Where Can You Most Easily Contract Venereal Disease?

 

I pose a question that you no doubt do not often ask yourself. But, in case you ever have or ever will, D.C. McCallister is ready, willing, and able to provide the requisite information, and she can tell you where you can go if you want to minimize the likelihood.

To wit, the following states in rank order are the places where venereal disease is most likely to be found: Alaska, Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Arkansas, Delaware, and my native Oklahoma. And here are the states in rank order where you are least likely to encounter such difficulties: Vermont, New Hampshire, West Virginia, Maine, Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New Jersey.

Of course, if you are married and you and your spouse both practice fidelity, you can live anywhere without peril. This may explain why there is no overlap at all between the states, also listed in rank order, where the most sexual activity goes on and the states where VD is most common: California, Texas, New York, Oregon, Colorado, Arizona, Washington, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Missouri. As George Bernard Shaw once put it, matrimony combines the maximum of temptation with the maximum of opportunity.

You might want to wrestle with D.C.’s analysis of the reason why certain states are on the first of these three lists. I suggest that you ponder as well the reason why the states on the second list are there. There is a tale to be told about patterns of human conduct, and it has next to nothing to do with class.

Published in Domestic Policy
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  1. Majestyk Contributor
    Majestyk
    @Majestyk

    I’m not sure why the notion that suggesting large portions of your population being poor or ill-educated as a causal mechanism for transmission of VD is controversial.

    What I would say is that D.C. skipped past what I regard as the elephant in that room, that being: How is it possible that all of these highly religious Southern States have these high rates of VD, while many less religious states on the other side of the spectrum have the least?

    Reality isn’t matching up with the general consensus of the center-right’s prescription.

    • #1
  2. DocJay Inactive
    DocJay
    @DocJay

    I may have lived in all those top states.  Coincidence?  I think not.

    • #2
  3. DocJay Inactive
    DocJay
    @DocJay

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    I’m not sure why the notion that suggesting large portions of your population being poor or ill-educated as a causal mechanism for transmission of VD is controversial.

    What I would say is that D.C. skipped past what I regard as the elephant in that room, that being: How is it possible that all of these highly religious Southern States have these high rates of VD, while many less religious states on the other side of the spectrum have the least?

    Reality isn’t matching up with the general consensus of the center-right’s prescription.

    Condom use is eschewed in the Black community and by  some Catholics of course.

    I mentioned birth control to a 20 yr mother of 8 kids (in Louisiana) from multiple baby daddy’s.  Her response was,”uh uh, honey , when it’s good, it’s good”.

    Your tax dollars at work.

    • #3
  4. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    DocJay (View Comment):
    I may have lived in all those top states. Coincidence? I think not.

    Practicing medicine out of a need for atonement, Doc?

    • #4
  5. DocJay Inactive
    DocJay
    @DocJay

    Titus Techera (View Comment):

    DocJay (View Comment):
    I may have lived in all those top states. Coincidence? I think not.

    Practicing medicine out of a need for atonement, Doc?

    No, need for Valtrex.  The stuff is pricey.

    • #5
  6. Gitter Member
    Gitter
    @TheRoyalFamily

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    What I would say is that D.C. skipped past what I regard as the elephant in that room, that being: How is it possible that all of these highly religious Southern States have these high rates of VD, while many less religious states on the other side of the spectrum have the least?

    Like with a lot of bad outcomes in these red states that liberals like to point at, higher proportions of blacks. Why that happens to be the case can be debated, but it is the case nonetheless. That’s the real elephant in the room.

    • #6
  7. Jim Beck Inactive
    Jim Beck
    @JimBeck

    Afternoon Doc,

    The article did not address how different sexual cultures have a greater number of sexual partners, and that the spread of these diseases is also a function of whether one or both partners have multiple partners. The article notes that the male homosexual community is showing the greatest increase in two types of disease, and yet does not seem to consider the behavior of this group, or how the behavior might have changed as the threat of HIV has fallen.  This type of partner analysis is common in public health studies and I did not see this type of analysis in the article.  To me this makes the article empty.  You are better on the public health issue what do you think.

