Insulting Jews Everywhere—A Call to Congress

 

Dear Members of Congress,

You should be embarrassed by your lack of courage regarding the anti-Semitism resolution that has been proposed, and apologize to Jews everywhere. How could you even think of changing the resolution to include every single group discriminated against? I am insulted and disgusted by your decisions to consider these changes, since you are either politically stupid or historically uneducated. Let me explain why:

First, to equate anti-Semitism with any other group that is discriminated against is ludicrous. We are not just talking about discrimination: we are talking about centuries of murder, torture, isolation, hatred, marginalizing and rejecting the Jews. Centuries. Every other group in America pales historically in comparison in several ways. Tell me about the centuries of hatred against LGBTQ communities; explain how blacks in this country were victims of hatred in the United States more than 500 years ago (since they weren’t a slave population in this country before then). 

Second, Judaism is one basis of the founding of this country. Its values, morals and ethics have become the basis of Christianity and Islam. Isn’t it finally due some public support in our times by condemning those who would destroy or marginalize us?

Third, anti-Semitism is alive and well in almost every country in the world, whether you are talking about Europe, Asia or Africa. Jews have often been the scapegoat of choice for 4,000 years, by nearly every religion and every civilization. Unlike many other groups, I speak as a Jew who refuses to speak about being victimized; instead, I speak the truth. I acknowledge the anti-Semitism I’ve experienced, and I choose to rise above it, rather than blame all of society for this treatment. I don’t expect special favors, reparations, or any kind of compensation. I will take care of myself, thank you.

But when societies begin to show signs (including the U.S.) of increased anti-Semitic activity, I become concerned. Individual anti-Semitic acts are one thing; organized groups determined to spew their hatred on Jews, just because they are Jews. must be called out. These other groups that have been named have plenty of advocates, at political, cultural and educational levels. Where are the champions of the Jews?

I was comforted and proud that the U.S. was going to make a stand against anti-Semitism, as we see growing polarization, groups segregating themselves and aligning against Jews in particular. I understand that the resolution has no legal power. At the same time, we would be making a statement not just to Americans but to the world that we will not stand for anti-Semitism. Other groups have already spoken out for their constituency. Who will speak out for Jews?

I still hope that when the resolution is finalized and announced, politics are put aside. That extremists are discredited. And that wisdom, justice and compassion reign. That we condemn only anti-Semitism for this resolution.

Please don’t disappoint me.

P.S. Don’t bother to mention Ms. Omar; just censure her and remove her from committees. I don’t want her scapegoated in this resolution and thus make her a martyr.

 

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  1. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Great post, @susanquinn! I agree with everything you said.

    • #1
  2. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Jim McConnell (View Comment):

    Great post, @susanquinn! I agree with everything you said.

    Thanks, @jimmcconnell. I try not to complain, but I felt so disheartened and frustrated by the comments I was hearing.

    • #2
  3. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Very well said.

    • #3
  4. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Very well said.

    Thanks, @rodin. I was trying to separate my visceral anger from good reasoning. It wasn’t easy to do.

    • #4
  5. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    I agree too – basically the liberals don’t give a flip about racism or antisemitism unless it serves a political purpose.  Their lukewarm efforts are unacceptable, as a Judaeo-Christian country and the basis for western civilization as we still know it, in spite of the bull propaganda to try to erase that. And Omar needs to go with a swift kick to the rear.

    • #5
  6. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Paging Senator Tim Scott (SC-Republican). The Congressional Black Caucus is on the Jew-hater’s side. We saw you square up on the Republican Party for white supremacy, on the occasion of a single Rep. Steve King (IA-Republican) interview. Given the history of Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, Louis Farakan… silence or less high profile and unambiguous denounciation is complicity.

    No Sister Soulja moment here? 

     

    • #6
  7. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    I agree too – basically the liberals don’t give a flip about racism or antisemitism unless it serves a political purpose. Their lukewarm efforts are unacceptable, as a Judaeo-Christian country and the basis for western civilization as we still know it, in spite of the bull propaganda to try to erase that. And Omar needs to go with a swift kick to the rear.

