Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Three-Letter Word from LGBTQ

 

The title of this OP was a clue in my morning crossword puzzle. It made me angry. I can’t even escape the leftist propaganda with my morning coffee, Crunch cereal with almond milk, raisins, and bananas. I have to be reminded that this term (which now has many more letters nowadays) has become part of our everyday lexicon.

My reaction is not just about the term LGBTQ; it’s about everyone trying to normalize those lifestyles which once were considered out of the norm. Don’t get me wrong: I love the diversity of my crossword puzzle — What’s a port in Yemen? Name a Wall Street index? What’s a desert plant used to make tequila? Who was the screenwriter, James, who wrote “The African Queen”? (Tuesday’s puzzles are pretty easy.)

I get enough politically correct nonsense from everywhere else. Please leave my crossword puzzle alone.

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  1. Columbo Member

    Indeed! Just like sports fans who only want to hear about sports on ESPN.

    • #1
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:11 AM PDT
    • 14 likes
  2. Hoyacon Member

    Ten years ago it probably would have been “____ Paree.”

    • #2
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:15 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  3. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Columbo (View Comment):
    Indeed! Just like sports fans who only want to hear about sports on ESPN.

    OMG–nothing is sacred! Especially sports–we could spending hours talking about indoctrination there. Sigh.

    • #3
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:18 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  4. Front Seat Cat Member

    What paper was it in? My 81 year old mother-in-law has done a crossword puzzle weekly (might be daily) for most of her life – she has multiple language dictionaries and is very sharp, but I bet that would have stumped her !! GADS!!

    • #4
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:19 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  5. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Hoyacon (View Comment):
    Ten years ago it probably would have been “____ Paree.”

    Ah yes, Hoyacon, fond memories. So sad.

    • #5
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:19 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  6. Fred Cole Member

    Susan Quinn: My reaction is not just about the term LGBTQ; it’s about everyone trying to normalize those lifestyles which once were considered out of the norm.

    They were once considered outside the norm. Now they’re not. Standards and mores change over time. Some are for the better (like not burning gay people at the stake) and some are for the worse (the prevalence of facial tattoos).

    • #6
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:20 AM PDT
    • 7 likes
  7. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):
    What paper was it in? My 81 year old mother-in-law has done a crossword puzzle weekly (might be daily) for most of her life – she has multiple language dictionaries and is very sharp, but I bet that would have stumped her !! GADS!!

    It’s the only thing I read in the Orlando Sentinel, FSC–gah! If there’s any local news that Jerry thinks I might want to hear, he reads it to me. I don’t know if the WSJ would have something like this, but obviously they probably don’t have a puzzle-maker on staff. I’ll have to keep an eye out. Your poor mother-in-law . . .

    • #7
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:21 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  8. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Fred Cole (View Comment):
    They were once considered outside the norm. Now they’re not.

    When I say outside the norm, Fred, I’m saying they are a tiny part of the population. Not the same as saying “normal.” As a result, I think we spend a lot of time on them although they are outside the norm.

    • #8
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:24 AM PDT
    • 14 likes
  9. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White MaleJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Fred Cole (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: My reaction is not just about the term LGBTQ; it’s about everyone trying to normalize those lifestyles which once were considered out of the norm.

    They were once considered outside the norm. Now they’re not. Standards and mores change over time. Some are for the better (like not burning gay people at the stake) and some are for the worse (the prevalence of facial tattoos).

    As someone pointed out several years back, homosexuality has gone from “the love that dare not speak its name”, to “the love that won’t shut up”.

    • #9
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:25 AM PDT
    • 45 likes
  10. Mate De Inactive

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):
    What paper was it in? My 81 year old mother-in-law has done a crossword puzzle weekly (might be daily) for most of her life – she has multiple language dictionaries and is very sharp, but I bet that would have stumped her !! GADS!!

    That is a good point. Perhaps the demographic of those who still do crossword puzzles aren’t down with the new jargon.

    • #10
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:27 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  11. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Mate De (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):
    What paper was it in? My 81 year old mother-in-law has done a crossword puzzle weekly (might be daily) for most of her life – she has multiple language dictionaries and is very sharp, but I bet that would have stumped her !! GADS!!

    That is a good point. Perhaps the demographic of those who still do crossword puzzles aren’t down with the new jargon.

    I often wonder how Millenials would be able to complete them, Mate De; lots of the clues are oldies. But maybe some of them are fans of the good ol’ days. Or maybe just us more mature folks are doing them!

    • #11
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:28 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  12. MLH Inactive

    Fred Cole (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: My reaction is not just about the term LGBTQ; it’s about everyone trying to normalize those lifestyles which once were considered out of the norm.

    They were once considered outside the norm. Now they’re not. Standards and mores change over time. Some are for the better (like not burning gay people at the stake) and some are for the worse (the prevalence of facial tattoos).

    If they are so normal why do they have to advertise it so much?

