Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. 93% of Republican Women Support Trump

 

According to Daniel Henninger, the deputy editor of the opinion page of the Wall Street Journal, 93 percent of Republican women support Trump. His information came from a recent Fox News Poll that also reported the women were even more supportive than their male counterparts who support Trump to the tune of 85 percent. The poll is extensive, so make sure you scroll down for the section where party identification begins.

Lest you believe these women are off in blind la la land, Henninger says, “Which brings us to what may be the greatest Republican political blunder of this generation — failing to fix ObamaCare. The percentage of GOP women who express concern about health care is 77%.”

The article is definitely worth reading as many of us can identify with some of the concerns of these Republican women. We solidly back Trump but are aware of the work that still needs to be done and the necessity for our own politicos to get on board.

There are 100 comments.

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  1. Richard Easton Member

    The Republican Congress failed to repeal ObamaCare and did little to enhance border security. Trump has cut back on ObamaCare but judges have unconstitutionally restricted his executive powers to protect the people from illegal immigration.

    • #1
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:02 PM PST
    • 8 likes
  2. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    The Republican Congress failed to repeal ObamaCare and did little to enhance border security. Trump has cut back on ObamaCare but judges have unconstitutionally restricted his executive powers to protect the people from illegal immigration.

    Yep. The Ruling class is of one mind. 

    There is no way 93% of people here support Trump. 

    • #2
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:08 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  3. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    The Republican Congress failed to repeal Obamacare and did little to enhance border security. Trump has cut back on Obamacare but judges have unconstitutionally restricted his executive powers to protect the people from illegal immigration.

    It was surprising to me that our side didn’t have a great substitution for Obamacare, particularly since we complained about it for the entire Obama presidency. As for building the wall, it only makes sense. Every home we’ve ever owned had a fence around the backyard to keep our dogs in and dangerous critters out. It only follows that a country would do the same thing. Thanks to Trump’s Supreme picks, we’ll see some of these immigration opinions from lower court judges overturned.

    • #3
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:09 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  4. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):
    There is no way 93% of people here support Trump. 

    Keep in mind the Fox poll referred to Republican women. Here on Ricochet, who knows? We haven’t had a poll in ages.

    • #4
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:11 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  5. Bob Thompson Member

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    The Republican Congress failed to repeal ObamaCare and did little to enhance border security. Trump has cut back on ObamaCare but judges have unconstitutionally restricted his executive powers to protect the people from illegal immigration.

    Don’t the Republicans in Congress need to stand up for their deceptive posturing at some point? Oh, maybe there will be a price to pay.

    • #5
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:24 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  6. Mendel Member

    Goldwaterwoman: His information came from a recent Fox News Poll that also reported the women were even more supportive than their male counterparts who support Trump to the tune of 85%.

    Maybe its hidden in the poll data or in Henninger’s piece, but I’d like to know how they identified “Republican men/women”, and how representative they are of actual people who typically/frequently vote Republican. The difference between women and men could be due more to how willing people are to self-identify as/register with a party than what they actually think of Trump.

    • #6
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:24 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  7. Mendel Member

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    The Republican Congress failed to repeal ObamaCare and did little to enhance border security. Trump has cut back on ObamaCare but judges have unconstitutionally restricted his executive powers to protect the people from illegal immigration.

    Don’t the Republicans in Congress need to stand up for their deceptive posturing at some point? Oh, maybe there will be a price to pay.

    The price to be paid was during the primary season of the most recent election. None of them got primaried out, which is the Republican base’s way of saying “we approve of the job you did”.

    • #7
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:26 PM PST
    • 1 like
  8. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):
    Don’t the Republicans in Congress need to stand up for their deceptive posturing at some point? Oh, maybe there will be a price to pay.

    Yep, and we just paid that price, but the media blamed the losses all on Trump rather than the obstructionists.

