Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Evelyn Waugh on Randolph Churchill

 

Winston Churchill was neglected by his parents. He made the opposite mistake with his only son, Randolph, and spoiled him. After hearing that doctors had removed a benign tumor from Randolph, Evelyn Waugh noted in his diary:

“A typical triumph of modern science to find the only part of Randolph that was not malignant and remove it.” (March 1964)

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  1. Arahant Member

    Catty, but funny.

    • #1
    • September 21, 2018, at 7:55 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  2. CB Toder aka Mama Toad Member
    CB Toder aka Mama Toad Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    It was either @titustechera or @FlaggTaylor at my recent Meetup who mentioned that a list of great women writers included Evelyn Waugh because Evelyn, you know…

    Great quote.

    • #2
    • September 21, 2018, at 8:10 AM PDT
    • 7 likes
  3. Vectorman Thatcher

    Richard Easton: Winston Churchill was neglected by his parents. He made the opposite mistake with his only son Randolph who was spoiled.

    An excellent movie on Churchill shows this aspect of Randolph. His 1st entrance:


    This entry is part of our Quote of the Day series. We have 4 openings on the  September Schedule for your wisdom, with 3 next week. We’ve even include tips for finding great quotes. It’s the easiest way to start a Ricochet conversation, so why not sign up today?

    • #3
    • September 21, 2018, at 8:48 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  4. CB Toder aka Mama Toad Member
    CB Toder aka Mama Toad Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Loki, we hardly knew ye…

    • #4
    • September 21, 2018, at 8:53 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  5. Fritz Member

    CB Toder aka Mama Toad (View Comment):

    It was either @titustechera or @FlaggTaylor at my recent Meetup who mentioned that a list of great women writers included Evelyn Waugh because Evelyn, you know…

    Great quote.

    I read that Waugh married a woman whose name was also Evelyn, and they became known as

    “He-velyn” and “She-velyn.”

    Heh.

    • #5
    • September 21, 2018, at 2:06 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  6. Randy Webster Member

    When I read the title, I thought you were talking about Winston’s father.

    • #6
    • September 21, 2018, at 4:19 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  7. Titus Techera Contributor

    Fritz (View Comment):

    CB Toder aka Mama Toad (View Comment):

    It was either @titustechera or @FlaggTaylor at my recent Meetup who mentioned that a list of great women writers included Evelyn Waugh because Evelyn, you know…

    Great quote.

    I read that Waugh married a woman whose name was also Evelyn, and they became known as

    “He-velyn” and “She-velyn.”

    Heh.

    First wife, yeah. She broke his heart & made even more of a Catholic, let’s say, of him.

    • #7
    • September 21, 2018, at 7:04 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  8. Steve C. Member

    As unsympathetic to Randolph as I am, it had to be tough being Winston’s son.

    • #8
    • September 21, 2018, at 8:22 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  9. Arahant Member

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    When I read the title, I thought you were talking about Winston’s father.

    That would have been “Lord Randolph.”

    • #9
    • September 22, 2018, at 2:15 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  10. Randy Webster Member

    Sure. I’ve read my “The Last Lion.”

    • #10
    • September 22, 2018, at 3:30 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  11. Titus Techera Contributor

    Steve C. (View Comment):

    As unsympathetic to Randolph as I am, it had to be tough being Winston’s son.

    It seems in such families, there is a private price to pay for the public greatness of the statesman.

    Adamses were even more that way.

     

    • #11
    • September 22, 2018, at 4:22 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  12. Steve C. Member

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Sure. I’ve read my “The Last Lion.”

    The first volume, Manchester at his peak. 

    • #12
    • September 22, 2018, at 6:24 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  13. Randy Webster Member

    I read the second, and started the third, but haven’t finished it.

    • #13
    • September 22, 2018, at 7:34 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  14. Steve C. Member

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    I read the second, and started the third, but haven’t finished it.

    Well, if you are a completist, like me, soldier on. It’s clearly not Manchester, but it’s well written and informative. Personally, the first was best for several reasons. Manchester at his best and all the details he marshaled and told in a very informative and engaging story. Key word, story!

    The second volume was interesting for the behind the scenes war stuff. And I was intrigued that he wasn’t so healthy as I expected. Plus Churchill’s growing realization that while Britain had sacrificed much and held the line from 1939 through 1941, it was to be eclipsed dramatically in 1945 at the moment of triumph. Still, throughout v2 I kept saying to myself, “I know all the war stuff, get on with it.”

    Volume 3 is a necessary conclusion. But aside from the Iron Curtain speech, it’s mostly a tale of inside British baseball and Churchill’s desperate attempt to influence the post war world, and cling to power. A man who refused to recognize his time had passed and ironically couldn’t appreciate that if had done nothing else after 1945, his place in history was more than secure.

     

    • #14
    • September 22, 2018, at 9:18 AM PDT
    • Like
  15. Randy Webster Member

    Steve C. (View Comment):
    A man who refused to recognize his time had passed

    A common failing. It’s a shame Churchill was afflicted by it.

    • #15
    • September 22, 2018, at 10:06 AM PDT
    • Like
  16. Steve C. Member

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Steve C. (View Comment):
    A man who refused to recognize his time had passed

    A common failing. It’s a shame Churchill was afflicted by it.

    Only human. Maybe more so than most.

    One thing that rings very loudly is the incessant panting after “office”. I guess that’s where there was a clear distinction between Parliament and our Congress. Being a Congressman, even more so a Senator, comes with lots of influence and informal power. Plus a salary. Even if you are in the minority, there’s bureaucrats to smooze with or intimidate, money to allocate, legislation to log roll.

    In Churchill’s day an MP needed a source of income. And if you are in the minority, you might have some influence based on old ties or social standing. Even in the majority, you were subject to the general will of party leaders. It’s very clear from the first volume that the party whip was the Luca Brazzi who kept everyone in line.You didn’t want to cause them to “withdraw the whip”. It pretty much ended your career.

    It was quite an education and one well delivered.

    • #16
    • September 22, 2018, at 10:53 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  17. Randy Webster Member

    I think I’ve read it twice, maybe thrice, but it’s been many years since the last time.

    • #17
    • September 22, 2018, at 10:56 AM PDT
    • Like

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