Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Are Social Media Platforms Tearing Apart Society’s Social Fabric?

 

Chamath Palihapitiya, one of the early Facebook software engineers tasked a year after its founding with growing Facebook’s user base, warns that Facebook, in which he claims he has only posted on his own account less than 10 times in seven years, and other social media platforms are destroying how society works. Palihapitiya cautions that the dopamine effect of instant gratification with receiving likes encourages addiction to Facebook and other platforms. By the way, please “Like” this post because I need to know you like me … you really like me.

Palihapitiya also warns that bad actors can use social media to manipulate large swaths of people to do regrettable and terrible things. In addition to the example that he cites in the video above, it’s clear that he’s absolutely correct given the teens and pre-teens who have been badgered and bullied on Facebook and other sites who have sadly taken their own lives – such is the value placed on acceptance and social media friendship which passes for real friendship. Psychologists and researchers, as Palihapitiya as, have also studied and expressed concern about the addictive aspects of social media and the negative consequences of replacing face-to-face human interaction.

Given some of the recent controversies in how the management teams of Facebook, Twitter and Google’s YouTube screen and censor what they deem as offensive or abusive material, it should also be evident that the stewards of such sites may be as easily manipulated as the users they regulate. Some have called for closer government oversight of social media platforms – as the FCC purportedly does with radio and television; while others see that as a potential Orwellian intrusion that’s rife for manipulation by those with even more pronounced political agendas than the social justice warriors at Google, Twitter, and Facebook.

As an old fuddy-duddy, the product of an era when children sought out the companionship of other kids to play outdoors and were encouraged to do so by parents who were tired of their offspring’s bickering. We didn’t have Xboxes or Playstations. We didn’t have smartphones or tablets and so weren’t distracted when they beeped, chimed, or alerted us when someone had responded to our latest Facebook post. We pretended to be knights or battling WWII soldiers, or Errol Flynn brandishing swords that were sticks used by builders to plot out residential lots. We played in houses being constructed when work crews left them idle on weekends — walking through the unfinished framed walls of fresh pine lumber occasionally smearing sap on our jeans or shirts. We played “Spot,” which was essentially hide-and-seek with a flashlight. We had water balloon fights. We jumped on the bus that took us to the community pool in summer and ogled at the hot-looking, bikini-clad woman lifeguard. We hiked around the nearby hills and climbed trees and built tree forts. And we played baseball and football and basketball on the street or at nearby parks. I know kids between the ages of six and 16 or 18 still do all that but my guess is to a lesser extent. But, for my own edification, how much are social media platforms consuming the hours of today’s kids … and adults?

Organized play demands collaboration and cooperation and kids out of boredom will agree to constantly change the game’s rules to make whatever the game is more interesting. In those activities, the social fabric is woven and stitched together and kids as they become adults rely on that foundational experience of collaboration, concession, cooperation and at least some measure of respect to get along. Social media, particularly Facebook and Twitter seems to unravel that.

It seems to me that when those face-to-face interactive experiences are diminished or minimized then adults are more inept at communicating, collaborating or cooperating with one another. And thus, adults, and I am guilty of this as anyone is, retreat into comfortable silos of social groups that reinforce their own views and temperaments.

I’m sure many of you, out of frustration, out of exhaustion at having to deal with rude, crude, or demeaning comments, have taken a break from social media, or just to get away from the keyboard to circulate the blood in your legs and experience life in the real world … you know, the one out there. To replenish one’s spirit or soul, as it were. It’s a bit heretical of me to even discuss doing so here on Ricochet, given the site’s constant need to boost subscribers but out of curiosity, do you feel you are doing enough to regulate your children’s time (if you have children at home) on social media or your own? Would you be a better person, a more thoughtful and engaging person if you didn’t spend so much time on social media? Or would you feel that you are missing out on so much of what’s going on and feel isolated and disconnected from society and the world if you cut back on your time on Facebook, Twitter, and other sites?

I don’t have any easy answers. I’m as captivated as everyone else. I realize there are far better things I could be doing with my time. But I did feel compelled to bring this up and share it on a social media site. Hi, my name’s Brian and I may have an addiction.