    • #7
  8. DocJay Inactive
    DocJay
    @DocJay

    Jim Beck (View Comment):
    Afternoon Doc,

    The article did not address how different sexual cultures have a greater number of sexual partners, and that the spread of these diseases is also a function of whether one or both partners have multiple partners. The article notes that the male homosexual community is showing the greatest increase in two types of disease, and yet does not seem to consider the behavior of this group, or how the behavior might have changed as the threat of HIV has fallen. This type of partner analysis is common in public health studies and I did not see this type of analysis in the article. To me this makes the article empty. You are better on the public health issue what do you think.

    I agree, the article falls short.

    • #8
  9. WI Con Member
    WI Con
    @WICon

    The tourism bureaus of those states need to get on that (figuratively speaking of course).

    • #9
  10. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Gitter (View Comment):

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    What I would say is that D.C. skipped past what I regard as the elephant in that room, that being: How is it possible that all of these highly religious Southern States have these high rates of VD, while many less religious states on the other side of the spectrum have the least?

    Like with a lot of bad outcomes in these red states that liberals like to point at, higher proportions of blacks. Why that happens to be the case can be debated, but it is the case nonetheless. That’s the real elephant in the room.

    Yeah… the article covered abstinence only education policies and its a hit and miss. Some states are on the least, some on the most. W. VA surprised me. I was also surprised FL wasn’t on the “most” list, but I suppose the rest of the population balances out The Villages…

    • #10
  11. Majestyk Contributor
    Majestyk
    @Majestyk

    Gitter (View Comment):

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    What I would say is that D.C. skipped past what I regard as the elephant in that room, that being: How is it possible that all of these highly religious Southern States have these high rates of VD, while many less religious states on the other side of the spectrum have the least?

    Like with a lot of bad outcomes in these red states that liberals like to point at, higher proportions of blacks. Why that happens to be the case can be debated, but it is the case nonetheless. That’s the real elephant in the room.

    OK  – you caught me.  I may have already known that, but the outlier of Alaska gives me pause.

    I know what the statistics are WRT number of partners/age of first experience in different communities, but good luck making that case to people.  You get close to the fuel rods at the core of the reactor with those sorts of thoughts.

    • #11
  12. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    Majestyk (View Comment):

    Gitter (View Comment):

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    What I would say is that D.C. skipped past what I regard as the elephant in that room, that being: How is it possible that all of these highly religious Southern States have these high rates of VD, while many less religious states on the other side of the spectrum have the least?

    Like with a lot of bad outcomes in these red states that liberals like to point at, higher proportions of blacks. Why that happens to be the case can be debated, but it is the case nonetheless. That’s the real elephant in the room.

    OK – you caught me. I may have already known that, but the outlier of Alaska gives me pause.

    I know what the statistics are WRT number of partners/age of first experience in different communities, but good luck making that case to people. You get close to the fuel rods at the core of the reactor with those sorts of thoughts.

    Well, times they are a-changin’. I dunno about numbers of sex partners for Millennials–but surely, the age of first experience is going up!

    • #12
  13. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    OK – you caught me. I may have already known that, but the outlier of Alaska gives me pause.

    Going by the comments on the article, you may need to check your assumptions. Cultural differences might play a bigger role in Alaska than you might think, and it might not be abstinence only education…

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/09/rape-culture-in-the-alaskan-wilderness/379976/

    • #13
  14. Paul A. Rahe Contributor
    Paul A. Rahe
    @PaulARahe

    Stina (View Comment):

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    OK – you caught me. I may have already known that, but the outlier of Alaska gives me pause.

    Going by the comments on the article, you may need to check your assumptions. Cultural differences might play a bigger role in Alaska than you might think, and it might not be abstinence only education…

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/09/rape-culture-in-the-alaskan-wilderness/379976/

    A friend who lives there tells me that venereal disease is exceedingly common in the villages of the native Alaskans. Alas.

    Some similar pattern may be in play in New Mexico.

