Mexican Government’s “Guide for the Mexican Migrant”

 

Published by Mexico’s foreign ministry (apparently in 2005). The version displayed below was captured from the sre.gob.mx website. “SRE” stands for Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores or the office of the Mexican Secretariat of Foreign Affairs which is the equivalent of the US Department of State. I can no longer find the guide on their website. The guide gives insight into the Mexican government’s attitude towards illegal immigration into the US. It begins with (page 1):

Dear fellow citizen:

This guide tries to provide you with some practical advice that may be useful to you in case you have made the difficult decision to seek new work opportunities outside of your own country. [emphasis added]

Then the guide proceeds to illustrate and advise on how to “cross the northern border without the necessary documentation” (page 1); safety measures for swimming the Rio Grande (pages 4-5); advice on choosing a smuggler (pages 8-11); how to deal with the US border patrol (pages 12-17); legal rights once in the US including “You are not obligated to disclose your immigration status when you are detained” (pages 18-23); how to avoid detection once in the US (pages 24-27); and a handy list of the Mexican consulates in U.S. Cities including their phone numbers (pages 29-30).

I have provided the entire guide with an English translation below each page. It is helpful if, as you read, you envision an equivalent document written by the Dept. of State, advising US citizens on illegal entry into Canada.

INTRODUCTION, PAGES 0 – 1

Dear fellow citizen:

This guide tries to provide you with some practical advice that may be useful to you in case you have made the difficult decision to seek new work opportunities outside of your own country.

The safe way to enter another country is by first obtaining your passport, which is issued by the Delegations of the Secretariat of Foreign Relations, and your visa, which you request at the Embassy or Consulate of the country to where you wish to travel.

However, we actually see many cases of Mexicans who try to cross the northern border without the necessary documentation, crossing high-risk zones that are very dangerous, especially in desert areas or rivers with strong and not always noticeable currents.

INTRODUCTION, PAGES 2 – 3

As you read this guide you can also learn some basic questions about legal consequences of your stay in the United States of America without appropriate immigration documents, as well as the rights you have in that country once you are there, independent of your immigration status.

Always keep in mind that there are mechanisms for you to enter the United States of America legally.

In any case, if you encounter problems or difficulties, remember that Mexico has 45 Consulates at its disposal in that country, whose contact information you also can find in this publication.

Identify your Consulate and go to it.

RISKS, PAGES 4 – 5

DANGERS OF CROSSING IN HIGH-RISK ZONES

Crossing the river can be very risky, especially if you cross alone and at night..

Thick clothing weighs you down when it’s wet and makes it hard to swim or float.

RISKS, PAGES 6 – 7

If you cross in the desert, try to travel when the heat is not so intense.

Highways and towns are very far apart, so that it could take you several days to find roads and you will not be able to carry food or water for that long. You could even get lost.

Salted water helps you retain body fluids. Although you get more thirsty, if you drink salted water the risk of dehydration is lessened.

Dehydration symptoms are:

? Little or no perspiration

? Dryness of eyes and mouth

? Headache

? Fatigue and exhaustion

? Difficulty in walking and reasoning

? Hallucinations and mirages

If you get lost follow utility poles, railroad tracks or furrows.

BE CAREFUL OF ALIEN SMUGGLERS, PAGES 8 – 09

BE CAREFUL OF “POLLEROS”, “COYOTES” OR “PATEROS” [Various names for alien smugglers)

They can deceive you by assuring you they’ll cross you [smuggle you across the border] at certain times over mountains or through deserts. This is not true! They can put your life in danger leading you through rivers, irrigation canals, desert areas, along railroad tracks or freeways. This has caused the death of hundreds of people.

If you decide to use the services of a “pollero”, “coyote” or “patero” to cross the border, consider the following precautions to take:

Don’t let him out of your sight; remember that he’s the only one that knows the terrain and therefore is the only one that can guide you safely.

Do not trust anyone who offers to cross you over to the “other side” and asks you to drive a vehicle or carry a package for him. Regularly those…

BE CAREFUL OF ALIEN SMUGGLERS, PAGES 10 – 11

…packages contain drugs or other prohibited substances. For that reason many people have ended up in jail.

If you transport other people you can be confused with an alien smuggler and be accused of alien smuggling yourself or even vehicle theft.

Don’t hand over your minor children to strangers that offer to cross them to the United States.