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  1. CB Toder aka Mama Toad Member
    CB Toder aka Mama ToadJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I really do, Brian.

    • #1
    • December 27, 2017, at 12:22 PM PST
    • 1 like
  2. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHillJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Brian Watt: I’m sure many of you, out of frustration, out of exhaustion at having to deal with rude, crude, or demeaning comments, have taken a break from social media, or just to get away from the keyboard to circulate the blood in your legs and experience life in the real world…you know, the one out there.

    WHAT? There’s something… out… there?

    • #2
    • December 27, 2017, at 12:30 PM PST
    • 7 likes
  3. RyanFalcone Member

    I’ve largely abandoned Facebook for over a year and its been great. Being blissfully ignorant of just how idiotic everyone else is has been a relief.

    • #3
    • December 27, 2017, at 12:55 PM PST
    • 13 likes
  4. James Gawron Thatcher
    James GawronJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Brian,

    I have always found Facebook to be strange and annoying. There is no technological achievement in it only an extremely shrewd marketing strategy. Zuckerberg to me is a lightweight with a huge amount of money made by selling a fad like the hula hoop. Brenden Eich was for real and wrote the code himself for his competitive browser. The silicon valley zombies killed Eich and made a demigod out of Zuckerberg.

    In 2010 I was working on a congressional campaign. We were in a district that was held by a Democrat and had a rating of about +7 Democratic. We had a great candidate but it was an uphill fight. I realized the potential of Facebook as a political campaign tool. Everybody was posting their personal stuff and activities on their facebook page and friending people who were mostly local. A congressional district is small so mostly local was great. I put no personal information on my Facebook page and simply used the scheme of “friending” to geometrically amplify any message I wished to post. I think using Facebook in this rather Machiavellian mode was quite effective.

    When the campaign was over (we had won), I shut off the Facebook page as I found what was going on normally on Facebook both boring and somewhat crazy. The whole marketing concept (and there is little else) of Facebook was meant to be addictive. Unfortunately, social media isn’t limited to Facebook. Twitter which came alive only with the advent of smartphones is also a purely addictive activity. The phone companies love it. They sell premium phones at an immense retail markup along with phone service also at an immense retail markup. Get those twelve-year-olds texting their friends all the time. Then they can progress to a Facebook page at fourteen and finally have twitter arguments about nothing they know about at seventeen. Success for silicon valley and zip for the rest of us.

    I don’t think social media is responsible for “tearing apart society’s social fabric”. It is left-wing propaganda that is tearing apart society’s social fabric, not to mention destroying respect for free speech, and undermining the family. Social media just amplifies this. However, pushback from the right is also on social media. Critics of Palihapitiya’s type are usually interested in blaming the media for the negative effects of leftwing doctrine while avoiding responsibility for it. In fact, they will then use this as a pretext to censor rightwing content on social media which further accelerates the disaster.

    When Trump tweets we need to grasp that of the 50 members of the White House press corps there isn’t a single registered Republican. This is the surest guarantee of leftwing bias that is imaginable.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #4
    • December 27, 2017, at 12:58 PM PST
    • 15 likes
  5. Brian Watt Member
    Brian WattJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    EJHill (View Comment):

    Brian Watt: I’m sure many of you, out of frustration, out of exhaustion at having to deal with rude, crude, or demeaning comments, have taken a break from social media, or just to get away from the keyboard to circulate the blood in your legs and experience life in the real world…you know, the one out there.

    WHAT? There’s something… out… there?

    Yeah, but it’s vastly overrated.

    • #5
    • December 27, 2017, at 12:58 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  6. OldDanRhody's speakeasy Member

    I protest, sir! I’m not just sitting here in my comfortably padded chair reading random posts on Ricochet, I’m busily letting some frozen chicken thaw for supper. Sure, it would probably be for my social betterment if I were to wander down to the local tavern once in a while to interact with some of my actual neighbors, but that would involve walking six blocks. Each way.
    And by the way,

    Brian Watt: We jumped on the bus that took us to the community pool in summer and ogled at the hot-looking, bikini-clad woman lifeguard.

