Before This Week Ends, a Commemoration

 

Because I didn’t see a timely one, on either the Main or the Member Feeds. Apologies if I missed it.

Tuesday of this week (October 23, 2018) was the 35th anniversary of the bombing of the United States Marine Corps barracks in Beirut, Lebanon. 241 US service personnel were killed in the attack, including 220 Marines, and 21 others.

I worked for several years with (retired) Gunnery Sergeant Brian King, who was in the next rotation deployed to Beirut after the horror, who lost a lot of friends and brothers-in-arms in it, and for whom, although I met him about twenty years hence, I suspect it will never be completely “over.”

Thank you to him, to all who served, and especially to those who volunteered to put themselves in harm’s way as a result of this outrageous indignity. We owe you a debt we can never repay. Bless.

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  1. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    President Trump marked the infamous anniversary with new sanctions against Hezbollah, the Shiite terrorist group, supported by the Iranian Kohmenist regime, responsible for the bombing.

    • #1
  2. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    I was an NROTC midshipman deployed on a summer cruise on the USS Valley Forge, then the flagship of an anti-submarine warfare task force, in July 1958. We were scheduled for a nice trip down the St. Lawrence Seaway and some time in Quebec City. That all changed with the Lebanese Crises of 1958 which resulted in President Eisenhower’s very first execution of the Eisenhower Doctrine to assist nations friendly to America when threatened by international communism. We went back to Norfolk,  got resupplied including arms and ammunitions and spent the remainder of the summer on ASW maneuvers in the Atlantic.That summer’s action was centered in Beirut as well.

    Thanks for your post.

    • #2
  3. She Member
    She
    @She

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    I was an NROTC midshipman deployed on a summer cruise on the USS Valley Forge, then the flagship of an anti-submarine warfare task force, in July 1958. We were scheduled for a nice trip down the St. Lawrence Seaway and some time in Quebec City. That all changed with the Lebanese Crises of 1958 which resulted in President Eisenhower’s very first execution of the Eisenhower Doctrine to assist nations friendly to America when threatened by international communism. We went back to Norfolk, got resupplied including arms and ammunitions and spent the remainder of the summer on ASW maneuvers in the Atlantic.That summer’s action was centered in Beirut as well.

    Thanks for your post.

    No thanks necessary.  Thank you.  I’m a Brit, and therefore suspect, but my heart’s in the right place (or so those who are related to me by marriage tell me).

    • #3
  4. EODmom Coolidge
    EODmom
    @EODmom

    @she Thank you for remembering and recognizing the day and your colleague. You demonstrate that history is not something static and dusty, but continuous. 

    • #4
  5. She Member
    She
    @She

    EODmom (View Comment):

    @she Thank you for remembering and recognizing the day and your colleague. You demonstrate that history is not something static and dusty, but continuous.

    So very true.  I don’t know any other way to look at it, and in a small way, I hope my posts show that.  Thank you to you, your brave family, and your brave son.  

    • #5
  6. EODmom Coolidge
    EODmom
    @EODmom

    She (View Comment):

    EODmom (View Comment):

    @she Thank you for remembering and recognizing the day and your colleague. You demonstrate that history is not something static and dusty, but continuous.

    So very true. I don’t know any other way to look at it, and in a small way, I hope my posts show that. Thank you to you, your brave family, and your brave son.

    They do. And I am sure that your daily life communicates it to all who know you. Our boy says over and over that he never thought he would be one of the ones doing the work he does. He really considers himself lucky. He can’t say enough how highly he thinks of his colleagues and the extraordinary training and skill and intention they bring to every situation. He really thinks he’s the lucky one to work with them. I consider myself blessed beyond measure to be able to know him the rest of my life. I’m feeling sappy because we go see the Whole Circus, as he calls it, next week. 

    • #6
  7. Nanda Panjandrum Member
    Nanda Panjandrum
    @

    Thanks for this!  Rest easy, brothers…The day’s commemoration was memorable, stirring remarks by current CMDT Neller and then-CMDT Gray. Semper Fidelis. We will not forget!