    I feel that they are trying to say, well, our problems are as important, or more important than yours. I want to tell them, this isn’t a contest, folks.

    • #7
  8. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    Paging Senator Tim Scott (SC-Republican). The Congressional Black Caucus is on the Jew-hater’s side. We saw you square up on the Republican Party for white supremacy, on the occasion of a single Rep. Steve King (IA-Republican) interview. Given the history of Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, Louis Farakan… silence or less high profile and unambiguous denounciation is complicity.

    No Sister Soulja moment here?

     

    So true, @cliffordbrown. All those men were anti-Semites to one degree or another; Farrakhan has no problem letting everyone know that he is. Their watering down the resolution just shows that they are determined to support their own constituencies above all others. Too sad. Thanks.

    • #8
  9. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    See also this assessment from PowerLine: [emphasis added]

    I thought the House Democrats’ original resolution condemning anti-Semitism, without naming Ilhan Omar, was anodyne. I thought she probably could vote for it. But that resolution, which referred only to anti-Semitism, was withdrawn by leadership, reportedly because of an outpouring of support for Omar within the party. That support didn’t come from people who doubted that she is an anti-Semite–she has made that blindingly clear, repeatedly!–but rather from people who share her particular bigotry.

    So the Democrats are in a tight spot. Leadership has had to back off, and is in the process of substituting a resolution that toes the party line by nattering on about Islamophobia and so on. A resolution that refers to everything, and therefore nothing. A resolution that tries to preserve the fig leaf of a party that is opposed to hate. Even as its members express the vilest, most hateful, most bigoted views that America has seen in its modern history.

    • #9
  10. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    See also this assessment from PowerLine: [emphasis added]

    I thought the House Democrats’ original resolution condemning anti-Semitism, without naming Ilhan Omar, was anodyne. I thought she probably could vote for it. But that resolution, which referred only to anti-Semitism, was withdrawn by leadership, reportedly because of an outpouring of support for Omar within the party. That support didn’t come from people who doubted that she is an anti-Semite–she has made that blindingly clear, repeatedly!–but rather from people who share her particular bigotry.

    So the Democrats are in a tight spot. Leadership has had to back off, and is in the process of substituting a resolution that toes the party line by nattering on about Islamophobia and so on. A resolution that refers to everything, and therefore nothing. A resolution that tries to preserve the fig leaf of a party that is opposed to hate. Even as its members express the vilest, most hateful, most bigoted views that America has seen in its modern history.

    Very well said. Fleshes out my points. I  wonder what lies ahead?

    • #10
  11. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    There is probably a higher percentage of Jews in Congress than in the wider society.  And you don’t hear them speaking out, do you?  Sherrod Brown?  Chuck Schumer?  Silent, silent.  They are Progressives first, everything else later, even Jewish.  This is disgusting.

    • #11
  12. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    See also this assessment from PowerLine: [emphasis added]

    I thought the House Democrats’ original resolution condemning anti-Semitism, without naming Ilhan Omar, was anodyne. I thought she probably could vote for it. But that resolution, which referred only to anti-Semitism, was withdrawn by leadership, reportedly because of an outpouring of support for Omar within the party. That support didn’t come from people who doubted that she is an anti-Semite–she has made that blindingly clear, repeatedly!–but rather from people who share her particular bigotry.

    So the Democrats are in a tight spot. Leadership has had to back off, and is in the process of substituting a resolution that toes the party line by nattering on about Islamophobia and so on. A resolution that refers to everything, and therefore nothing. A resolution that tries to preserve the fig leaf of a party that is opposed to hate. Even as its members express the vilest, most hateful, most bigoted views that America has seen in its modern history.

    Very well said. Fleshes out my points. I wonder what lies ahead?