    • #8
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:27 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  9. Mendel Member

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):
    It was surprising to me that our side didn’t have a great substitution for Obamacare, particularly since we complained about it for the entire Obama presidency.

    It shouldn’t be surprising.

    Republican voters want a free market healthcare system but they also want the government to guarantee coverage for the most expensive healthcare consumers. Those two desires are nearly diametrically opposed. But pointing this fact out tends to get one trashed on the right, so it’s not particularly surprising that there wasn’t much energy invested in proposing realistic alternatives to Obamacare.

    • #9
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:31 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  10. Miffed White Male Member

    Mendel (View Comment):

    Goldwaterwoman: His information came from a recent Fox News Poll that also reported the women were even more supportive than their male counterparts who support Trump to the tune of 85%.

    Maybe its hidden in the poll data or in Henninger’s piece, but I’d like to know how they identified “Republican men/women”, and how representative they are of actual people who typically/frequently vote Republican. The difference between women and men could be due more to how willing people are to self-identify as/register with a party than what they actually think of Trump.

    “The percentage of the Fox sample self-identifying as Republican women is 17%. “

    • #10
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:32 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  11. Bob Thompson Member

    Mendel (View Comment):

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):
    It was surprising to me that our side didn’t have a great substitution for Obamacare, particularly since we complained about it for the entire Obama presidency.

    It shouldn’t be surprising.

    Republican voters want a free market healthcare system but they also want the government to guarantee coverage for the most expensive healthcare consumers. Those two desires are nearly diametrically opposed. But pointing this fact out tends to get one trashed on the right, so it’s not particularly surprising that there wasn’t much energy invested in proposing realistic alternatives to Obamacare.

    That’s why the solution to complex problems is not something we should expect from government. Keep it simple. That’s all they are capable of.

    • #11
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:34 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  12. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):
    “The percentage of the Fox sample self-identifying as Republican women is 17%. ”

    Correct. Overall, Fox polled 1006 registered voters of all parties in a nationwide sample. In my own much smaller sample of Republican women I personally know, his support is 100%. That’s not to say they don’t have complaints too, but they are behind his policies and fully understand what he’s trying to do. 

    • #12
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:41 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  13. Mendel Member

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Mendel (View Comment):

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):
    It was surprising to me that our side didn’t have a great substitution for Obamacare, particularly since we complained about it for the entire Obama presidency.

    It shouldn’t be surprising.

    Republican voters want a free market healthcare system but they also want the government to guarantee coverage for the most expensive healthcare consumers. Those two desires are nearly diametrically opposed. But pointing this fact out tends to get one trashed on the right, so it’s not particularly surprising that there wasn’t much energy invested in proposing realistic alternatives to Obamacare.

    That’s why the solution to complex problems is not something we should expect from government. Keep it simple. That’s all they are capable of.

    Indeed. But there is no simple solution to repealing Obamacare while maintaining protections for people with pre-existing conditions. Yet the voters – including a critical mass of Republican voters – aren’t willing to give up those protections. So it’s understandable that Republican lawmakers were paralyzed: voters demanded the impossible of them.

    • #13
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:47 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  14. Bob Thompson Member

    Mendel (View Comment):

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Mendel (View Comment):

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):
    It was surprising to me that our side didn’t have a great substitution for Obamacare, particularly since we complained about it for the entire Obama presidency.

    It shouldn’t be surprising.

    Republican voters want a free market healthcare system but they also want the government to guarantee coverage for the most expensive healthcare consumers. Those two desires are nearly diametrically opposed. But pointing this fact out tends to get one trashed on the right, so it’s not particularly surprising that there wasn’t much energy invested in proposing realistic alternatives to Obamacare.

    That’s why the solution to complex problems is not something we should expect from government. Keep it simple. That’s all they are capable of.

    Indeed. But there is no simple solution to repealing Obamacare while maintaining protections for people with pre-existing conditions. Yet the voters – including a critical mass of Republican voters – aren’t willing to give up those protections. So it’s understandable that Republican lawmakers were paralyzed: voters demanded the impossible of them.