    Was this you?
    Related image

    • #6
    • December 27, 2017, at 1:19 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  7. Brian Watt Member
    Brian WattJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Major Major Major Major (View Comment):
    I protest, sir! I’m not just sitting here in my comfortably padded chair reading random posts on Ricochet, I’m busily letting some frozen chicken thaw for supper. Sure, it would probably be for my social betterment if I were to wander down to the local tavern once in a while to interact with some of my actual neighbors, but that would involve walking six blocks. Each way.
    And by the way,

    Brian Watt: We jumped on the bus that took us to the community pool in summer and ogled at the hot-looking, bikini-clad woman lifeguard.

    Was this you?
    Related image

    Uh…no…I only become more portly later in life.

    • #7
    • December 27, 2017, at 1:22 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  8. Front Seat Cat Member

    RyanFalcone (View Comment):
    I’ve largely abandoned Facebook for over a year and its been great. Being blissfully ignorant of just how idiotic everyone else is has been a relief.

    Me too – one year and not going back – I never did Twitter. I grew up doing everything you did, minus football and ogling girl lifeguards – we had a blast with little to nothing! Now I pass entire families in restaurants, parking lots, etc. texting and checking phones all at the same time – little conversation. Your story nails it – all of it – it’s a mess and its having the opposite effect in many ways on the “goal”. There are good things about it – connecting people in good ways – like sharing medical ideas or fundraising, but the rest of it is mindless crap.

    I enjoy Ricochet because of the stories – like reading a really good newspaper – I would enjoy it without likes or comments just as much – by the way = I triple like your post!

    • #8
    • December 27, 2017, at 1:29 PM PST
    • 8 likes
  9. Front Seat Cat Member

    His next idea is building a global community:

    I know a lot of us are thinking about how we can make the most positive impact in the world right now. I wrote this…

    Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday, February 16, 2017

    then:

    http://money.cnn.com/2017/06/22/technology/facebook-zuckerberg-interview/index.html

    • #9
    • December 27, 2017, at 1:37 PM PST
    • Like
  10. David Foster Member
    David FosterJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Marshall McLuhan referred to a technology-created ‘Global Village’. Today’s Internet-based technologies drive us much further in this direction than did the technologies of McLuhan’s time.

    The thing is, villages has negative as well as positive attributes, and these attributes are amplified by Facebook and especially by Twitter. Clarence Thomas spoke of a ‘high-tech lynching’; we are now seeing higher-tech lynchings conducted on an industrial scale.

    I wrote about this topic in my post Freedom, the Village, and the Internet.

    • #10
    • December 27, 2017, at 1:48 PM PST
    • 1 like
  11. Ralphie Member

    from 3 John 1:14 : “But I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be to thee. Our friends salute thee. Greet the friends by name.”

    Face to face seems to have always been a better way of communicating, and people wrote letters, which is kind of like facebook, et. al. It seems to me that many believe that technology replaces face to face, which is not true, and many of us know that.

    • #11
    • December 27, 2017, at 1:49 PM PST
    • 1 like
  12. James Gawron Thatcher
    James GawronJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):
    His next idea is building a global community:

    (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.11’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

    I know a lot of us are thinking about how we can make the most positive impact in the world right now. I wrote this…

    Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday, February 16, 2017

    then:

    http://money.cnn.com/2017/06/22/technology/facebook-zuckerberg-interview/index.html

    FSC,

    What I’d like to know is what Zuckerberg thinks about what happened to Eich. Until he can tell me that Eich donating $1,000 in secret to an organization that didn’t believe in SSM wasn’t hate speech and that it was Eich that was unfairly treated, I wouldn’t trust anything Zuckerberg did or said. He blows vacuous catchphrases and then sits back to rake in the cash. He’d follow the cash even if it led him straight to hell.

