Go Ahead and BBQ Today

 

I don’t begrudge anyone who forgets the true meaning of Memorial Day, unless they do so intentionally. In fact, the backyard barbeque is one of the ways we Americans celebrate being American. Heck, submariners are crazy enough not to need a backyard:

So go ahead, fire up the grill. As for me, I’m cooking inside. It’s too danged hot out there, and I have trouble keeping my beer cold…

Published in Military
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  1. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    One of the benefits of the Submarine Service is that once the boat is out to sea the casual look is okay. My dad and a shipmate on lookout watch during WWII. My dad is on your left in the photo.

    • #1
  2. The Great Adventure! Inactive
    The Great Adventure!
    @TheGreatAdventure

    Copying my post of 10 minutes ago on Facebook:

    I have been seeing a bunch of posts and comments this Memorial Day complaining. About how it should be only about those who were killed in combat. About how saying “Happy Memorial Day” to someone is wrong. About how we shouldn’t have barbecues or other gatherings because it isn’t sufficiently mournful.  Those who died did so to protect our right to pursue happiness. Those who served and perhaps didn’t die in combat still deserve our gratitude. Saying “Happy Memorial Day” to someone else may seem awkward, in-eloquent, but the sentiment is conveying a sense of community – that we’re all grateful for the sacrifices of others on our behalf.  And it’s okay to enjoy the day, to enjoy the company of friends and love ones. That is exactly what those brave people died to protect.

    A favorite quote:

    It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived.

    George S. Patton

    • #2
  3. Jon Gabriel, Ed. Admin
    Jon Gabriel, Ed.
    @jon

    I’ve done that! Just off the coast of Lahaina. It’s also fun to use the nose of the submarine as a slide.

    • #3
  4. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    We’re not barbecuing today, but we are making chili.  Inside.

    • #4
  5. EtCarter Inactive
    EtCarter
    @EtCarter

    Very cool. 

    Submariner cool, that is. 

    Thanks for sharing!

     

    • #5
  6. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    There’s nothing wrong with a barbecue, and nothing wrong with saying Happy Memorial Day.  But I do get annoyed when stores or people send their “thanks” to all who served.  I appreciate the sentiment, but I didn’t get killed.  Today is a special day to think of those people, and I don’t feel it is proper to dilute it.  Their deaths were usually quite gruesome, and they died while doing what our nation asked them to do.  I don’t think it’s too much to make them, rather than every Joe who  wore a uniform, the focus of the sales at the store, or the reason for the barbecue.

    • #6
  7. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    The Great Adventure! (View Comment):
    Those who died did so to protect our right to pursue happiness.

    Bingo.  I would like to think those who died would want us to celebrate with BBQs and other activities, as long as we don’t forget they sacrificed so we can . . .

    • #7
  8. I Walton Member
    I Walton
    @IWalton

    brilliant. wonderful picture, even better the thought.  

    • #8
  9. Jim George Member
    Jim George
    @JimGeorge

    My Dad was in the submarine service and was scheduled to ship out into the North Atlantic, with well known chances of survival to be near zero, the week after Armistice was declared. 

    Where are the words?

    • #9
  10. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    Jim George (View Comment):

    My Dad was in the submarine service and was scheduled to ship out into the North Atlantic, with well known chances of survival to be near zero, the week after Armistice was declared.

    Where are the words?

    This reminds me of the story my law professor told us about his father-in-law, and how excited he was to learn about benefits for WWII veterans.  He had to explain to his father-in-law, Mr. Takehara, that the benefits were for those on our side of the war.  :)  

    So which side was your dad on to have such grim chances in 1945?  :)  

    • #10
  11. RPD Inactive
    RPD
    @RPD

    My crew had to settle for the flight deck of our frigate. They call it the Steel Beach picnic.

    • #11
  12. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Think of it like Thanksgiving. Eat drink and be merry but be grateful for the sacrifices that others have made on your behalf. Throw some whisky on the lawn and say a prayer for those that didn’t return home. 

    • #12
  13. Jim George Member
    Jim George
    @JimGeorge

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Jim George (View Comment):

    My Dad was in the submarine service and was scheduled to ship out into the North Atlantic, with well known chances of survival to be near zero, the week after Armistice was declared.

    Where are the words?

    This reminds me of the story my law professor told us about his father-in-law, and how excited he was to learn about benefits for WWII veterans. He had to explain to his father-in-law, Mr. Takehara, that the benefits were for those on our side of the war. :)

    So which side was your dad on to have such grim chances in 1945? :)

    As I was about to take great umbrage at one who could even in jest question my Dad’s 100% pure red-blooded Americanism and patriotism  — our family name GEORGE might be a subtle hint as to which side we are on — I took a deep breath, thought about the correctness of your premise and then, what clinched it for me, took a look at your bio. 

    Semper Fi! I must say, aside from the unfortunate phrasing about questioning a person’s “side”– believe me, even a Marine would have paid a dear price for that had my Dad heard about it — I do see your point and simply relate to you that this has been part of the family lore as long as I can remember. So, point taken.

    But, most important, thank you for your service as one of The Few and The Proud.

    Semper Fi! Jim. 

    • #13
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