    Pretty foolish venture for Republican politicians, huh?

    • #14
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:50 PM PST
    • 1 like
  15. Hoyacon Member

    But I read (somewhere) that Trump is positively killing the brand with respect to young suburban women (who would vote Democratic anyway) :)

    • #15
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:55 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  16. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):
    That’s why the solution to complex problems is not something we should expect from government. Keep it simple. That’s all they are capable of.

    The Constitution tried to keep it simple and left so many things not designated by the Constitution to the states. Could it be that a hyperactive Supreme Court obsessed with social justice has slowly grabbed power for itself and Congress over the years creating a behemoth government in DC grappling with policies best left to the states? 

    • #16
    • December 20, 2018, at 2:58 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  17. Bob Thompson Member

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):
    That’s why the solution to complex problems is not something we should expect from government. Keep it simple. That’s all they are capable of.

    The Constitution tried to keep it simple and left so many things not designated by the Constitution to the states. Could it be that a hyperactive Supreme Court obsessed with social justice has slowly grabbed power for itself and Congress over the years creating a behemoth government in DC grappling with policies best left to the states?

    Not just the Court, Congress too frequently pushed by the Executive Branch, but they never understand when they are in over their heads. All of them.

    • #17
    • December 20, 2018, at 3:01 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  18. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    But I read (somewhere) that Trump is positively killing the brand with respect to young suburban women (who would vote Democratic anyway) :)

    I only posted the results of Republican women, but you can scroll down to get results from Dems and Independents. Young single women appear to want the nanny state. Republican women, IMHO, have always been a stronger lot. But of course I’m prejudiced in that regard. ☺

    • #18
    • December 20, 2018, at 3:05 PM PST
    • 6 likes
  19. RightAngles Member

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):
    “The percentage of the Fox sample self-identifying as Republican women is 17%. ”

    Correct. Overall, Fox polled 1006 registered voters of all parties in a nationwide sample. In my own much smaller sample of Republican women I personally know, his support is 100%. That’s not to say they don’t have complaints too, but they are behind his policies and fully understand what he’s trying to do.

    Of course our husbands, sons, and boyfriends told us who we support and who to vote for.

    • #19
    • December 20, 2018, at 3:39 PM PST
    • 11 likes
  20. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    RightAngles (View Comment):
    Of course our husbands, sons, and boyfriends told us who we support and who to vote for.

    Ha. My husband would roll over in his grave if anyone ever said that about me. And you, Texas lady, are among the strongest of the strong. 

    • #20
    • December 20, 2018, at 3:50 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  21. rgbact Member

    More proof that party ID is very fluid and that Republicans that don’t like Trump just don’t call themselves Republican anymore.

    There was a solid GOP health bill that failed last year. In retrospect, they probably made it too complex, which horribly fractured the Right who all started infighting over their pet issue…which killed the whole thing. Overall, I’m amazed how healthcare/entitlements isn’t talked about by anyone anymore.

    • #21
    • December 20, 2018, at 4:21 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  22. Lash LaRoche Inactive

    God bless every one of those women, and President Trump as well.

    • #22
    • December 20, 2018, at 5:11 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  23. Fake John/Jane Galt Coolidge

    I know more women that support Trump than men. Though many will not say so outright for various reasons.

    • #23
    • December 20, 2018, at 5:47 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  24. drlorentz Member

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):
    There is no way 93% of people here support Trump. 

    Two observations:

    1. “Here” is not a representative sample of Republicans.
    2. As Goldwaterwoman noted above, it’s about women, not Republicans in general.

    Anecdotally, the women here generally seem to be supportive of the president. There are exceptions, there has been no survey, and we suffer from problem #1 but still. The most outspoken NeverTrumpers around here are guys.

