The Kavanaugh Report: Never Forget

 

Monday, November 5, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley released a 414-page report (a 28-page report with 386 pages of appendices) regarding the Judiciary Committee’s investigations of various 11th-hour allegations against now-Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his confirmation hearings. It is the most comprehensive single document regarding the various allegations and the actual investigations undertaken and facts found by the Committee for each issue.

In addition to the Blasey-Ford allegations, the report includes the steps taken and all the information the Committee obtained regarding the Deborah Ramirez/Yale allegations, the Swetnick/Avenatti allegations, the Jane Doe allegations, and one or two others. For each and every one of these allegations, the Committee found “…no verifiable evidence to support…” the allegation. The report notes that criminal referrals to the Department of Justice have been made by the Committee regarding Swetnick/Avenatti and Jane Doe, and that the Committee is continuing to investigate others, such as Blasey-Ford’s long-time friend and former FBI agent Monica McLean, for possible criminal violations.

This issue is not over for the Left and should not be over for conservatives and Republicans. Thankfully, it appears that Chairman Grassley is continuing to investigate the Kavanaugh accusers in the hope that this sort of smear job will not be repeated. In addition, I hope that there are investigative reporters currently looking into Blasey-Ford to find the truth of who she is and why she attempted her smear of Justice Kavanaugh.

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  1. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    TBA (View Comment):

    Terrorists are always surprised twice. The first time is when they do get their way.

    This is something I wish more on our side realized. I was quite the Leftist in college, and I can tell you that each time any of our demands was met, in fact each time anyone even took us seriously and didn’t tell us to shut up and get a life, we were shocked.

    • #31
  2. JosePluma Coolidge
    JosePluma
    @JosePluma

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Chris Campion (View Comment):
    This is one of the reasons why you need bigger boomsticks in the house. Shooting through the door requires some oomph.

    Not really. You just open the door, they’d fall in, and then they’re home invaders. No jury in Tennessee would convict. Not sure about VA.

    Yeah, and then you’ve got an open door for the rest. A 12-gauge slug goes through a door very nicely. And no DA in Texas will prosecute. 

    If you come banging on my door, expect some banging in return. 

    • #32
  3. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    JosePluma (View Comment):

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Chris Campion (View Comment):
    This is one of the reasons why you need bigger boomsticks in the house. Shooting through the door requires some oomph.

    Not really. You just open the door, they’d fall in, and then they’re home invaders. No jury in Tennessee would convict. Not sure about VA.

    Yeah, and then you’ve got an open door for the rest. A 12-gauge slug goes through a door very nicely. And no DA in Texas will prosecute.

    If you come banging on my door, expect some banging in return.

    • #33
  4. Joshua Bissey Inactive
    Joshua Bissey
    @TheSockMonkey

    JosePluma (View Comment):

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Chris Campion (View Comment):
    This is one of the reasons why you need bigger boomsticks in the house. Shooting through the door requires some oomph.

    Not really. You just open the door, they’d fall in, and then they’re home invaders. No jury in Tennessee would convict. Not sure about VA.

    Yeah, and then you’ve got an open door for the rest. A 12-gauge slug goes through a door very nicely. And no DA in Texas will prosecute.

    If you come banging on my door, expect some banging in return.

    OK, Joe Biden, but some juries might.

    I hope you guys are joking about shooting through doors, or opening doors to let attackers inside.

    • #34
  5. Bucknelldad Coolidge
    Bucknelldad
    @SoupGuy

    As a former Senate official who considers myself an “institutionalist” and amateur historian, I have long revered and respected the institution for which I served. The Kavanaugh nomination process, for someone like me, was a seminal moment. Never before have completely uncorroborated charges been given such reverence, and make even fictional accounts of scandal as was dramatized in the great classic, “Advice and Consent” (movie and book) by Allen Drury look like a children’s bedtime story. The low point was seeing Ivy League trained attorneys (on the Democratic side) so quickly dismissing the fundamental tenet of our legal system – the presumption of innocence. They opted to #BelieveWomen, instead of #BelieveTruth. Justice is supposed to be blind to all matter of prejudices, especially politically-motived ones. 

    Agree with you, @tigerlily, and kudos to my friend Chairman Grassley for his committee’s referral to the Justice Department of these allegations for possible prosecution. The Senate must never again allow its confirmation process, especially for the highest court in the land, to be a political show trial. It should serve as our “remember the Alamo” for a long as possible, and let’s hope the Department of Justice decided to enforce the law. It was clearly broken here, as the Senate Judiciary Committee report strongly suggests. 

