Old-fashioned Privacy

 

View original artwork here.

Published in General
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There are 6 comments.

  1. George Townsend Member

    Really funny!

    • #1
    • January 10, 2019, at 8:28 AM PDT
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  2. Front Seat Cat Member

    I LOVE the drawings – of course back in the day, I am sure those devices were improvised to spy on the enemy – 

    • #2
    • January 10, 2019, at 8:40 AM PDT
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  3. GFHandle Member

    In Orwell’s 1984 it is a crime to turn off the propagandising (fake news) screens. And in that world, too, the walls have ears. We, instead, need not be forced to watch them–nor to broadcast ourselves.

    • #3
    • January 10, 2019, at 8:55 AM PDT
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  4. The Reticulator Member

     Not true. In the Russian movies a little device inserted into the mouthpiece would spy on you. 

    • #4
    • January 10, 2019, at 11:13 AM PDT
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  5. Ray Kujawa Coolidge

    So true. I call me new TV a nosy TV (it’s a Smart TV) because in order to view any of my own paysites without hooking up my personal computer to it, I had to restore a Google account I used years ago. But since I figured out how to get my laptop to connect with the TV, I haven’t had to sign into Google. I can watch my sports and Hulu pay channels without logging in to Google. The entire purpose of creating that front end by Google is to watch your viewing habits and supposedly make ‘suggestions’ for what you really want to watch next. It adds no value to me. As The Prisoner often said, “I am not a number. I am a free man!” It’s here right now. We’re living in The Village.

    • #5
    • January 10, 2019, at 1:26 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  6. The Reticulator Member

    GFHandle (View Comment):

    In Orwell’s 1984 it is a crime to turn off the propagandising (fake news) screens. And in that world, too, the walls have ears. We, instead, need not be forced to watch them–nor to broadcast ourselves.

    Some years ago I read that in North Korea it’s mandatory to keep the radio on. Don’t know if that has changed.

    I have made a nuisance of myself by objecting to the televisions in the waiting rooms at the hospitals or in the jury room at the local courthouse. At the courthouse it did some good, according to my wife after her last term of jury service. At the hospital, not so much, but they finally did tone them down a little and leave a place here and there where one could escape.

    • #6
    • January 10, 2019, at 1:56 PM PDT
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