    • #7
  8. Jim George Member
    Jim George
    @JimGeorge

    She: Thank you to him, to all who served, and especially to those who volunteered to put themselves in harm’s way as a result of this outrageous indignity. We owe you a debt we can never repay. Bless.

    I could not possibly improve on that expression of an appreciation which can never really be adequately expressed, just as no words, other, perhaps, than the obvious, could ever express my appreciation for, and dedication to the ideals of, The Few, The Brave, The Marines. 

    Semper Fidelis! May God Bless them all! 

    God Bless America!

    • #8
  9. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    The President and Secretary of Defense commemorated the Marines who were murdered. Here is a portion of President Trump’s remarks:

    In the days after the attack, very brave General Al Gray traveled to more than 150 funerals of his beloved Marines who perished in the Beirut bombing.

    On one of those trips, he arrived at Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama. There, he joined the hour-long funeral procession to transport a fallen Marine to his final resting place in a small town near Auburn, Alabama.

    On that long drive, General Gray witnessed a sight that would stay with him forever. Throughout the entire journey – along both sides of the highway, for miles and miles of country road, as far as the eye could see — everyday citizens, who came by the thousands, were lined up to pay their highest respects. They were waving flags, holding hands, holding their hands also over their hearts, and standing in silent salute to our great fallen Marine heroes.

    This outpouring of love and devotion was but a small measure of the eternal gratitude of our nation. In all of our history, no figure has ever lived with more grace and courage than the men and women who serve our country in uniform. They are God’s blessing to us all. They are God’s blessing. (Applause.) They are incredible, incredible people.

    Secretary Mattis’s remarks were not transcribed, but start at 16:24 on the C-SPAN video.

    • #9
  10. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    It’s important not to forget. I have a friend in Dallas who’s a Marine – I say “Marine” rather than “retired Marine” even though he’s in his 50s now, because as you and others here know, they’re a Marine for the rest of their lives. He is remembering Beirut today, too.

    • #10
  11. She Member
    She
    @She

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    It’s important not to forget. I have a friend in Dallas who’s a Marine – I say “Marine” rather than “retired Marine” even though he’s in his 50s now, because as you and others here know, they’re a Marine for the rest of their lives. He is remembering Beirut today, too.

    Yes, I do know that.  Mr. She is a Marine.  For life, and despite his 35-year subsequent career as a college professor.  My purpose here was just to say that Brian had left the Corps and was working in a different venue when I knew him.  But, as you say, it’s for life, for better, and sometimes for worse.

    • #11
  12. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    She (View Comment):

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    It’s important not to forget. I have a friend in Dallas who’s a Marine – I say “Marine” rather than “retired Marine” even though he’s in his 50s now, because as you and others here know, they’re a Marine for the rest of their lives. He is remembering Beirut today, too.

    Yes, I do know that. Mr. She is a Marine. For life, and despite his 35-year subsequent career as a college professor. My purpose here was just to say that Brian had left the Corps and was working in a different venue when I knew him. But, as you say, it’s for life, for better, and sometimes for worse.

    Oh I see now you used the word retired in parentheses – my intent wasn’t to contradict you.

    • #12
  13. She Member
    She
    @She

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    She (View Comment):

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    It’s important not to forget. I have a friend in Dallas who’s a Marine – I say “Marine” rather than “retired Marine” even though he’s in his 50s now, because as you and others here know, they’re a Marine for the rest of their lives. He is remembering Beirut today, too.

    Yes, I do know that. Mr. She is a Marine. For life, and despite his 35-year subsequent career as a college professor. My purpose here was just to say that Brian had left the Corps and was working in a different venue when I knew him. But, as you say, it’s for life, for better, and sometimes for worse.

    Oh I see now you used the word retired in parentheses – my intent wasn’t to contradict you.

    No, I got that. All’s good. 

    • #13
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