    • #35
  6. Fake John/Jane Galt Coolidge
    Fake John/Jane Galt
    @FakeJohnJaneGalt

    Bucknelldad (View Comment):

    As a former Senate official who considers myself an “institutionalist” and amateur historian, I have long revered and respected the institution for which I served. The Kavanaugh nomination process, for someone like me, was a seminal moment. Never before have completely uncorroborated charges been given such reverence, and make even fictional accounts of scandal as was dramatized in the great classic, “Advice and Consent” (movie and book) by Allen Drury look like a children’s bedtime story. The low point was seeing Ivy League trained attorneys (on the Democratic side) so quickly dismissing the fundamental tenet of our legal system – the presumption of innocence. They opted to #BelieveWomen, instead of #BelieveTruth. Justice is supposed to be blind to all matter of prejudices, especially politically-motived ones.

    Agree with you, @tigerlily, and kudos to my friend Chairman Grassley for his committee’s referral to the Justice Department of these allegations for possible prosecution. The Senate must never again allow its confirmation process, especially for the highest court in the land, to be a political show trial. It should serve as our “remember the Alamo” for a long as possible, and let’s hope the Department of Justice decided to enforce the law. It was clearly broken here, as the Senate Judiciary Committee report strongly suggests.

    The problem is they did believe the truth.  The truth is that Kavanaugh is a serial sexual abuser of womyn.  That is how it is portrayed to the public, what the public believes, the way history will record it, the way the popular culture will enshrine it.  The issue that there are no facts to support this truth is immaterial. 

    • #36
  7. tigerlily Member
    tigerlily
    @tigerlily

    Bucknelldad (View Comment):

    As a former Senate official who considers myself an “institutionalist” and amateur historian, I have long revered and respected the institution for which I served. The Kavanaugh nomination process, for someone like me, was a seminal moment. Never before have completely uncorroborated charges been given such reverence, and make even fictional accounts of scandal as was dramatized in the great classic, “Advice and Consent” (movie and book) by Allen Drury look like a children’s bedtime story. The low point was seeing Ivy League trained attorneys (on the Democratic side) so quickly dismissing the fundamental tenet of our legal system – the presumption of innocence. They opted to #BelieveWomen, instead of #BelieveTruth. Justice is supposed to be blind to all matter of prejudices, especially politically-motived ones.

    Agree with you, @tigerlily, and kudos to my friend Chairman Grassley for his committee’s referral to the Justice Department of these allegations for possible prosecution. The Senate must never again allow its confirmation process, especially for the highest court in the land, to be a political show trial. It should serve as our “remember the Alamo” for a long as possible, and let’s hope the Department of Justice decided to enforce the law. It was clearly broken here, as the Senate Judiciary Committee report strongly suggests.

    Well said Bucknelldad.

    • #37
  8. JosePluma Coolidge
    JosePluma
    @JosePluma

    Joshua Bissey (View Comment):

    JosePluma (View Comment):

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Chris Campion (View Comment):
    This is one of the reasons why you need bigger boomsticks in the house. Shooting through the door requires some oomph.

    Not really. You just open the door, they’d fall in, and then they’re home invaders. No jury in Tennessee would convict. Not sure about VA.

    Yeah, and then you’ve got an open door for the rest. A 12-gauge slug goes through a door very nicely. And no DA in Texas will prosecute.

    If you come banging on my door, expect some banging in return.

    OK, Joe Biden, but some juries might.

    I hope you guys are joking about shooting through doors, or opening doors to let attackers inside.

    I’m perfectly serious.  If you are in fear of your life from a thug or mob trying to break down your door, you have the right to defend yourself.   A jury won’t have any say because it will never go to trial. 

    • #38
  9. JosePluma Coolidge
    JosePluma
    @JosePluma

    Joshua Bissey (View Comment):

    JosePluma (View Comment):

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Chris Campion (View Comment):
    This is one of the reasons why you need bigger boomsticks in the house. Shooting through the door requires some oomph.

    Not really. You just open the door, they’d fall in, and then they’re home invaders. No jury in Tennessee would convict. Not sure about VA.

    Yeah, and then you’ve got an open door for the rest. A 12-gauge slug goes through a door very nicely. And no DA in Texas will prosecute.

    If you come banging on my door, expect some banging in return.

    OK, Joe Biden, but some juries might.

    I hope you guys are joking about shooting through doors, or opening doors to let attackers inside.

    If someone persists in trying to break down your door after a warning and racking a slug into your shotgun, that’s pretty much prima facie evidence that they mean to do you harm.

    I agree with you about not opening doors to thugs.

    • #39
  10. Joshua Bissey Inactive
    Joshua Bissey
    @TheSockMonkey

    JosePluma (View Comment):
    I’m perfectly serious. If you are in fear of your life from a thug or mob trying to break down your door, you have the right to defend yourself. A jury won’t have any say because it will never go to trial.

    Oh. I thought you were responding to the video. I didn’t see anyone trying to break down the door.

    • #40
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