DO NOT USE FALSE DOCUMENTS, PAGES 12 – 13

DO NOT USE FALSE DOCUMENTS OR DOCUMENTS OF OTHER PEOPLE, NOR DECLARE A FALSE NATIONALITY

If you try to cross with documents that are false or that belong to someone else, keep the following in mind:

The use of documents that are false or that belong to someone else is a Federal crime in the United States, for which you can be criminally prosecuted and end up in jail; the same as if you give a false name or say you are a U.S. citizen when you are not.

Do not lie to U.S. border crossing or inspection booth agents.

IF YOU ARE DETAINED, PAGES 14 – 15

Do not resist arrest.

Do not assault or insult the officer.

Do not throw stones or other objects at the officers nor at the patrol cars, because this is considered a form of provocation.

If the officers feel they’ve been assaulted they will probably use force to detain you.

Raise your hands slowly for them to see you’re unarmed.

Do not carry or hold any objects that could be construed as weapons, such as: lanterns, screwdrivers, blades, knives or stones.

IF YOU ARE DETAINED, PAGE 16 / YOUR RIGHTS, PAGE 17

IF YOU ARE DETAINED

Don’t run or try to escape.

Don’t hide in dangerous places.

Don’t cross freeways.

It’s better for you to be detained for a few hours and be repatriated to Mexico than to get lost in the desert.

YOUR RIGHTS

IF YOU ARE ARRESTED, YOU HAVE RIGHTS!

Give your true name.

If you are a minor and are accompanied by an adult, tell the authorities so they do not separate you.

YOUR RIGHTS / YOUR RIGHTS, PAGES 18 – 19

Your rights are:

To know where you are.

To request to speak to the nearest Mexican Consulate representative in order to receive help.

To not make statements or sign documents, especially if they are in English, without the aid of a defense attorney or Mexican Government Consulate representative.

To receive medical attention if you are injured or in poor health.

To receive respectful treatment regardless of your immigration status.

To be transported safely.

To have water and food when you need it.

You are not obligated to disclose your immigration status when you are detained.

YOUR RIGHTS, PAGES 20 – 21

To not be hit or insulted.

To not be held incommunicado.

In case they take away your personal effects, request a voucher in order to claim them when you are released.

If there is any violation of these rights, it’s important for you to inform your attorney or Mexican Consulate representative that visits you or even the nearest Delegation of the Secretariat of Foreign Relations within Mexico.

If you wish more information and you live in Texas or in Ciudad AcuÒa, Coahuila, tune in to “The Powerful Station” at AM 1570.

IF YOU ARE ARRESTED / DETAINED, PAGES 22 – 23

IF YOU ARE ARRESTED / DETAINED

If you have already been sentenced for some crime or you are in jail facing criminal prosecution, you have the following rights:

To not be discriminated against by the police, the courts or prison authorities.

To receive visits from consular officials and family members.

To receive appropriate legal counsel without conditions or obstructions.

If you being criminally prosecuted and have not yet been sentenced, ask your attorney or consular representative what the “Plea Agreement” consists of.

Do not plead guilty without first consulting your attorney about the possibilities of winning your case if you go to trial.

It’s important they you know the laws of the American state where you live and work, since each state’s laws are different. Bear in mind the following information:

If you drink don’t drive, since if you do not have papers you can be detained and deported [a bit of INFOMUNDO editorializing here: no word about maiming or killing yourself or others as a drunk driver!].

If a legal resident is cited more than two times for drunk driving, he can be deported.

Do not drive without a driver’s license.

Observe traffic signs and signals and use your seatbelt.

Do not drive without auto insurance nor drive an unknown vehicle.

[THINGS TO] AVOID, PAGES 24 – 25

Do not pick up strangers.

If you commit some traffic violation and are detained by the police, place your hands on the steering wheel and do not get out of the car until the officer requests you to do so.

Avoid calling attention to yourself, at least while you are arranging your residence papers to live in the United States.

The best formula is not to alter your routine of going between work and home.

Avoid noisy parties because the neighbors can get upset and call the police, and you could be arrested.

Avoid fighting.

If you go to a bar or night club and a fight starts, leave immediately, since in the confusion you could be arrested even if you did not do anything wrong.

Avoid family or domestic violence. As in Mexico, it is a crime in the United States.

[THINGS TO] AVOID, PAGES 26 – 27

Domestic violence does not consist solely of hitting others but also can be threats, shouting or mistreatment.

