with engineering. I was really glad when he decided to go with engineering.

    • #29
    • July 1, 2019, at 7:00 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
  30. OmegaPaladin Moderator

    I agree 100% with the sentiments here.

    @stevenseward – Please let people know if a video is not CoC compliant in the future.

    • #30
    • July 1, 2019, at 7:05 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
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