Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Jon Gabriel & Liz Wheeler on NFL Jaguars’ Apology for Kneeling

 

Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel appeared on “Tipping Point with Liz Wheeler” to discuss the Jacksonville Jaguars apologizing for kneeling at an NFL game in London.

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There are 6 comments.

  1. Gary Robbins Reagan

    Some good news. According to Peter King of Sports Illustrated and the Monday Morning Quarterback (MMQB),

    “In 14 games played Thursday and Sunday, 11 uniformed players either sat or kneeled during the national anthem as a measure of protest over the U.S. criminal-justice system, community-police relations, and the plight of minorities in this country. Eight of those 11 active players were Seahawks.”

    This protest has basically run its course.

    • #1
    • October 23, 2017, at 3:04 PM PDT
    • Like
  2. blood thirsty neocon Inactive

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):
    Some good news. According to Peter King of Sports Illustrated and the Monday Morning Quarterback (MMQB),

    “In 14 games played Thursday and Sunday, 11 uniformed players either sat or kneeled during the national anthem as a measure of protest over the U.S. criminal-justice system, community-police relations, and the plight of minorities in this country. Eight of those 11 active players were Seahawks.”

    This protest has basically run its course.

    Hmmm…I wonder what could have brought that about…

    • #2
    • October 23, 2017, at 3:22 PM PDT
    • Like
  3. George Townsend Inactive

    Terrific segment, Jon!

    • #3
    • October 23, 2017, at 3:55 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  4. Kozak Member
    Kozak Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Uh, @exjon Moore is correct. It’s a violation of US code to kneel during the National Anthem.

    Italics added.

    36 U.S. Code § 301 – National anthem

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    (a)Designation.—
    The composition consisting of the words and music known as the Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem.

    (b)Conduct During Playing.—During a rendition of the national anthem—
    (1) when the flag is displayed—
    (A)
    individuals in uniform should give the military salute at the first note of the anthem and maintain that position until the last note;

    (B)
    members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute in the manner provided for individuals in uniform; and

    (C)
    all other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, and men not in uniform, if applicable, should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart; and

    (2)
    when the flag is not displayed, all present should face toward the music and act in the same manner they would if the flag were displayed.

    (Pub. L. 105–225, Aug. 12, 1998, 112 Stat. 1263; Pub. L. 110–417, [div. A], title V, § 595, Oct. 14, 2008, 122 Stat. 4475.)

    • #4
    • October 23, 2017, at 4:02 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  5. Kozak Member
    Kozak Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):
    Some good news. According to Peter King of Sports Illustrated and the Monday Morning Quarterback (MMQB),

    “In 14 games played Thursday and Sunday, 11 uniformed players either sat or kneeled during the national anthem as a measure of protest over the U.S. criminal-justice system, community-police relations, and the plight of minorities in this country. Eight of those 11 active players were Seahawks.”

    This protest has basically run its course.

    Uh, no. All the Packers linked arms in “solidarity against injustice” blah blah. So did many others. So it ain’t over yet.

    • #5
    • October 23, 2017, at 4:04 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  6. JcTPatriot Inactive

    Thanks for the post, Jon. Very well done. ok, let’s check the news wires:

    According to the Associated Press, 22 players protested during Week 7’s NFL action–with two teams housing the majority of players demonstrating.

    On Sunday, the Seahawks and 49ers had the most protesters. Seattle defensive end Michael Bennett and seven Seahawks teammates did not stand before their game with the New York Giants. As a New York City police officer sang the anthem, Bennett was joined by defensive tackle Sheldon Richardson, defensive end Brandon Jackson, defensive end Marcus Smith, defensive tackle Jarran Reed, defensive end Frank Clark, and defensive end Quinton Jefferson. Defensive end Cliff Avril, scratched for the game, sat between Clark and Bennett.

    In San Francisco, about a half-dozen 49ers kneeled led by Eric Reid, Marquise Goodwin, rookie linebacker Reuben Foster, Eli Harold, Adrian Colbert, and K’waun Williams. All the Dallas Cowboys stood, but defensive tackle David Irving raised his fist after the anthem ended.

    In Cleveland, Titans wide receiver Rishard Matthews stayed inside the tunnel during the national anthem.

    Chargers left tackle Russell Okung stood with his right fist raised during the anthem before Los Angeles hosted the Denver Broncos.

    All the Dallas Cowboys stood , but defensive tackle David Irving raised his fist after the anthem ended. “I know that he was very deliberate during the anthem, and of course that’s the issue with me,” said Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, who had threatened to bench players who protested the anthem. “I’m very proud of the way they all handled themselves.”

    Just one player appeared to protest visibly during the early games Sunday, with Rams linebacker Robert Quinn raising his fist during the U.S. anthem, then bringing it down before “God Save The Queen” before playing Arizona in London.

    Most of the Indianapolis Colts locked arms before kickoff at home against the Jacksonville Jaguars.

    In Miami, Kenny Stills, Michael Thomas and Julius Thomas all stayed in the locker room during the anthem.

    Headline of the day! From CNBC: “Wall Street Is Befuddled Over Plunging NFL Ratings”

    • #6
    • October 23, 2017, at 4:12 PM PDT
    • 1 like