    • #24
    • December 20, 2018, at 6:04 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  25. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Mike "Lash" LaRoche (View Comment):

    God bless every one of those women, and President Trump as well.

    Have I told you lately that I love you?

    • #25
    • December 20, 2018, at 6:08 PM PST
    • 1 like
  26. Could Be Anyone Member

    I guess I am missing the importance of this statistic. Who cares if 93% of a small section, that at best is 15% of the electorate, of voters have expressed “support” for the President?

    We had an election a month ago where the party the President belonged to, and he himself alleged the election was about him, was defeated in a number of races at both the national and state level—and overall women voted in greater proportion to support Democrats than men in that election. Holding onto rural older white women is not a formula for winning, they are a declining demographic.

    This is not considering the fact that party identification for the GOP has declined since 2016 and party identification is the best indicator for how someone votes. 

    Assuming the support is genuine why does it matter that Trump is holding onto a smaller base than before? The last I checked enthusiasm doesn’t change the fact that one vote is one vote and you win elections by getting votes, not by losing them.

    • #26
    • December 20, 2018, at 7:37 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  27. lowtech redneck Coolidge

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    But I read (somewhere) that Trump is positively killing the brand with respect to young suburban women (who would vote Democratic anyway) :)

    Yes: https://www.npr.org/2018/12/19/677346260/warning-to-democrats-most-americans-against-u-s-getting-more-politically-correct?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

    Suburban women (except for Republican women, apparently) support oppressive and deranged political correctness. There is a yuuuuge gender gap. Removing Trump wouldn’t fix this, the only possibilities are a.) becoming a culturally progressive party (the not-so-secret preference of Establishment and business first Republicans, but a non-starter for the overwhelming majority of Republicans) or waiting until there is a convergence between men and women in our favor. The younger generation is strongly in favor of PC culture, but hispanics are an unexpected growth opportunity, if we can get them to change their apparent prioritization (and we already know from previous polls and voting behavior that amnesty and open borders are not necessary in that effort). Breaking the censorship power of Big Tech and digital commerce companies like paypal or Visa/Mastercard is a must.

    Long, ‘interesting’ times ahead. No movement is possible until the center-right becomes as resigned to that fact as conservatives and ‘populists’ already are.

    • #27
    • December 20, 2018, at 7:41 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  28. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman Post author

    Could Be Anyone (View Comment):
    This is not considering the fact that party identification for the GOP has declined since 2016 and party identification is the best indicator for how someone votes. 

    I’m convinced GOP ID has declined since the unpopularity of the Iraq war when the Dems successfully made Conservative a dirty word as we had done to them with Liberals. Why do they now call themselves Progressives? When did that start? And now, years later, here we are arguing over what is the difference between a Republican and a Conservative. When did that start? 

    • #28
    • December 20, 2018, at 8:31 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  29. Gary Robbins Reagan

    The Fox poll is 47 pages long. What page is the 93% statistic from?

    What is the statistic among independents which in many states is larger than Republicans, and sometimes even Democrats?

    Hard to see Trump winning with the average rating of 44% approval, in a time of full employment. Page 1 of 47. If employment falls or inflation starts, you can knock 10% off from the 44% figure.

    • #29
    • December 20, 2018, at 8:34 PM PST
    • Like
  30. Could Be Anyone Member

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):
    I’m convinced GOP ID has declined since the unpopularity of the Iraq war when the Dems successfully made Conservative a dirty word as we had done to them with Liberals. Why do they now call themselves Progressives? When did that start? And now, years later, here we are arguing over what is the difference between a Republican and a Conservative. When did that start? 

    Indeed it did decline by a few points after the Iraq War/Great Recession. But then it jumped back up by 2010 and then fell by 3 points between 2016 and 2018. You still haven’t answered my question though. Why should I care that Donald Trump holds sway with a declining demographic who do not decide elections?

    • #30
    • December 20, 2018, at 8:36 PM PST
    • 2 likes
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