Such a Wonderful Place

 

A social media conversation between two good and trustworthy friends:

Native Californian (emigrated to TN) on a visit back home:

So I’m just coming out of Ross in Castro Valley going to my car and I hear alarm bells going off and a woman yelling “Where’s my car? Where’s my car” (I assume she was referring to her getaway car) and someone else was yelling “Somebody stop her” and I see a woman run by with an arm full of suitcases and the security guards at Ross just standing there watching her.

Relative who has also emigrated to TN: 

Yep they’re not allowed to chase outside the store.

Native Californian (emigrated to TN) on a visit back home:

I saw the thief in the store and I thought, “Wow she has a lot of stuff” and there was another woman outside who kept yelling “Call 911, call the cops! Why are they just standing there watching!”

Relative who has also emigrated to TN:

Because if they hurt the thief they can be sued by said thief.

Native Californian (emigrated to TN) on a visit back home:

I know! The world is crazy now.

Relative who has also emigrated to TN:

Yep but that is mostly California; other states they can’t sue you.

Native Californian (emigrated to TN) on a visit back home:

Well we know from living here so many years that CA is special and not in a good way. Although they do have the best weather in the Union.

Another native Californian:

‪I have seen that happen numerous times. It kind of makes me mad. The store managers at Safeway watched as a couple guys stuffed bottles of liquor in their pants and jackets, at least 12 total. They just walked out. I watched a guy at Kohls with arms full of stuff walk out of line and out the door. Nobody says a word. It caused/es me to have a lot of conversations in my head and ultimately with God.

…………..

I am not surprised in California – or, I suppose, it could be possible in Seattle or Portland. But what about the rest of the country? Are you safe if you can just get out the door?

There are 9 comments.

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  1. PHCheese Inactive
    PHCheese
    @PHCheese

    I have a friend that retired from the NH state police. He came to Charleston SC and got bored and took a job at Lowes as head of store security. He quit after a few months because he couldn’t really stop anyone from stealing. He also quickly found out the employees were the biggest thieves.

    • #1
  2. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    PHCheese (View Comment):

    I have a friend that retired from the NH state police. He came to Charleston SC and got bored and took a job at Lowes as head of store security. He quit after a few months because he couldn’t really stop anyone from stealing. He also quickly found out the employees were the biggest thieves.

    I’d heard that 40% of theft is in-house. 

    Makes you wonder what the mark-up is for the honest purchasers. 

    • #2
  3. Songwriter Inactive
    Songwriter
    @user_19450

    It’s insane.  My father was a retailer in Texas in the 1960s-1980s.  He hired a retired Texas State Trooper (a detective) to run his security and bust shoplifters.  The man was like a hawk seeking out prey.

    • #3
  4. Slow on the uptake Thatcher
    Slow on the uptake
    @Chuckles

    Songwriter (View Comment):

    It’s insane. My father was a retailer in Texas in the 1960s-1980s. He hired a retired Texas State Trooper (a detective) to run his security and bust shoplifters. The man was like a hawk seeking out prey.

    I got to thinking:  Miranda decision was in 1966, and I know for a fact that it wasn’t the way things worked in at least some part of South Texas for some time after that.  (Never mind how I know.)  

    • #4
  5. inkathoots Inactive
    inkathoots
    @KathleenPetersen

    TBA (View Comment):

    PHCheese (View Comment):

    I have a friend that retired from the NH state police. He came to Charleston SC and got bored and took a job at Lowes as head of store security. He quit after a few months because he couldn’t really stop anyone from stealing. He also quickly found out the employees were the biggest thieves.

    I’d heard that 40% of theft is in-house.

    Makes you wonder what the mark-up is for the honest purchasers.

    About 15-20 years ago, my brother worked for a Home Depot in the Las Vegas area. He related the theft techniques used by employees he worked with who had been apprehended. He also informed me that his particular store factored $1M in their yearly budget for all theft.

    Yes, those of us who do not steal pay for theft.

    Another thought: Maybe the reason Amazon has been so successful is that thieves find it more difficult to walk out of “the store”  – and…they cage their employees? 

    • #5
  6. Cow Girl Thatcher
    Cow Girl
    @CowGirl

    inkathoots (View Comment):
    About 15-20 years ago, my brother worked for a Home Depot in the Las Vegas area. He related the theft techniques used by employees he worked with who had been apprehended. He also informed me that his particular store factored $1M in their yearly budget for all theft.

    This detail would shock me except that after living here in Las Vegas for about a decade, I’ve come to realize that there is a faction of society who use theft, deceit, and greed as a way of life—and that is in my neighborhood nowhere near the big casinos!! 

    I am astounded at the people whose purpose is to just steal whatever they can from whoever they can steal it from! There is no concept in their minds about ownership, or honor, or anything! It is like YOU are the fool if you don’t act this way, too. I teach their kids…that’s why I know this happens. Oh, and the fact that there is so much theft everywhere in our neighborhoods.

    Sigh…

    • #6
  7. Slow on the uptake Thatcher
    Slow on the uptake
    @Chuckles

    This is about Seattle.  I didn’t put it in the OP because it’s an hour long but it shows everything talked about in these comments.  At one place they interview a fellow who has decided to live on the street, and to finance his drugs by stealing and he thinks its a great way to live.  And the cops are helpless.  Seattle is dying

    • #7
  8. Chris Campion Coolidge
    Chris Campion
    @ChrisCampion

    So security can’t stop them outside the store, but can they just punch them in the head, really hard, and let them go with their stolen belongings?

    I think that’s fair.

    • #8
  9. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Slow on the uptake: I am not surprised in California – or, I suppose, it could be possible in Seattle or Portland. But what about the rest of the country? Are you safe if you can just get out the door?

    Not here in South Carolina.  I suppose there are some stores which have a no-chase policy, but I’m not aware of any . . .

    • #9

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