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Reasonable Gun Control: A Canadian Lives with It

 

As a Canadian I get to live in a country with so-called “common sense” gun control laws. I can share some of the experiences I have had and witnessed in my course of living in a country with these laws.

How common sense is it that, if you own a legal pistol of certain arbitrary calibers (anything greater than a .357), if you want to drive from your home with your gun in a bulletproof locked case to the gun range in order to use it, you must have a police escort. How is that common sense? Yet this is a regulation in Ontario.

I live in the city of Hamilton, where there has been a series of home invasions that have this summer led to the deaths of several home owners. My friend’s house was recently broken into. In this house his elderly father lives along with his 14-year-old sister. His father took one of my friend’s guns from his collection and shot the intruder. My friend’s father now faces multiple charges, including aggravated assault and possession of an unregistered firearm. See, his son had the license and even though they lived in the same house, the father didn’t have the same license. So, the father now faces 10 years in prison. The home invader who has multiple previous convictions will get two years less a day most likely.

Or how about the time a man in southern Ontario had a group of men armed with Molotov cocktails approach his house threatening to firebomb it? He fired three shots in the air to frighten them away. The cops arrived later and, of course, arrested him for firing his gun and charged him.

My understanding is that eventually, after years, he was let go. Of course, I believe he had to sell his home in order to pay his legal bills.

Then there is of course the High River gun grab. Where the federal police seized 600 guns that were safely locked up in an evacuated town. There was of course no one left to “steal” the often times locked up firearms, secured in legal gun cabinets. That didn’t prevent the police from busting into the houses, destroying private property. The cops likely had a forbidden copy of a now destroyed federal database of guns. How much private property was destroyed? $2.3 million worth it seems?

My own experience? I don’t own a gun and I have never fired one in my life. However, three months after buying my old house, a group of what one presumes crackheads. Kicked down the front door of my house. They smashed my cars headlights, they smashed my TV and smashed holes in my wall. They were screaming how they were going to kill everyone in the house. They only seemed to have left as they realized they had smashed into the wrong house.

Fortunately, they left before they smashed me or any of my roommates who had barricaded themselves in their rooms. But after the police response time of 10 minutes and their lackluster investigation (oh, by the way, they never caught the culprits). I have great envy for most Americans who live in places where they can reasonably protect themselves without fear of being arrested by the cops for protecting their life and home from being murdered or destroyed.

So the next time someone goes on about common sense gun control and reasonable law enforcement just point them to this post and tell them exactly how things go for gun owners in Canada. Because when they say they only want reasonable laws, they are lying.

Published in Guns
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There are 22 comments.

  1. Thatcher
    TG

    Thank you, TWW.

    • #1
    • October 5, 2017 at 4:20 am
    • 3 likes
  2. Member

    This was so enlightening! Could you tell me, Tory, was it like this under Harper? I thought he was so good.

    • #2
    • October 5, 2017 at 4:45 am
    • 1 like
  3. Member

    ToryWarWriter: n this house his elderly father lives along with his 14-year-old sister.

    I really, really, really don’t mean to thread-jack, but this sentence confused me.

    • #3
    • October 5, 2017 at 4:46 am
    • Like
  4. Member

    Wouldn’t it be nice if all who favour “common sense gun control” move to Canada or Cuba? I’m sure they would love the single payer healthcare also. Where is the strength of their convictions?

    • #4
    • October 5, 2017 at 4:47 am
    • 14 likes
  5. Member

    I took a class a few years ago that had students from Canada. One of them told me that due to a break-in that was similar to your experience, he got an attack dog. Then he started training them, and his business is growing rapidly. It seems Canadian’s want personal protection too, and the dog is still legal, thus the demand.

    • #5
    • October 5, 2017 at 4:59 am
    • 15 likes
  6. Member

    Thank you for this post. I live in rural (very rural) New Hampshire and know that a lot of my neighbors have guns. I listen to all the progressive bleating about guns and while I know deep inside that people should be allowed to own guns, I’ve never clearly been able to express why or to express why many gun laws are just plain wrong. You just did it for me – thank you.

    • #6
    • October 5, 2017 at 5:28 am
    • 8 likes
  7. Member

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    ToryWarWriter: n this house his elderly father lives along with his 14-year-old sister.

    I really, really, really don’t mean to thread-jack, but this sentence confused me.

    The guy lives in the house. His father also lives there. His 14-year-old sister, the father’s daughter, also lives there.

    • #7
    • October 5, 2017 at 5:30 am
    • 3 likes
  8. Thatcher

    When I get home tonight, I intend to reblog this on RushBabe49.com. OK?

    • #8
    • October 5, 2017 at 6:39 am
    • 4 likes
  9. Member
    ToryWarWriter Post author

    My friend is in his lates 30s. His father in the mid 60s. His sister is 13. Old dad, young wife. Now divorced.

    Harper was Federal PM. But police is Provincial. The bureaucracy is also very Liberal. So we can appoint good solid conservatives to posts, but they tend over time to become more sympathetic to the bureaucracies they work for than the politics.

    The RCMP is the federal Police, but in many jurisdictions it rents it self out to Provinces, such as Alberta. Its really complicated.

    Totally feel free to reblog it.