    • #12
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:32 AM PDT
    • 20 likes
  13. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    The latest norm :

    At full throttle, the letters wind up something like LGBTQQIP2SAA – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender,

    • Two Q’s to cover both bases (queer and questioning);
    • I for Intersex, people with two sets of genitalia or various chromosomal differences;
    • P for Pansexual, people who refuse to be pinned down on the Kinsey scale;
    • 2S for Two-Spirit, a tradition in many First Nations that considers sexual minorities to have both male and female spirits;
    • A for Asexual, people who do not identify with any orientation; and
    • A for Allies, recognizing that the community thrives best with loving supporters, although they are not really part of the community itself.
    • #13
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:39 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  14. Mate De Inactive

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Fred Cole (View Comment):
    They were once considered outside the norm. Now they’re not.

    When I say outside the norm, Fred, I’m saying they are a tiny part of the population. Not the same as saying “normal.” As a result, I think we spend a lot of time on them although they are outside the norm.

    We know what you meant Susan. There was this scene in the movie Boiler Room where the alpha Wall Street brokers are taunting some gay dudes at another table and the brokers say ” You know what they should do? Take all you guys and put you on one big f ing island” to which the gay dude replies “You’re on it” Meaning the island of Manhattan.

    The reason why it seems everything is gay is because the vast majority live in coastal cities where much of the folks that create our media, movies, TV, etc…. live. So if you live in a place where it seems everyone one is gay, you lose sight of the fact that the percentage is pretty small, in comparison to the rest of the country.

    Which is why it would be nice for some of our media creators to live in smaller towns, or rural areas to get a better sense of the majority make up of the country.

    • #14
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:41 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  15. Addiction Is A Choice Member

    I was doing a crossword and the seven-letter clue was: “A type of ant.” I wrote “Pissant” and proceeded to finish the puzzle. YAY! The next day I learned that the correct answer was “Pismire” not “Pissant”…It screwed up my whole puzzle! On the plus side, I’ve never forgotten “Pismire.”

    • #15
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:42 AM PDT
    • 9 likes
  16. Fred Cole Member

    MLH (View Comment):
    If they are so normal why do they have to advertise it so much?

    Well, it’s hard to not advertise when something is tattooed on your face.

    • #16
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:46 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  17. Fred Cole Member

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    At full throttle, the letters wind up something like LGBTQQIP2SAA

    Right. But nobody uses that because, as branding goes, it’s kinda clunky.

    When “LGBTQQIP2SAA” shows up in your crossword, that will be … remarkable.

    • #17
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:47 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  18. Fred Cole Member

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    I often wonder how Millenials would be able to complete them, Mate De; lots of the clues are oldies. But maybe some of them are fans of the good ol’ days. Or maybe just us more mature folks are doing them!

    Well, yeah, but if you were doing a crossword from like 40 or 50 years ago, there’s probably a bunch of clues you’d have no shot at getting. Sure, “Russian Pacific seaport, 11 letters” isn’t going to change, but phrases and references change over time.

    I spent a good chunk of the 1990s and early 2000s learning a bunch of references from the ’60s and ’70s just so I could get the references. (I saw through Lawrence of Arabia so I could get a couple of references in one episode of “The Critic.”) But nobody makes those references anymore.

    • #18
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:50 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  19. Fred Cole Member

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):
    As someone pointed out several years back, homosexuality has gone from “the love that dare not speak its name”, to “the love that won’t shut up”.

    That’s because if you spoke its name you’d be burned at the stake for it.

    • #19
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:51 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  20. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White MaleJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Mate De (View Comment):
    The reason why it seems everything is gay is because the vast majority live in coastal cities where much of the folks that create our media, movies, TV, etc…. live. So if you live in a place where it seems everyone one is gay, you lose sight of the fact that the percentage is pretty small, in comparison to the rest of the country.

    Nope. It’s a pretty small percentage even in those places.

    Gallup did a survey of self-identified gays by metropolitan area a few years ago. In San Francisco, the percentage of gays is something like 6%. And that was the highest percentage anywhere in the country.

    And the variation across regions is not that high:

    Variation in the percentage who identify as LGBT across the largest metro areas is relatively narrow, with San Francisco’s percentage just 2.6 percentage points higher than the national average of 3.6%, and the lowest-ranked metro area — Birmingham, Alabama — one point below the national average.

    http://www.gallup.com/poll/182051/san-francisco-metro-area-ranks-highest-lgbt-percentage.aspx

    • #20
    • August 1, 2017, at 6:53 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  21. Mate De Inactive

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    Mate De (View Comment):
    The reason why it seems everything is gay is because the vast majority live in coastal cities where much of the folks that create our media, movies, TV, etc…. live. So if you live in a place where it seems everyone one is gay, you lose sight of the fact that the percentage is pretty small, in comparison to the rest of the country.

    Nope. It’s a pretty small percentage even in those places.