    I’m not going along for the ride.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #12
    • December 27, 2017, at 1:52 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  13. Doug Watt Moderator

    I still have a Facebook page, although except for immediate family it gets very little use. My friends list is rather small, and of course it’s a private page. Actually my friends list in the real world is rather small. It’s not that I don’t like people, it’s just that some people are more likable from a distance, and sometimes the less you know about someone is good for them.

    I’m always a bit surprised when someone who has a Facebook friend that goes off the rails claims they just didn’t see it coming. For example the individual that stabbed two people to death on a light rail train in Portland. Anyone who posts the garbage that this guy did, and then called himself the Lizard King should give you a pretty good clue that something was wrong with him, and something was wrong with you for adding yourself to his Friends list.

    • #13
    • December 27, 2017, at 2:19 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  14. Larry Koler Inactive

    James Gawron (View Comment):
    I don’t think social media is responsible for “tearing apart society’s social fabric”. It is left-wing propaganda that is tearing apart society’s social fabric, not to mention destroying respect for free speech, and undermining the family. Social media just amplifies this.

    I agree — I’m not that worried about social media but I’m extremely worried about the left’s control of so many of our institutions. They mean to do us harm.

    • #14
    • December 27, 2017, at 2:29 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  15. Larry Koler Inactive

    Doug Watt (View Comment):
    I still have a Facebook page, although except for immediate family it gets very little use. My friends list is rather small, and of course it’s a private page. Actually my friends list in the real world is rather small. It’s not that I don’t like people, it’s just that some people are more likable from a distance, and sometimes the less you know about someone is good for them.

    This is me, too. I use it only for family and close friends. Also, I have several friends in India that I wouldn’t know much about except when I visit there — instead, I’m up to date on all their doings and how things are going with their families whenever see each other again.

    WhatsApp is great, too.

    I have to say that Ricochet is where I spend more time than any social media. Social media just doesn’t grab me the same way. And I’ve made friends here — that I wouldn’t have made any other way at all.

    I think the guy in the video, Chamath Palihapitiya, is an alarmist. Even with the example that he gives, I’m not worried.

    • #15
    • December 27, 2017, at 2:37 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  16. Brian Watt Member
    Brian WattJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Major Major Major Major (View Comment):
    I protest, sir! I’m not just sitting here in my comfortably padded chair reading random posts on Ricochet, I’m busily letting some frozen chicken thaw for supper. Sure, it would probably be for my social betterment if I were to wander down to the local tavern once in a while to interact with some of my actual neighbors, but that would involve walking six blocks. Each way.

    You may want to read this. It looks like a jaunt to your local tavern may actually prolong your life. The alcohol, of course could also have a preservative effect…especially if you routinely get pickled. I’m also reminded of John Candy in Splash:

    • #16
    • December 27, 2017, at 2:59 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  17. Percival Thatcher
    PercivalJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Brian Watt: Palihapitiya also warns that bad actors can use social media to manipulate large swaths of people to do regrettable and terrible things.

    So can bad actors using more traditional media.

    Brian Watt: In addition to the example that he cites in the video above, it’s clear that he’s absolutely correct given the teens and pre-teens who have been badgered and bullied on Facebook and other sites who have sadly taken their own lives – such is the value placed on acceptance and social media friendship which passes for real friendship.

    Kids have been doing that for a long time too. There used to be more support structure out there, though.

    • #17
    • December 27, 2017, at 3:36 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  18. Percival Thatcher
    PercivalJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    RyanFalcone (View Comment):
    I’ve largely abandoned Facebook for over a year and its been great. Being blissfully ignorant of just how idiotic everyone else is has been a relief.

    Hey, I work hard to achieve my level of idiocy.