    • #9
    • October 5, 2017 at 7:29 am
    • 7 likes
  10. Member

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):
    My friend is in his lates 30s. His father in the mid 60s. His sister is 13. Old dad, young wife. Now divorced.

    Harper was Federal PM. But police is Provincial. The bureaucracy is also very Liberal. So we can appoint good solid conservatives to posts, but they tend over time to become more sympathetic to the bureaucracies they work for than the politics.

    The RCMP is the federal Police, but in many jurisdictions it rents it self out to Provinces, such as Alberta. Its really complicated.

    Totally feel free to reblog it.

    Thank you for answering my question, Tory. I must say that I am still confused. As you say, it sounds very complicated. I’ve heard Mark Steyn over the years talk about the non-freedom to speak and write that seems to be extant there. I feel bad for you.

    Incidentally, I may also put this on my blog. Thanks!

    • #10
    • October 5, 2017 at 7:38 am
    • 2 likes
  11. Member
    ToryWarWriter Post author

    Put your questions here, and I will answer them all in detail, when I get home from work tonight.

    • #11
    • October 5, 2017 at 7:55 am
    • 2 likes
  12. Member

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):
    Put your questions here, and I will answer them all in detail, when I get home from work tonight.

    Thanks. I have three that occur to me:

    1. Are your provinces like our states, in that some have high tax rates, etc, while some have no state taxes.
    2. Is freedom to speak and to write as impaired as I get the feeling they are from Mark Steyn?
    3. Is Treaudeou (forgive the spelling) as bad as we all fear he is?

    Please forgive the ignorance? As you as can tell, my knowledge of Canada is pretty limited.

    • #12
    • October 5, 2017 at 8:54 am
    • 1 like
  13. Member

    ToryWarWriter: The cops likely had a forbidden copy of a now destroyed federal database of guns.

    If you believe that database was actually destroyed, I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

    • #13
    • October 5, 2017 at 10:39 am
    • 8 likes
  14. Member
    ToryWarWriter Post author

    @misthiocracy What? And here I thought they had a time machine!

    • #14
    • October 5, 2017 at 11:07 am
    • 3 likes
  15. Member

    Misthiocracy (View Comment):

    ToryWarWriter: The cops likely had a forbidden copy of a now destroyed federal database of guns.

    If you believe that database was actually destroyed, I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

    So if you have a forbidden gun you will be hurt. But if you have a forbidden database it’s all cool?

    • #15
    • October 5, 2017 at 2:36 pm
    • 2 likes
  16. Thatcher

    Now I have a major objection: mid-60’s isn’t elderly, you young whippersnapper! Elderly is somewhere much farther along the trail.

    (I know whereof I talk, I’m 70.)

    But congrats to your middle-aged father for hitting the target!

    • #16
    • October 5, 2017 at 2:58 pm
    • 6 likes
  17. Member
    ToryWarWriter Post author

    Sorry I couldnt answer your questions last night, Russia I suppose.

    • #17
    • October 6, 2017 at 3:40 am
    • Like
  18. Member

    Chuckles (View Comment):
    Now I have a major objection: mid-60’s isn’t elderly, you young whippersnapper! Elderly is somewhere much farther along the trail.

    (I know whereof I talk, I’m 70.)

    But congrats to your middle-aged father for hitting the target!

    That’s what confused me about that sentence – “elderly” father and “14-year-old sister” don’t normally go together (leaving exceptional cases like Tony Randall aside).

    • #18
    • October 6, 2017 at 4:44 am
    • 2 likes
  19. Member

    The interesting problem with Canadian gun control is there wasn’t so much a dramatic legislative change, but a gradual almost the frog being boiled change in the attitude of law enforcement and prosecutors. For instance the cases of home owners being charged for improper use or storage of a weapon in defense of their life or property. That is not a gun control problem, you are still allowed to use a firearm in self defense, it just depends which cop or prosecutor works your case.

    This is not say that the Canadian story shouldn’t be a cautionary tale. But the real danger is not in explicit and clear legislation but in the muddled and arbitrary nature of Canadian laws that allows law enforcement and prosecutors great leeway.

    • #19
    • October 6, 2017 at 6:48 am
    • 5 likes
  20. Thatcher

    Remember, and this applies to anyone in the world: When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

    I thank the Founding Fathers for the 2nd Amendment. I can, and will, protect myself and my family.

    Hey Tory guy, I’ll just say that you’ll need to get everyone in the family a .357. With hollow-points, it should be all you’ll ever need.

    • #20
    • October 6, 2017 at 8:42 am
    • 2 likes
  21. Thatcher

    Chuckles (View Comment):
    Now I have a major objection: mid-60’s isn’t elderly, you young whippersnapper! Elderly is somewhere much farther along the trail.

    (I know whereof I talk, I’m 70.)

    But congrats to your middle-aged father for hitting the target!

    I caught that too Chuckles and can well remember the day, many years ago, when I thought 40 was old!!

    • #21
    • October 6, 2017 at 12:30 pm
    • 1 like
  22. Member

    Misthiocracy (View Comment):

    ToryWarWriter: The cops likely had a forbidden copy of a now destroyed federal database of guns.

    If you believe that database was actually destroyed, I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

    This is why I would never register my guns.

    • #22
    • October 6, 2017 at 2:43 pm
    • 1 like