More Shutdowns, Please

 

Up now at Forbes and leading RealClearPolicy, I’m making the argument that our democracy is moribund if every law that gets passed is hardwired into the government because we’re too scared to defund it:

Elected representatives from both parties ought to break the shackles of fear-soaked propriety more often. So what if, most of the time, their push to defund will be dead on arrival? Establishment types will realize that shutdowns aren’t the horrorshows they dread. And Members of Congress will begin to understand that slavish devotion to party and budget orthodoxy serves neither their conscience nor their constituents.

The best way to shake up our calcified government and two-party system is for individual Members to band together ad hoc — or alone, if need be — to try applying the power of the purse to legislation they truly, madly, and deeply cannot abide.

From this standpoint, raising the debt ceiling is way more minor an issue than Obamacare. If a Republican really wanted to ram this point home in a theatrical way, they’d argue in favor defunding Obamacare and minting that trillion-dollar coin we keep hearing about.

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  1. Profile Photo Inactive
    @mask
    Bill Thom: Nonsense. 

    The House has the power granted by the Constitution to control spending.  You may think that shutting down the government is bad politically but it’s well within the scope of the House’s power.

    The CR is an affront to democracy.  Thousand page bills that no legislator has read or understands that cedes authority to bureaucracies is an affront to democracy.  Pushing back against it is not.

    • #1
  2. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Casey

    How about just one big long shutdown? Turn off the lights and go skiing.

    • #2
  3. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BrentB67
    Casey: How about just one big long shutdown? Turn off the lights and go skiing. · 0 minutes ago

    Count me in.

    The last thing the dems want is about 2 weeks of no federal government nonsense and the country waking up to it not being a big deal like the sequester.

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  4. Profile Photo Inactive
    @CommodoreBTC
    BrentB67

    Casey: How about just one big long shutdown? Turn off the lights and go skiing. · 0 minutes ago

    Count me in.

    The last thing the dems want is about 2 weeks of no federal government nonsense and the country waking up to it not being a big deal like the sequester. · 4 minutes ago

    yep, the chicken little talk about a shutdown is eerily similar to the panic from DC/MSM leading up to TARP and the sequester

    Dems have alot to lose if a shutdown is not seen as very painful. 

    • #4
  5. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Jordan
    BrentB67

    Casey: How about just one big long shutdown? Turn off the lights and go skiing. · 0 minutes ago

    Count me in.

    The last thing the dems want is about 2 weeks of no federal government nonsense and the country waking up to it not being a big deal like the sequester. · 11 hours ago

    I have to agree with the sentiment that the worst case scenario in the shutdown for the Big Government types is the people being fine with it, much like the sequester apocalypse that never materialized.  I imagine an extended shutdown (more than two weeks) will have people realizing that the Federal Government is operating at bare bones.  There will probably be some discomfort in some areas, but at the same time the public just might be willing to tolerate it if it meant saving hundreds of billions a year.  They might even call into question how much we pay in taxes for government services we really don’t need.

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  6. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BillThom

    Nonsense. The democrats haven’t been calcified. They occupied the capitol in Madison and have repeatedly used undemocratic means like legislators fleeing the state and trying to use fillibusters to run out the clock on the legislative calendar. The left uses tactics like this all the time. And what do we say about that. Not that they are energizing democracy, but that they are showing contempt for democracy. And we say that because it’s true. Shutting down the government to end a duly enacted law which the electorate rewarded by reelecting all of it’s prime architects, is nothing but petulance and “take the ball and go home”ism. Stopping democracy from functioning is not defense of democracy, it’s holding your breath until you turn blue.

    • #6
  7. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Kofola
    Bill Thom: Nonsense. The democrats haven’t been calcified. They occupied the capitol in Madison and have repeatedly used undemocratic means like legislators fleeing the state and trying to use fillibusters to run out the clock on the legislative calendar. The left uses tactics like this all the time. And what do we say about that. Not that they are energizing democracy, but that they are showing contempt for democracy. And we say that because it’s true. Shutting down the government to end a duly enacted law which the electorate rewarded by reelecting all of it’s prime architects, is nothing but petulance and “take the ball and go home”ism. Stopping democracy from functioning is not defense of democracy, it’s holding your breath until you turn blue. · 5 minutes ago

    Yes, because bending over and asking “please, ma’am, may I have another,” has worked out so well for the GOP…

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  8. Profile Photo Coolidge
    @MikeH

    While I think chances are more likely to hurt than help the GOP, I’m at the point where I just want to grab some popcorn and see what happens.

    Things can’t get much worse. They really can’t. We’re already headed for insolvency or forced spending reduction. There might already be nothing we can do about it. The GOP may be deluding itself that anything it does might avert catastrophe, or even get them elected.

    Most of it’s already baked in; let’s just try things and see what happens. If nothing else, it could be fun to watch.

    • #8
  9. Profile Photo Member
    @

    Sen. Harkin was right! It’s just like the break-up during the Civil War. Except for the “Civil War” part. Why, it was only 25 years ago the Democrats in Congress ramped up the high dudgeon and wanted to go to the mattresses over the “Boland Amendment,” demanding heads on pikes over alleged illegal funding of the contras. I guess the Democratic Party’s defense of the most cherished of congressional prerogatives, the power of the purse, is highly situational. Now they believe in the power of an unfettered executive to craft and shape a vast new entitlement, utterly free of congressional interference. Harry Reid won’t even countenance repeal of the medical device tax, which even his own caucus views as idiotic and destructive.

    • #9

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