    • #18
    • December 27, 2017, at 3:37 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  19. MarciN Member

    I read a book a while ago by the neuroscientist Matt Lieberman (Social) that was very interesting. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Lieberman demonstrated, much to the surprise of psychologists, that social pain–particularly and especially the pain of rejection is processed by the same part of the brain that processes physical pain:

    In the abstract, Cyberball seems like a trivial game with a trivial outcome. Two “strangers” that you have never met stop throwing a digital ball to you in the most boring game of catch you will ever play. How is this relevant to anything that matters in your life? Being included by others when playing Cyberball won’t help you get better clothes, the job, or the girl. As a participant, you get paid the same for the study whether you are included or excluded. Everything about this study seems small and insignificant. But the implications are profound—that something so small produces such big effects. Our sensitivity to social rejection is so central to our well-being that our brains treat it like a painful event, whether the instance of social rejection matters or not. (near page 73)

    • #19
    • December 27, 2017, at 5:30 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  20. Brian Watt Member
    Brian WattJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Percival (View Comment):

    Brian Watt: Palihapitiya also warns that bad actors can use social media to manipulate large swaths of people to do regrettable and terrible things.

    So can bad actors using more traditional media.

    I think what’s different with social media rather than traditional media is that with social media there’s an instant feedback loop and a multiplier effect (think of it as a nuclear chain reaction) when a given idea, even a false idea, can go viral by a mob. This kind of viral reaction is rare with traditional media, especially pre-1993 when people actually read articles that were more than 200 characters or more than two paragraphs in length (or from those things known as books), say from a random editorial in the New York Times, WAPO or from the blathering of a commentator on a network news program.

    Today, if an editorial or some news anchor or pundit’s commentary is so outrageous or ridiculous it really needs Twitter or Facebook to proliferate it in order for the chain reaction to hit critical mass. Bad actors, at least the more cunning ones, understand this and realize that they can be more effective spreading disinformation more rapidly through social media than through traditional media. Though I do believe that many on the political Left seem to have figured this out quicker and are much more adept at this than those on the right, examples of targeted demonization abound across the political spectrum.

    The Tea Party movement probably couldn’t have grown so instantaneously had it not been for social media. Unfortunately, the same goes for Occupy Wall Street, Antifa and the Black Lives Matter movement as well. Lenin, Stalin, Hitler and Mao would have loved social media for the results they wanted to see at a much more rapid pace. It’s worthy of examination whether social media, had it been around at the time, could have also blunted their horrific ambitions and acts as well by engendering more rapid opposition to their plans. I’m not sure we’re likely to know. It is comforting that a movement like Antifa can quickly be ridiculed and lampooned for the fraudulent and idiotic movement that it is. Perhaps Marxists and Communist-sympathizers in the late 60s who rioted across the country would have come in for more powerful rebuke had the Silent Majority had Twitter and Facebook been at their fingertips.

    Social media certainly played a part in Hillary’s Clinton’s loss and Donald Trump’s rise to prominence, especially when those in traditional media thought that they could control the narrative and guarantee the opposite outcome of what occurred.

    • #20
    • December 27, 2017, at 6:12 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  21. formerlawprof Coolidge

    Way ahead of you, @brianwatt. I have never, ever, responded to anyone who tried to “friend” or otherwise reach me, whether it was my son or my brother or a close colleague. I have never had a twitter account, don’t know how to get one, and have never followed anyone. And this is all for strictly ideological reasons, along the lines suggested in the OP.

    It is true that I was pleased to join Ricochet and participate in spurts, and I am active on a Listserv or Chat Group in my legal field. But I see those as totally different.

    • #21
    • December 27, 2017, at 7:33 PM PST
    • 1 like
  22. David Foster Member
    David FosterJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Brian Watt (View Comment):
    I think what’s different with social media rather than traditional media is that with social media there’s an instant feedback loop and a multiplier effect (think of it as a nuclear chain reaction) when a given idea, even a false idea, can go viral by a mob.

    Yes. For a horrible example, see Lynchings and Witch-Trials, Technology-Enhanced.

    • #22
    • December 27, 2017, at 7:59 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  23. Brian Watt Member
    Brian WattJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    formerlawprof (View Comment):
    Way ahead of you, @brianwatt. I have never, ever, responded to anyone who tried to “friend” or otherwise reach me, whether it was my son or my brother or a close colleague. I have never had a twitter account, don’t know how to get one, and have never followed anyone. And this is all for strictly ideological reasons, along the lines suggested in the OP.

    It is true that I was pleased to join Ricochet and participate in spurts, and I am active on a Listserv or Chat Group in my legal field. But I see those as totally different.

