Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Creepy Line (2018 Documentary)

 

In 1987, Milton Friedman published an article in the WSJ about how polls on Bork were being deliberately biased against him. The ideological gatekeepers have advanced far beyond this with search engines.

This scary documentary is available on Amazon Prime. It details the massive power of Google (Alphabet) and Facebook and their ability to shift elections to the Left. Particularly chilling is how Google can do it on search results in an indiscernible manner. I wondered why Google was able to act so blatantly using corporate resources on behalf of Obama in 2008; the documentary explains that its two top execs have controlling shares of the voting stock and thus, short of fraud, are pretty able to do whatever they want. Both of these companies are creatures of the Left and are using their powers to advance its agenda.

National Review has a detailed review. and details from the documentarians are here.

There are 18 comments.

  1. MarciN Member

    The Wall Street Journal yesterday ran a story that is as shocking as The Creepy Line: “You Give Apps Sensitive Personal Information. Then They Tell Facebook.”

    I hope someone smart is reading and watching. The American people have got to get ahead of this issue of long-term data storage of personal information. I’m afraid though it is a box that we’ll never get shut again, now that we’ve opened it.

    • #1
    • February 23, 2019, at 9:06 AM PST
    • 6 likes
  2. EODmom Coolidge

    @marcin – I believe (based largely on my observation of our 30-35 yr old family members and their friends and our long tenure working in tech as said companies were starting) that anyone younger than 35 is completely (or at least largely) unconcerned about what they have every reason to be well aware of. They so much take for granted the ubiquitousness of electronic communication and information access – and unselfconsciously contribute to data accumulation- that they take it for granted that there is no privacy. The only ones in that age group who are circumspect about their online behaviour are those (like our son and his family) who are concerned about their safety. They may have become bored with Facebook, or think instagram is passé, but they love Pinterest for searching for all kinds of stuff (like ideas for birthday parties,) and laugh that Roku changes their program listings whenever they have a kids sleepover and the kids watch tv all night, but they won’t take affirmative steps to limit what they offer to the data gods. My conclusion is anecdotal of course, but that’s my story and I’m sticking to it. Meantime, we don’t Face or Cloud or any of that stuff. And I can’t find anything when I sporadically search my name or maiden name online. The whole mess is beyond creepy as far as I’m concerned. Google was waaayyyy creepy in its pre-public days and hasn’t changed. It (and Facebook) accepts no boundaries on its corporate behaviour or external authority on its objectives. Not to be trusted. 

    • #2
    • February 23, 2019, at 10:02 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  3. MarciN Member

    EODmom (View Comment):

    @marcin – I believe (based largely on my observation of our 30-35 yr old family members and their friends and our long tenure working in tech as said companies were starting) that anyone younger than 35 is completely (or at least largely) unconcerned about what they have every reason to be well aware of. They so much take for granted the ubiquitousness of electronic communication and information access – and unselfconsciously contribute to data accumulation- that they take it for granted that there is no privacy. The only ones in that age group who are circumspect about their online behaviour are those (like our son and his family) who are concerned about their safety. They may have become bored with Facebook, or think instagram is passé, but they love Pinterest for searching for all kinds of stuff (like ideas for birthday parties,) and laugh that Roku changes their program listings whenever they have a kids sleepover and the kids watch tv all night, but they won’t take affirmative steps to limit what they offer to the data gods. My conclusion is anecdotal of course, but that’s my story and I’m sticking to it. Meantime, we don’t Face or Cloud or any of that stuff. And I can’t find anything when I sporadically search my name or maiden name online. The whole mess is beyond creepy as far as I’m concerned. Google was waaayyyy creepy in its pre-public days and hasn’t changed. It (and Facebook) accepts no boundaries on its corporate behaviour or external authority on its objectives. Not to be trusted.

    My kids are all wary of the data-sharing environment, but nowhere near as much as I think they should be.

    The only answer I can come up with is to make sure personal data is stored with self-destruct encryption. And we need to order the cloud-owning companies like Amazon Web Services to purge data from their warehouses periodically.

    Otherwise we can kiss second chances and clean slates away, even for young people. When they end up poor and asking for financial help, I’m afraid we taxpayers will have to share some of the responsibility for how these people ended up.