    I’m sure they would love to back-channel Omar out right now, sort of along the same lines that AOC’s career path could be affected by the campaign finance violations reported to the FEC. That way, you get a third party to do the dirty work, and Democrats can act as though they had nothing to do with it, even if one or more of them were the ones who tipped off the FEC.

    Omar has the immigration allegation out there that she married her own brother in order to get him into the country. A leak with more details on that to immigration officials could spark a new probe, but considering the negative publicity Omar’s generating for the party as a whole, it’s hard to see the Trump Justice Department or DHS fast-tracking a probe here, especially since even if Pelosi was happy to see it, she’d publicly demonize Trump for it.

    • #12
  13. Fake John/Jane Galt Coolidge
    Fake John/Jane Galt
    @FakeJohnJaneGalt

    Can we give this stuff a break?  The women are Democrat, Muslim and obvious have some racism in their make up.  So what?  It’s a free country and they have a right to be racist idiots.  I would prefer they keep it in the open so we can see what they are than hide it and let it fester.  I don’t like this PC crap when the Left does it or the Right.

    • #13
  14. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Susan, may I re-blog over at RushBabe49.com?  With attribution to “a Ricochet Friend”.

    • #14
  15. tigerlily Member
    tigerlily
    @tigerlily

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    See also this assessment from PowerLine: [emphasis added]

    I thought the House Democrats’ original resolution condemning anti-Semitism, without naming Ilhan Omar, was anodyne. I thought she probably could vote for it. But that resolution, which referred only to anti-Semitism, was withdrawn by leadership, reportedly because of an outpouring of support for Omar within the party. That support didn’t come from people who doubted that she is an anti-Semite–she has made that blindingly clear, repeatedly!–but rather from people who share her particular bigotry.

    So the Democrats are in a tight spot. Leadership has had to back off, and is in the process of substituting a resolution that toes the party line by nattering on about Islamophobia and so on. A resolution that refers to everything, and therefore nothing. A resolution that tries to preserve the fig leaf of a party that is opposed to hate. Even as its members express the vilest, most hateful, most bigoted views that America has seen in its modern history.

    Very well said. Fleshes out my points. I wonder what lies ahead?

    I don’t think the Dems as currently constituted (with the emphasis on intersectionality and identity politics) are capable of a simple resolution condemning anti-Semitism.

    • #15
  16. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Susan, may I re-blog over at RushBabe49.com? With attribution to “a Ricochet Friend”.

    Sure. Any time. Thanks. 

    • #16
  17. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    I suggest those House members who are Jewish start wearing gold stars to House sessions.  When asked why by the MSM, they could respond, “We’re wearing them to make Representatives Omar and Tlaib feel more at home.”

    • #17
  18. Kay of MT Member
    Kay of MT
    @KayofMT

    I think every single Jew in this country of voting age should vote republican this coming elections. It might give the Dems something to think about. A couple of muslim nut cases in congress should not be making policy. And everybody by this point should know that the Koran teaches violence against Jews and their vow to kill them all.

    • #18
  19. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    Israel is about the size of New Jersey. If it were a State in the United States, it would be a “purple” State, perhaps more blue than red. The “red” mix in the purple State of Israel is caused by a larger than normal proportion of orthodox Jews and the fact that the entire population is surrounded by heavily armed and fanatical enemies who wish to eliminate her and extinguish the entire population. The threat of extinction tends to keep a people tuned into reality. In other words, in a political sphere, Israel is closer to the left than the right. 

    Why do I bring these comparisons? Proof of antisemitism on the left. The Muslims who receive support from the left have, on a social level, nothing in common with the left. The Jews have nearly everything in common. And yet it is the Jews of Israel who receive the left’s enmity, not the Muslims of Gaza, Lebanon, and Syria. What is the “inexplicable” connection between the Muslims and the left? Antisemitism. 

    Now I realize the reason or reasons could take many books to explore. But I’m just a simple guy. This is my simple explanation.