    Well, I have 190 Facebook friends, which my guess is below or well below the average…and feeble for a writer or marketing professional who wants to evangelize his own work. Of those, a handful are relatives. Others are close friends or current or former business colleagues, and others I corresponded with or met along the way since I became active writing on political and cultural issues, initially in some conservative commentary blogs, Tea Party sites and eventually on Ricochet. Over half are folks I’ve never personally met but generally behave themselves and are very polite and many don’t comment at all on current events. About six or so years ago, I purged hundreds of FB friends because they were either too extreme or I never ever heard from them on any topic. I’m pretty strict now about decent behavior and if attacked will block the offending party immediately. Admittedly, as I indicated in the OP, I probably spend too much time on Facebook but I use it more often than not to promote something I’ve just written.

    I’ve also used the site to promote various business interests or to follow the commentary of folks I respect (Jordan Peterson, Michael Ramirez, David Carter, Dave Sussman, Rachel Lu, Mollie Hemingway, Peter Robinson, Andrew Klavan, John Yoo, VDH, Bill Gertz, Charles Murray, Jack Fowler, Jim Lakely, Jon Gabriel, a few conservative politicians, several fellow Rico members, and other notable personalities).

    I maintain a Twitter account but rarely use it. When I do, it’s to promote my own business or a venture I’m promoting or occasionally highlighting some piece I’ve written that I feel is worthy of being read by others and is appearing on another site. Twitter commentary tends to be much more extreme and hysterical than what’s on Facebook. I think that’s due in large part to the character count limitation even though they’ve expanded it. Sort of like feeling the need to say something extremely inflammatory and sensational as you’re being pushed out of a plane without a parachute.

    Bottom line, these sites can be useful if you manage them properly. If they consume most of your waking hours, then you have a problem and need step away and challenge yourself to engage in the real world.

    • #23
    • December 27, 2017, at 8:30 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  24. Mendel Member
    MendelJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    We always gravitate toward the partisan aspects of social media, but I think the psychological/neurochemical element is also worth considering.

    In many ways, the basic functions of social media are just digital reconstructions of very typical human interactions. However, the way a “like” – which is permanent and available for all to see – delivers positive reinforcement is indeed much different than your friends nodding their heads in agreement or saying “yeah” when you make a comment at lunch. And this type of pleasure does in fact seem designed to make us become much more addicted to the positive feedback of social media than to the positive feedback of normal social encounters.

    Still, I wonder if this is a phase we’ll adapt out of at some point. After all, when computer games hit the scene they also provided a similar dopamine punch of instant (but fleeting) reward, and yet the predicted apocalypse of young men doing nothing but playing computer games has…..only sort of come true.

    Heck, for a while the biggest dopamine kick of all – cocaine – was taking over the country, and its method of addiction was predicted to be impossible to overcome.

    Is the dopamine rush of social media different? We’ll see, I guess.

    • #24
    • December 28, 2017, at 2:47 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  25. David Foster Member
    David FosterJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I was recently reading a Henry Fielding novel from the 1750s….one character he portrayed was a society woman who desperately had to have her social calendar filled up with the right kind of people, but didn’t care much about them other than as a checkmark on aforesaid calendar. Struck me that the satisfaction she got from this, the dopamine rush if you will, was probably much like that which a certain kind of FB users get from their ‘likes’.

    • #25
    • December 28, 2017, at 5:41 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  26. Percival Thatcher
    PercivalJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    David Foster (View Comment):
    I was recently reading a Henry Fielding novel from the 1750s….one character he portrayed was a society woman who desperately had to have her social calendar filled up with the right kind of people, but didn’t care much about them other than as a checkmark on aforesaid calendar. Struck me that the satisfaction she got from this, the dopamine rush if you will, was probably much like that which a certain kind of FB users get from their ‘likes’.

    Now I feel bad about liking that. Sorry.

    • #26
    • December 28, 2017, at 6:04 AM PST
    • 1 like
  27. SkipSul Coolidge
    SkipSulJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member