    In my heart, I know someone out there in the United States is inventing a way for us to share only the data we want to share and only with those we want to have it or keep it. I will not panic and choose to hope instead. :-)

    In the meantime, I’m going to ditch my smartphone and go back to a flip phone without a location tracker.

    • #3
    • February 23, 2019, at 10:11 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  4. Barfly Member

    MarciN (View Comment):
    In my heart, I know someone out there in the United States is inventing a way for us to share only the data we want to share and only with those we want to have it or keep it. I will not panic and choose to hope instead. :-)

    I’ve played with it. It’s technically tricky; recent blockchain implementation failures demonstrate that. It would require infrastructure in the network, probably down to the protocols, that will be actively and passively resisted. The size of the deployed system is effectively infinite; that means our solution has to be self deploying and somewhat optional. Don’t panic, it’s right to hope, but it’s a hard problem. It has to be done bottom up, almost by definition.

    P.S. I’m an experimenter and dilettante. The solution won’t come from me.

    • #4
    • February 23, 2019, at 11:59 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  5. Annefy Member

    MarciN (View Comment):

    EODmom (View Comment):

    @marcin – I believe (based largely on my observation of our 30-35 yr old family members and their friends and our long tenure working in tech as said companies were starting) that anyone younger than 35 is completely (or at least largely). snip 

    My kids are all wary of the data-sharing environment, but nowhere near as much as I think they should be.

    The only answer I can come up with is to make sure personal data is stored with self-destruct encryption. And we need to order the cloud-owning companies like Amazon Web Services to purge data from their warehouses periodically.

    Otherwise we can kiss second chances and clean slates away, even for young people. When they end up poor and asking for financial help, I’m afraid we taxpayers will have to share some of the responsibility for how these people ended up.

    In my heart, I know someone out there in the United States is inventing a way for us to share only the data we want to share and only with those we want to have it or keep it. I will not panic and choose to hope instead. :-)

    In the meantime, I’m going to ditch my smartphone and go back to a flip phone without a location tracker.

    Last weekend I attended a cell Phone forensics presentation. I don’t have my notes, but from memory :

    1. ANDROIDs are much worse than iPhones because Google. The presenter went so far as to say “Google is evil” because of their loose sharing habits and how long they store info. He suggested everyone in the room ditch their Android and switch to iPhone 

    2. Only turn off your location tracker if you’re planning on committing a crime. Tracker can prove you weren’t where someone is claiming you were 

    3. Presenter declared that someone in the room or someone they knew would be convicted of vehicular man slaughter because of their phone. Not only can LE tell if you were using your phone, also known will be the angle of the phone, ie whether you are holding it

    4 (not part of the presentation but from this week’s news) Nest thermostats include a microphone. Google simply forgot to mention it . And not to worry, they’ve never turned them on.

    5 Don’t have your Gmail account on your phone. Because Google

    6 if you must participate on FB, do not have the app on your phone, use a laptop 

    7 if LE asks for your phone, the only thing you should say is “come back with a warrant”. But what used to take a warrant to the phone provider is now readily shared by google etc

    I will check my notes tomorrow and weigh in with anything I missed 

    It’s Big Brother except we bought the microphones and cameras and carry them with us

     

    • #5
    • February 23, 2019, at 9:06 PM PST
    • 8 likes
  6. EODmom Coolidge

    @annefy Maybe all you missed was “Don’t say anything to LE without a lawyer present. Nothing. And NO chatting with the nice officers.” I routinely urge our gang to ditch gmail. We don’t goog anything. They really are not to be trusted. EODDad declined goog head tax job when it was still pre-public because it was just too weird for him. It was very weird. Gosh that was a long time ago – many people remembered the hype about Netscape and doubted it would amount to much. He said they were creepy focused and whole corporate vibe outta whack. Just got more so, as you know. He never regretted missing out the IPO. 

    • #6
    • February 24, 2019, at 5:43 AM PST
    • 6 likes
  7. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher

    Richard Easton: This scary documentary is available on Amazon Prime. It details the massive power of Google (Alphabet) and Facebook and their ability to shift elections to the Left. Particularly chilling is how Google can do it on search results in an indiscernible manner.