If you are accused of domestic violence against your children, your mate or someone else who lives with toy, you could go to jail. In addition, Child Protective Services authorities could take away your children.

Do not carry firearms, bladed weapons or other dangerous objects.

Keep in mind that many Mexicans have died or are in prison because of these things.

If the police enter your house or apartment, do not resist, but ask to see a search warrant. It’s better to cooperate with them and ask to speak to the nearest Mexican Consulate.

CONSULATES, PAGES 28 – 29

The Secretariat of Foreign Relations has 45 consular representatives within the U.S and on its southern border, which are designed to help you. Remember: if you have been detained or are serving a sentence, you have the right to speak with the nearest Mexican Consulate. Always carry your “Guide to Consular Protection” with you at all times.

Get Near to the Consulate…

Embrace Mexico.

It’s your home, fellow countryman!

– Secretariat of Foreign Relations

– General Administration of Protection and Consular Matters.

CONSULATES OF MEXICO IN THE UNITED STATES, PAGE 30 (left side above)

List of U.S. Cities and phone numbers.

STATES – [MEXICAN] STATE GOVERNMENT OFFICES – DIRECTORY OF OFFICES GIVING ATTENTION TO MIGRANTS IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, PAGES 31 (right side previous page), 32-33, 34 (page below)

List of Mexican cities and phone numbers.

BOX ON LAST PAGE:

This consular protection guide is not promoting the crossing [of the border] of Mexicans without legal documentation required by the government of the United States; its objective is to make known the risks implied and to inform about the rights of migrants regardless of their legal residence.

Notes

Images: https://albertozambrano.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/guc3ada-del-inmigrante-ilegal-mexicano.pdf

English translation: http://www.theamericanresistance.com/ref/brochure_translated_guia_del_migrante_mexico.html

Original URLs for document:

  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page1.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page2.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page3.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page4.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page5.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page6.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page7.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page8.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page9.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page10.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page11.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page12.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page13.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page14.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page15.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page16.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page17.htm
  • http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page18.htm

There are 41 comments.

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  1. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Good grief! I hope this goes viral.

    • #1
  2. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    I think it is important old news. It was suppressed by the mainstream at the time in 2005, but provides an important context for present discussions with Mexico. Help me get it to main page.

    • #2
  3. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    RightAngles (View Comment):
    Good grief! I hope this goes viral.

    wish I was surprised that this isn’t more well-known, but I’m not.  I read articles when Mexico first started publishing these guides, but even right-wing media stopped talking about it almost immediately.

    Just like I wish I was surprised that more people don’t know about the racist provisions in Mexico’s constitution.

    • #3
  4. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Misthiocracy (View Comment):

    RightAngles (View Comment):
    Good grief! I hope this goes viral.

    I wish I was surprised that this isn’t more well-known, but I’m not. I read articles when Mexico first started publishing these guides, but even right-wing media stopped talking about it almost immediately.

    Just like I wish I was surprised that more people don’t know about the racist provisions in Mexico’s constitution.

    As far back as the early 90s, Rush Limbaugh was reading aloud from Mexico’s strict immigration laws, so I’ve known that for years. I wish it were more widely discussed. But I had no idea of this guide that Wiley has posted. It’s really unbelievable. I hope I can assume Trump knows about it.

    • #4
  5. Richard Hanchett Member
    Richard Hanchett
    @iDad

    I am very concerned about how Mexico will react to this post.

    • #5
  6. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    iDad (View Comment):
    I am very concerned about how Mexico will react to this post.

    Should I look for the nearest Ecuadorian embassy?

    • #6
  7. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    These pamphlets are common knowledge in Arizona. Border crossers without the proper paperwork that are caught within 150 miles of the border can be detained and immediately deported without trial, and I suspect that makes up the vast majority of deportations. Tucson is about 68 miles from the border.

    There are secondary border checkpoints about 23 to 30 miles from the border on the Interstate as well as on backroads in Arizona. The one on I-19 is fairly large, and everyone must stop long enough to allow the drug dogs to walk past your vehicle. All vehicles are photographed at every border check point that I have been through. I have seen one car pulled out of the line and directed to a parking area for a more comprehensive search. US citizen or not, all vehicles must stop at these checkpoints.

    The description of how to behave and interact with the police should undergo an edit for some of our own citizens in Chicago, Baltimore, and a few other American cities that I can think of.