    • #14
  15. Charles Mark Member
    Charles Mark
    @CharlesMark

    Funny how no-one in soaps/movies ever seems to contract a venereal disease.

    • #15
  16. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Stina (View Comment):
    I was also surprised FL wasn’t on the “most” list, but I suppose the rest of the population balances out The Villages…

    Wonderful!  And true – The Villages has quite the scene.

    At least, so I’ve been told…

    • #16
  17. Paul A. Rahe Contributor
    Paul A. Rahe
    @PaulARahe

    Here’s another consideration:  Untreatable Gonorrhea Is Rapidly Spreading. Here’s What You Need to Know.

    • #17
  18. Paul A. Rahe Contributor
    Paul A. Rahe
    @PaulARahe

    Charles Mark (View Comment):
    Funny how no-one in soaps/movies ever seems to contract a venereal disease.

    One exception: The Last Days of Disco.

    • #18
  19. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Paul A. Rahe: To wit, the following states in rank order are the places where venereal disease is most likely to be found: . . .  South Carolina . . .

    To think being faithful to my wife all these years had a side benefit . . .

    • #19
  20. Mike H Coolidge
    Mike H
    @MikeH

    Majestyk (View Comment):
    How is it possible that all of these highly religious Southern States have these high rates of VD, while many less religious states on the other side of the spectrum have the least?

    Easy, because most metrics are just a proxy for poverty vs. wealth. (Or more fundamental, likely differences in IQ)

    • #20
  21. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    Why doesn’t the CDC and the medical community promote the one 100% effective method of preventing STDs (and unwanted pregnancies): chastity. Is it out of self-interest? Wouldn’t be prudent (for their bottom line)? Why?

    At my most cynical I think it’s another way lefties intentionally keep the black man down.

    • #21
  22. Mike H Coolidge
    Mike H
    @MikeH

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Why doesn’t the CDC and the medical community promote the one 100% effective method of preventing STDs (and unwanted pregnancies): chastity. Is it out of self-interest? Wouldn’t be prudent (for their bottom line)? Why?

    Promoting chastity essentially is promoting will power. I’m not saying that it’s not worth promoting, but I’d imagine the results would be much more disappointing.

     

    • #22
  23. Von Snrub Member
    Von Snrub
    @VonSnrub

    These are elephant in the room stats. If anyone comes to any other conclusion than race/culture being the culprit they’re choosing to be wrong.

    The list could be reworked as whitest states vs non-white states, with New Jersey as the outlier. However, New Jersey’s white population is high SEC so they can skew the statistics against their black population.

    If a child in this world reaches the age of 16 and is unaware of condoms, yet free to engage in risky sexual activity no amount of “education” will deter their poor judgement.

    From the years of studies on this particular topic it doesn’t appear that state funded education does !#$3. What works is intact families and safe communities.

    • #23
  24. Sisyphus Member
    Sisyphus
    @Sisyphus

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Why doesn’t the CDC and the medical community promote the one 100% effective method of preventing STDs (and unwanted pregnancies): chastity. Is it out of self-interest? Wouldn’t be prudent (for their bottom line)? Why?

    At my most cynical I think it’s another way lefties intentionally keep the black man down.

    If politicians started promoting chastity, who would receive those massive donations from Planned Parenthood?

    • #24
  25. Nick H Coolidge
    Nick H
    @NickH

    I don’t know about the other states on the second list, but one possible reason Wyoming is there is the low population density. Specifically the low number of women as compared to men. They say that in Wyoming there’s a beautiful woman behind every tree.  (Hint: a lot of the state looks like this:

    )

    This is not to say that there aren’t attractive women in Wyoming. There are many. Single, attractive women on the other hand, are less common.

    • #25
  26. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Nick H (View Comment):
    I don’t know about the other states on the second list, but one possible reason Wyoming is there is the low population density. Specifically the low number of women as compared to men. They say that in Wyoming there’s a beautiful woman behind every tree. (Hint: a lot of the state looks like this:

    )

    LOL that’s hilarious.

    If my daughter has trouble finding a husband, I’ll recommend WY to her… in 20 years…

    • #26
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