    I watched it on Amazon Prime last night and was amazed by the reality of Google’s power. The only solution is for someone to invent a better Google; another might be for the government to go after them on anti-trust grounds. 

    • #7
    • February 24, 2019, at 10:07 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  8. Barfly Member

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):
    I watched it on Amazon Prime last night and was amazed by the reality of Google’s power.

    Heh. Imagine what we’d see if we could watch The Creepy Retailer on Google Prime.

    • #8
    • February 24, 2019, at 11:54 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  9. DrewInWisconsin, Type Monkey Member

    I keep reading more and more reports from people who talk about a subject within earshot of their cell phones, only to suddenly see ads for products related to that subject pop up in their browsing. Anyone here have that experience. 

    I’ve had similar things happen, but never connected it to cell phones listening to me, because I don’t have a cell phone. I have chalked it up to coincidence, but it’s getting to be too common.

    • #9
    • February 24, 2019, at 3:19 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  10. Basil Fawlty Member

    Looks like you can watch The Creepy Line on google’s YouTube, so there’s that.

    • #10
    • February 24, 2019, at 3:20 PM PST
    • 1 like
  11. Richard Easton Member
    Richard Easton Post author

    Basil Fawlty (View Comment):

    Looks like you can watch The Creepy Line on google’s YouTube, so there’s that.

    They’ll do almost anything for money.

    • #11
    • February 24, 2019, at 3:22 PM PST
    • Like
  12. Basil Fawlty Member

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    Basil Fawlty (View Comment):

    Looks like you can watch The Creepy Line on google’s YouTube, so there’s that.

    They’ll do almost anything for money.

    Me, too.

    • #12
    • February 24, 2019, at 3:26 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  13. Aaron Miller Member

    Perhaps the documentary can change my mind. But I don’t care what algorithms do with information about me. 

    When YouTube suggests a video because of something I wrote on Ricochet, so what? Nobody at Google knows a thing about me. The software they designed does, and it just uses it for marketing products or services. That doesn’t threaten my freedom or security… especially since the software is terrible at its job. 

    If an employee or CEO compiled a file based on someone’s online activities and tried to use that against the user, that company would be sued and hammered by bad PR.

    Granted, Democrat voters are generally okay with unethical libel and destruction of their opponents. And lefty companies often act against their financial interests by needlessly annoying conservative customers. But I don’t recall an example of Google wrecking someone’s life. 

    If it happens to anyone, it will happen to a politician or other celebrity. Who better to sue the company than someone rich and famous?

    • #13
    • February 24, 2019, at 3:36 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  14. Steve C. Member

    Basil Fawlty (View Comment):

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    Basil Fawlty (View Comment):

    Looks like you can watch The Creepy Line on google’s YouTube, so there’s that.

    They’ll do almost anything for money.

    Me, too.

    Those are my principles. If you don’t like them…I have others.

    • #14
    • February 24, 2019, at 3:38 PM PST
    • Like
  15. DrewInWisconsin, Type Monkey Member

    Aaron Miller (View Comment):
    But I don’t recall an example of Google wrecking someone’s life. 

    James Damore?

     

     

    • #15
    • February 24, 2019, at 4:33 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  16. Eugene Kriegsmann Member

    Thank you for the recommendation. I am going to watch it right now!

    • #16
    • February 24, 2019, at 4:35 PM PST
    • 1 like
  17. Eugene Kriegsmann Member

    I just watched. It is really creepy and a must watch. I have never had a Facebook account or used Tweeter, but I do use Google, not so much as a search engine, but for my calendar and email. I don’t have a lot of options in regard to those two items. However, I pity and poor fool who is assigned to read my emails for subversive matters or even for my buying habits. It is likely to bore him to death.

    • #17
    • February 24, 2019, at 6:09 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  18. Songwriter Member

    DrewInWisconsin (View Comment):

    I keep reading more and more reports from people who talk about a subject within earshot of their cell phones, only to suddenly see ads for products related to that subject pop up in their browsing. Anyone here have that experience.

    I’ve had similar things happen, but never connected it to cell phones listening to me, because I don’t have a cell phone. I have chalked it up to coincidence, but it’s getting to be too common.

    Happens to us all the time.

    • #18
    • February 25, 2019, at 5:25 AM PST
    • Like