    Gallup did a survey of self-identified gays by metropolitan area a few years ago. In San Francisco, the percentage of gays is something like 6%. And that was the highest percentage anywhere in the country.

    I know what you mean but the perception is that it is higher. My sister had one gay couple in her neighborhood and she would refer to it as the “gayberhood” when they would have get togethers. Like, I’m hanging with some folks from the gayberhood. I said to her how does one couple make the entire neighborhood gay? There are hundreds of people who live there. So it is more a perception than actual numbers. I hope that makes sense.

    • #21
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:00 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  22. Bob Thompson Member

    Fred Cole (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: My reaction is not just about the term LGBTQ; it’s about everyone trying to normalize those lifestyles which once were considered out of the norm.

    They were once considered outside the norm. Now they’re not. Standards and mores change over time. Some are for the better (like not burning gay people at the stake) and some are for the worse (the prevalence of facial tattoos).

    Just because something is common does not make it normal.

    • #22
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:01 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
  23. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHillJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    “Pan Sexual.” If you believe, clap your hands?

    • #23
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:05 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  24. Columbo Member

    Fred Cole (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: My reaction is not just about the term LGBTQ; it’s about everyone trying to normalize those lifestyles which once were considered out of the norm.

    They were once considered outside the norm. Now they’re not. Standards and mores change over time. Some are for the better (like not burning gay people at the stake) and some are for the worse (the prevalence of facial tattoos).

    What about the ongoing standard of throwing “gay people” off the top of buildings by that religion of peace (sic) …

    http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/12/06/isis-throws-man-off-roof-for-being-gay-mob-pelts-corpse-with-rocks.html

    • #24
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:07 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  25. Fred Cole Member

    EJHill (View Comment):
    “Pan Sexual.” If you believe, clap your hands?

    From the Wikipedia:

    Pansexuality, or omnisexuality,[1] is the sexual, romantic or emotional attraction towards people regardless of their sex or gender identity.[2][3] Pansexual people may refer to themselves as gender-blind, asserting that gender and sex are not determining factors in their romantic or sexual attraction to others.[4][5][5]

    Pansexuality may be considered a sexual orientation in its own right or a branch of bisexuality, to indicate an alternative sexual identity.[3][6][7] Because pansexual people are open to relationships with people who do not identify as strictly men or women, and pansexuality therefore rejects the gender binary,[3][7] it is often considered a more inclusive term than bisexual.[8][9] To what extent the term bisexual is inclusive when compared with the term pansexual is debated within the LGBT community, especially the bisexual community.[9]

    • #25
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:08 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  26. Kozak Member
    KozakJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Un PC word that would fit the clue….

    F##…..

    • #26
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:08 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
  27. Kozak Member
    KozakJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    The latest norm :

    At full throttle, the letters wind up something like LGBTQQIP2SAA – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender,

    • Two Q’s to cover both bases (queer and questioning);
    • I for Intersex, people with two sets of genitalia or various chromosomal differences;
    • P for Pansexual, people who refuse to be pinned down on the Kinsey scale;
    • 2S for Two-Spirit, a tradition in many First Nations that considers sexual minorities to have both male and female spirits;
    • A for Asexual, people who do not identify with any orientation; and
    • A for Allies, recognizing that the community thrives best with loving supporters, although they are not really part of the community itself.

    Not nearly enough….

    “UK Facebook users can now choose from one of 71 gender options, including asexual, polygender and two-spirit person, following the feature’s successful integration in the US.”

    • #27
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:12 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  28. The Scarecrow Thatcher
    The ScarecrowJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    We have to remember that the constructor is not trying to force certain words in (except for themed answers of course). He fills in the grid, then tries to supply clues that describe what he ended up with. I got that one right away, but because it has been in the news so much recently. And it’s now a word, so I guess we just have to deal.

    The trend I’d rather kvetch about is the ever-growing convenient out for the constructor of using rappers’ names. I have NO idea, and apparently they could be anything – any random spelling. I always have to solve it with the crossing words, but there’s no way to be sure until the app plays the little music that announces my daily victory.

    All is fair game I guess, but rappers’ names might as well be random letters. (I know “DRE”.)

    • #28
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:12 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  29. Fred Cole Member

    Columbo (View Comment):
    What about the ongoing standard of throwing “gay people” off the top of buildings by that religion of peace (sic) …

    Why did you put “gay people” in quotes?

    • #29
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:15 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  30. Hang On Member
    Hang OnJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Fred Cole (View Comment):
    Sure, “Russian Pacific seaport, 11 letters” isn’t going to change, but phrases and references change over time.

    But seaports have changed names in the last century. Danzig-Gdansk. St. Petersburg-Petrograd-Leningrad-Petersburg. Constantanople-Istanbul. Bombay-Mumbai.

    • #30
    • August 1, 2017, at 7:16 AM PDT
    • 1 like

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