    • #19
  20. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… Thatcher
    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…
    @GumbyMark

    tigerlily (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    See also this assessment from PowerLine: [emphasis added]

    I thought the House Democrats’ original resolution condemning anti-Semitism, without naming Ilhan Omar, was anodyne. I thought she probably could vote for it. But that resolution, which referred only to anti-Semitism, was withdrawn by leadership, reportedly because of an outpouring of support for Omar within the party. That support didn’t come from people who doubted that she is an anti-Semite–she has made that blindingly clear, repeatedly!–but rather from people who share her particular bigotry.

    So the Democrats are in a tight spot. Leadership has had to back off, and is in the process of substituting a resolution that toes the party line by nattering on about Islamophobia and so on. A resolution that refers to everything, and therefore nothing. A resolution that tries to preserve the fig leaf of a party that is opposed to hate. Even as its members express the vilest, most hateful, most bigoted views that America has seen in its modern history.

    Very well said. Fleshes out my points. I wonder what lies ahead?

    I don’t think the Dems as currently constituted (with the emphasis on intersectionality and identity politics) are capable of a simple resolution condemning anti-Semitism.

    Well, after all, there are good people on both sides of this.

    • #20
  21. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    cdor (View Comment):

    Israel is about the size of New Jersey. If it were a State in the United States, it would be a “purple” State, perhaps more blue than red. The “red” mix in the purple State of Israel is caused by a larger than normal proportion of orthodox Jews and the fact that the entire population is surrounded by heavily armed and fanatical enemies who wish to eliminate her and extinguish the entire population. The threat of extinction tends to keep a people tuned into reality. In other words, in a political sphere, Israel is closer to the left than the right.

    Why do I bring these comparisons? Proof of antisemitism on the left. The Muslims who receive support from the left have, on a social level, nothing in common with the left. The Jews have nearly everything in common. And yet it is the Jews of Israel who receive the left’s enmity, not the Muslims of Gaza, Lebanon, and Syria. What is the “inexplicable” connection between the Muslims and the left? Antisemitism.

    Now I realize the reason or reasons could take many books to explore. But I’m just a simple guy. This is my simple explanation.

    Thanks, @cdor. I just wonder when the actual Jews, Orthodox or not, are going to realize that they are “consorting with the enemy” when they support the Left. I know some of them don’t support Israel, but I wonder if they are beginning to realize that the Left is abandoning them.

    • #21
  22. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… (View Comment):
    Well, after all, there are good people on both sides of this.

    On both sides of what? Anti-Semitism. Or do you jest?

    • #22
  23. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… Thatcher
    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…
    @GumbyMark

    I think if you are trying to do something other than persuade those who already agree with you, your attempt to win the intersectionality sweepstakes for Jews over blacks will backfire since this is an issue for an American Congress.  We were slaves in Egypt, but the ancestors of many blacks were slaves here, and then for nearly a century afterwards they were treated like crap and rejected in their efforts to assimilate into American society which is very different from the Jewish story in America. 

    • #23
  24. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… Thatcher
    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…
    @GumbyMark

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… (View Comment):
    Well, after all, there are good people on both sides of this.

    On both sides of what? Anti-Semitism. Or do you jest?

    Forgot to put my sarcasm alert on!  Just a reference to the President’s remarks.

    • #24
  25. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… (View Comment):

    I think if you are trying to do something other than persuade those who already agree with you, your attempt to win the intersectionality sweepstakes for Jews over blacks will backfire since this is an issue for an American Congress. We were slaves in Egypt, but the ancestors of many blacks were slaves here, and then for nearly a century afterwards they were treated like crap and rejected in their efforts to assimilate into American society which is very different from the Jewish story in America.

    I have another post that is related to this one, Mark, and I’m getting them a bit mixed up in my mind. I don’t want to make this a competition between who’s the most put upon. Truly. I only object to lumping them all together in this resolution to help blacks feel they are being treated fairly. I also think the potential changes are being suggested to minimize anti-Semitism, and I’m tired of those efforts. I’d like the resolution on anti-Semitism to be distinct. If others want to create a resolution for other groups, that’s fine. And I’m not arguing about who were slaves and when. I’m talking about anti-Semitism. Period.

