Compassion in Deed

 

There are those who mouth pieties about compassion. Former president George W. Bush comes to mind, perhaps because he made such a point, with his father, of distinguishing himself from that mean man (according to all the best sort of people) Ronald Reagan. Bush 41 touted “a thousand points of light,” and backhanded Reagan with his inauguration address. Bush 43 proclaimed himself a “compassionate conservative.”

“I call my philosophy and approach compassionate conservatism. It is compassionate to actively help our fellow citizens in need. It is conservative to insist on responsibility and results. And with this hopeful approach, we will make a real difference in people’s lives.”

Grant Bush 43 this: he effectively used U.S. taxpayer dollars to make a real difference in the public health of Africa. He seriously addressed HIV infection rates there. Of course, he did less than nothing for Christians in the Middle East, bringing catastrophe upon them while mouthing pieties. And he subverted any real move to secure our southern border, while sending our military everywhere else and working with Congress to exponentially grow the surveillance state. Whatever it took to keep the lid on American workers’ wages, in service of the Chamber of Commerce.

Real compassion is not found in phrases, or postures, but in deeds, as James wrote about faith:

But someone will say, “You have faith and I have works.” Show me your faith apart from your works, and I will show you my faith by my works.

(James 2:18, English Standard Version)

Here is what real compassion for Americans looks like:

It was not a Bush, nor a Clinton, nor “the one we’ve been waiting for,” who actually took the political risk to truly, decisively act. This action is another thread in the fabric of promises kept to remember those Americans who were forgotten by the powers that be, by the bipartisan political machine. If we actually seek to enforce immigration law, and if we really expand domestic employment opportunities, then we will need to bring back in people we used to exclude. We will need to give a second chance for employment to people who we first held accountable for crimes.

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  1. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):
    t’s because we killed them if they didn’t stop.

    I agree. And Japan and Germany did not become somewhat democratic out of self-realization. They were conquered and rebuilt.

    That’s nor the way I’ve read the history. The New Dealers would have liked to rebuild them from scratch, along socialist lines, but realities intervened and we had to let them rebuild using existing structures, in part because of the Soviet threat.

    Konrad Adenauer certainly was key in resisting the Socialist preferences of our Diplomatic Corps, but could not have accomplished what he did without the occupation army. MacArthur basically dictated the Japanese constitution.

    All true, but the Japanese were allowed to re-install their industrial leaders, much to the dismay of the New Dealers. I forget just how this interacted with MacArthur’s role. I had it in my head when we were discussing it on Ricochet a few years ago, and have now forgotten the details.

    • #31
  2. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):
    t’s because we killed them if they didn’t stop.

    I agree. And Japan and Germany did not become somewhat democratic out of self-realization. They were conquered and rebuilt.

    That’s nor the way I’ve read the history. The New Dealers would have liked to rebuild them from scratch, along socialist lines, but realities intervened and we had to let them rebuild using existing structures, in part because of the Soviet threat.

    Konrad Adenauer certainly was key in resisting the Socialist preferences of our Diplomatic Corps, but could not have accomplished what he did without the occupation army. MacArthur basically dictated the Japanese constitution.

    All true, but the Japanese were allowed to re-install their industrial leaders, much to the dismay of the New Dealers. I forget just how this interacted with MacArthur’s role. I had it in my head when we were discussing it on Ricochet a few years ago, and have now forgotten the details.

    It was real parliamentary political systems that were shoved down both nation’s throats and held there by G.I.s until they could not be thrown up.

    • #32
  3. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):
    t’s because we killed them if they didn’t stop.

    I agree. And Japan and Germany did not become somewhat democratic out of self-realization. They were conquered and rebuilt.

    That’s nor the way I’ve read the history. The New Dealers would have liked to rebuild them from scratch, along socialist lines, but realities intervened and we had to let them rebuild using existing structures, in part because of the Soviet threat.

    Konrad Adenauer certainly was key in resisting the Socialist preferences of our Diplomatic Corps, but could not have accomplished what he did without the occupation army. MacArthur basically dictated the Japanese constitution.

    All true, but the Japanese were allowed to re-install their industrial leaders, much to the dismay of the New Dealers. I forget just how this interacted with MacArthur’s role. I had it in my head when we were discussing it on Ricochet a few years ago, and have now forgotten the details.

    It was real parliamentary political systems that were shoved down both nation’s throats and held there by G.I.s until they could not be thrown up.

    Our biggest failure in Iraq was in not requiring them to adopt the Bill of Rights.  We allowed them to install a violent theocracy where one had never existed.

    • #33
  4. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Skyler (View Comment):
    Our biggest failure in Iraq was in not requiring them to adopt the Bill of Rights. We allowed them to install a violent theocracy where one had never existed.

    I can’t imagine how that would have made a difference. A bill of rights can’t enforce itself.

    • #34
  5. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):
    Our biggest failure in Iraq was in not requiring them to adopt the Bill of Rights. We allowed them to install a violent theocracy where one had never existed.

    I can’t imagine how that would have made a difference. A bill of rights can’t enforce itself.

    Well, my presupposition is that we wouldn’t allow them to form a government until we had finished conquering them, and we certainly shouldn’t have allowed them to create a hostile government.   Most Iraqis wanted peace and freedom and we allowed Iran to come in and take control.

    • #35
  6. Richard Finlay Inactive
    Richard Finlay
    @RichardFinlay

    Skyler (View Comment):
    my presupposition is that we wouldn’t allow them to form a government until we had finished conquering them, and we certainly shouldn’t have allowed them to create a hostile government

    Couldn’t agree more … with how it should have been.  (See also, Japan/Germany)

    • #36
  7. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):
    my presupposition is that we wouldn’t allow them to form a government until we had finished conquering them, and we certainly shouldn’t have allowed them to create a hostile government

    Couldn’t agree more … with how it should have been. (See also, Japan/Germany)

    Thanks, but I wonder what word I meant to use other than “presupposition.”  I can’t imagine ever using such a word and I think my iPhone changed it for me.  :)

    It kind of works, though.

    • #37
  8. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Thanks, but I wonder what word I meant to use other than “presupposition.” I can’t imagine ever using such a word and I think my iPhone changed it for me. :)

    It kind of works, though.

    Gee, and I wondered why you sounded so intelligent there. 😜

    • #38
  9. Richard Finlay Inactive
    Richard Finlay
    @RichardFinlay

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Richard Finlay (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):
    my presupposition is that we wouldn’t allow them to form a government until we had finished conquering them, and we certainly shouldn’t have allowed them to create a hostile government

    Couldn’t agree more … with how it should have been. (See also, Japan/Germany)

    Thanks, but I wonder what word I meant to use other than “presupposition.” I can’t imagine ever using such a word and I think my iPhone changed it for me. :)

    It kind of works, though.

    Is there nothing Siri can’t do?  She’s there to help, right?

    • #39
  10. Instugator Thatcher
    Instugator
    @Instugator

    Skyler (View Comment):
    Thanks, but I wonder what word I meant to use other than “presupposition.”

    Presumption.

     

    • #40
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