Quote of the Day: Perspective

 

“A change in perspective is worth 80 IQ points.” — Alan Kay

I ran across this and, after @rayharvey’s conversation, it seemed appropriate. I have often found it to be true. In some circles, a phrase is used, “You can’t solve the problem on the level of the problem.” Trying to shift perspective and see things in new ways can be a very powerful experience and transform problems into wonderful new opportunities.

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  1. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    This is the Quote of the Day, and if you would like to show how smart you are (by finding someone even smarter to quote), You can sign up to take a Quote of the Day here.

    • #1
  2. OldDan Rhody Member
    OldDan Rhody
    @OldDanRhody

    Arahant: Trying to shift perspective and see things in new ways can be a very powerful experience and transform problems into wonderful new opportunities.

    You are correct, sir. And sometimes an “outsider,” someone who’s own basis of understanding is completely different from your own, can provide that perspective – even though you may not initially welcome it.

    • #2
  3. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    That is why the first person who walks up to look at the problem with your code sees it right away.

    • #3
  4. Trink Coolidge
    Trink
    @Trink

    Arahant:

    A change in perspective is worth 80 IQ points.—Alan Kay

    I ran across this, and after @rayharvey‘s conversation, it seemed appropriate. I have often found it to be true. In some circles, a phrase is used, “You can’t solve the problem on the level of the problem.” Trying to shift perspective and see things in new ways can be a very powerful experience and transform problems into wonderful new opportunities.

     
    Amen! Very timely for me, my friend :)

    • #4
  5. MLH Inactive
    MLH
    @MLH

    Too bad someone had a different perspective on Ray’s post and changed the topic to his hair. . .

    • #5
  6. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I also find that not reacting immediately but letting a problem simmer gives me a different, clearer perspective. If I wait just a bit, a solution will often emerge that I’m quite certain would not have been apparent in the earlier moment. Good quote, A!

    • #6
  7. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    MLH (View Comment):
    Too bad someone had a different perspective on Ray’s post and changed the topic to his hair. . .

    If ya got it, flaunt it, I says.

    • #7
  8. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    I also find that not reacting immediately but letting a problem simmer gives me a different, clearer perspective. If I wait just a bit, a solution will often emerge that I’m quite certain would not have been apparent in the earlier moment.

    When I was a child, I read lots of biographies of great and famous men. I think it might have been in a biography of the fiery Andrew Jackson where he was taught to count to ten before reacting, which cut down on his number of fights. (And think about the number he still had.)

    • #8
  9. Judge Mental Member
    Judge Mental
    @JudgeMental

    Perspective definitely makes a difference. I could relate a couple of long, detailed, incredibly boring stories about how being willing to abandon an approach and try something completely different on a piece of software led to a radically improved outcome.

    But it happened enough times that eventually I started looking for it whenever something was coming out as sub-par.

    • #9
  10. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Judge Mental (View Comment):
    But it happened enough times that eventually I started looking for it whenever something was coming out as sub-par.

    Which proved you were learning. I have found the same. This applies to any “cause” of anger or frustration. There is always another angle on the situation.

    • #10
  11. Boss Mongo Member
    Boss Mongo
    @BossMongo

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    I also find that not reacting immediately but letting a problem simmer gives me a different, clearer perspective. If I wait just a bit, a solution will often emerge that I’m quite certain would not have been apparent in the earlier moment. Good quote, A!

    Susan, totally agree. The skill is in knowing the difference between percolating and procrastinating.

    • #11
  12. Clavius Thatcher
    Clavius
    @Clavius

    Percival (View Comment):

    That is why the first person who walks up to look at the problem with your code sees it right away.

    Just when you have accumulated the evidence to prove there is an error in the compiler.

    • #12
  13. Clavius Thatcher
    Clavius
    @Clavius

    There is also the feeling of “how could I have been so dumb” when you see things from the new perspective.

    Also the “wow, what a cool solution!” On the opposite side.

    • #13
  14. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    OldDan Rhody (View Comment):

    You are correct, sir. And sometimes an “outsider,” someone who’s own basis of understanding is completely different from your own, can provide that perspective – even though you may not initially welcome it.

    POPE: Thank you for your perspective, despite its not being initially welcome.

    GALLILEO: …

    • #14
  15. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    Arahant (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    I also find that not reacting immediately but letting a problem simmer gives me a different, clearer perspective. If I wait just a bit, a solution will often emerge that I’m quite certain would not have been apparent in the earlier moment.

    When I was a child, I read lots of biographies of great and famous men. I think it might have been in a biography of the fiery Andrew Jackson where he was taught to count to ten before reacting, which cut down on his number of fights. (And think about the number he still had.)

    Andy ‘Flame War’ Jackson would never have survived the internet age.

    • #15
  16. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    Clavius (View Comment):
    There is also the feeling of “how could I have been so dumb” when you see things from the new perspective.

    Also the “wow, what a cool solution!” On the opposite side.

    You should be selective in feeding those two wolves.

    • #16
  17. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    This feels true. When we engage a problem, we do it with our knowledge and tools…ourselves. Perspective shift involves admitting that we were wrong about our bespoke square peg in regard to the curvilinear hole in question. Re-tooling has costs.

    • #17
  18. Judge Mental Member
    Judge Mental
    @JudgeMental

    TBA (View Comment):
    This feels true. When we engage a problem, we do it with our knowledge and tools…ourselves. Perspective shift involves admitting that we were wrong about our bespoke square peg in regard to the curvilinear hole in question. Re-tooling has costs.

    The price doesn’t have to be that high. In the situations I mentioned above, it was more like pounding on the front door, not getting in, and sneaking around and climbing the back fence. All I had to admit was that pounding on the front door didn’t work.

    • #18
  19. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Clavius (View Comment):
    There is also the feeling of “how could I have been so dumb” when you see things from the new perspective.

    I have experienced this feeling many times. The most life-changing one was when, in my mid-20s, I started to see the Left for what they really are and realized I was a Conservative. The rest of the “How could I have been so dumb” moments mostly had to do with men haha

    • #19
  20. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    TBA (View Comment):
    Andy ‘Flame War’ Jackson would never have survived the internet age.

    Heh, now there is one we should have had in the Presidential Twitter Feed.

    • #20

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