    • #25
  26. Old Bathos Moderator
    Old Bathos
    @OldBathos

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    There is probably a higher percentage of Jews in Congress than in the wider society. And you don’t hear them speaking out, do you? Sherrod Brown? Chuck Schumer? Silent, silent. They are Progressives first, everything else later, even Jewish. This is disgusting.

    Catholic Democrats sold out on all social issues a long time ago.  Why should Jewish Democrats be expected to adhere to principle where their vital community interests are at stake?  To be a Democrat means (a) total commitment to achieving more political power for the party and (b) the current narrative über alles.

    • #26
  27. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… Thatcher
    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…
    @GumbyMark

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… (View Comment):

    I think if you are trying to do something other than persuade those who already agree with you, your attempt to win the intersectionality sweepstakes for Jews over blacks will backfire since this is an issue for an American Congress. We were slaves in Egypt, but the ancestors of many blacks were slaves here, and then for nearly a century afterwards they were treated like crap and rejected in their efforts to assimilate into American society which is very different from the Jewish story in America.

    I have another post that is related to this one, Mark, and I’m getting them a bit mixed up in my mind. I don’t want to make this a competition between who’s the most put upon. Truly. I only object to lumping them all together in this resolution to help blacks feel they are being treated fairly. I also think the potential changes are being suggested to minimize anti-Semitism, and I’m tired of those efforts. I’d like the resolution on anti-Semitism to be distinct. If others want to create a resolution for other groups, that’s fine. And I’m not arguing about who were slaves and when. I’m talking about anti-Semitism. Period.

    I agree with your desired endpoint but disagree with that aspect of your argument which weakens your case.

    • #27
  28. Jon1979 Lincoln
    Jon1979
    @Jon1979

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    cdor (View Comment):

    Israel is about the size of New Jersey. If it were a State in the United States, it would be a “purple” State, perhaps more blue than red. The “red” mix in the purple State of Israel is caused by a larger than normal proportion of orthodox Jews and the fact that the entire population is surrounded by heavily armed and fanatical enemies who wish to eliminate her and extinguish the entire population. The threat of extinction tends to keep a people tuned into reality. In other words, in a political sphere, Israel is closer to the left than the right.

    Why do I bring these comparisons? Proof of antisemitism on the left. The Muslims who receive support from the left have, on a social level, nothing in common with the left. The Jews have nearly everything in common. And yet it is the Jews of Israel who receive the left’s enmity, not the Muslims of Gaza, Lebanon, and Syria. What is the “inexplicable” connection between the Muslims and the left? Antisemitism.

    Now I realize the reason or reasons could take many books to explore. But I’m just a simple guy. This is my simple explanation.

    Thanks, @cdor. I just wonder when the actual Jews, Orthodox or not, are going to realize that they are “consorting with the enemy” when they support the Left. I know some of them don’t support Israel, but I wonder if they are beginning to realize that the Left is abandoning them.

    I doubt you’re going to see any change until there’s some real loss of power — i.e., if it gets to the point that Congressional Democrats aren’t just watering down condemnations of anti-Semitism to nothing out of fear of losing part of their coalition, but to where someone like Chuck Schumer is being voted out by his party caucus as Senate Minority Leader because he dared speak at AIPAC. We’re still a ways out from that, but we are headed in that direction.

    • #28
  29. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… (View Comment):
    I agree with your desired endpoint but disagree with that aspect of your argument which weakens your case.

    So to be clear, you think that however the resolution is written, it would be fine with you. Is that correct?

    • #29
  30. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… Thatcher
    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…
    @GumbyMark

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… (View Comment):
    I agree with your desired endpoint but disagree with that aspect of your argument which weakens your case.

    So to be clear, you think that however the resolution is written, it would be fine with you. Is that correct?

    No, I would not be.  My point is making the argument the way you have is self-defeating.

    • #30

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