    • #7
  8. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    The substitution game, move up one country: Mexico>US and US>Canada:

    US Department of State “Guide for the American Migrant”

    However, we actually see many cases of Americans who try to cross the northern border without the necessary documentation, crossing high-risk zones that are very dangerous, especially in snowy forest areas or rivers with strong and not always noticeable currents.

    INTRODUCTION, PAGES 2 – 3

    As you read this guide you can also learn some basic questions about legal consequences of your stay in Canada without appropriate immigration documents, as well as the rights you have in that country once you are there, independent of your immigration status.

    In any case, if you encounter problems or difficulties, remember that the US has 45 Consulates at its disposal in that country, whose contact information you also can find in this publication.

    Identify your Consulate and go to it.

    • #8
  9. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    The substitution game, move up one country: Mexico>US and US>Canada:

    US Department of State “Guide for the American Migrant”

    IF YOU ARE DETAINED

    Don’t run or try to escape.

    Don’t hide in dangerous places.

    Don’t cross freeways.

    It’s better for you to be detained for a few hours and be repatriated to the US than to get lost in the snowy lake areas.

    YOUR RIGHTS / YOUR RIGHTS, PAGES 18 – 19 Your rights are:

    To know where you are.

    To request to speak to the nearest US Consulate representative in order to receive help.

    To not make statements or sign documents, especially if they are in French, without the aid of a defense attorney or US Government Consulate representative.

    …You are not obligated to disclose your immigration status when you are detained.

    • #9
  10. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    I’d like to copy and paste this over to RushBabe49.com.  Maybe help it go more viral.

    • #10
  11. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):
    I’d like to copy and paste this over to RushBabe49.com. Maybe help it go more viral.

    Please do.

    • #11
  12. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):
    I’d like to copy and paste this over to RushBabe49.com. Maybe help it go more viral.

    @max, The OP is now on the “Recommended Feed” and it would be nice if public links could be given to friends and shared by others (see above) even if it is not on the Main Feed page. That way, even if it never makes it to the main feed, the OP can be shared by the author and members. Just an idea.

    • #12
  13. DocJay Member
    DocJay
    @DocJay

    I think there will be a new brochure soon.

    • #13
  14. Roberto Member
    Roberto
    @Roberto

    Some stories from back when this first emerged:

    New York Times

    Mexico’s Foreign Ministry, however, said its intent in publishing the “Guide for the Mexican Migrant” was to warn migrants of the dangers they might face if they choose to slip illegally into the United States…Mr. Gutiérrez said. “The Mexican government obviously has an obligation to take all actions possible in order to avoid the loss of life.”

    He added, “It is a natural and fair response to consider this as an attempt to promote undocumented immigration, but that is absolutely not the intent of the Mexican government.”

    Los Angeles Times

    The Mexican government has produced similar booklets before. But officials said they consider this edition, which is being distributed at government offices and inside magazines across Mexico, to be especially important given the rising number of border deaths. About 400 immigrants died along the border in 2003 — a 10% increase from 2002…Although the booklet includes statements discouraging people from crossing the border illegally, much of the publication is focused on aiding those who ignore that advice and try to enter the United States. The booklets are also available online and at Mexican consulates in the U.S.

    • #14
  15. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Wasn’t the Mexican government and media terribly concerned that this document would irritate/humiliate their friend and ally and neighbor to the north?

     

    • #15
  16. Kozak Member
    Kozak
    @Kozak

    Wait, but we were assured several times yesterday that Mexico has been a wonderful neighbor.

    • #16
  17. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    Wiley (View Comment):
    You are not obligated to disclose your immigration status when you are detained.

    Arguable.

    Under Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms (a terrible, awful, no-good document which, since it’s actually a statute of Westminster, has never been voted on by any Canadian legislature), you are only protected from self-incrimination if you have been charged with a crime.

    There’s still Common Law protection for the right to remain silent, but it’s not absolute.

    Different sites online say different things about when you have to identify yourself. It’s not entirely clear.

    • #17
  18. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    The Sonoran Desert is brutal. Although it contains more vegetation than the Mojave Desert the terrain is rugged and far from flat. In the winter temperatures drop into  20’s at night. In the summer day after day in the 100’s is common. Coyotes that take people across the border will tell crossers to walk north, but they lie about the distances they have to walk. It is not only migrants that lose their life in the desert, tourists and residents of Arizona do as well. You need to consume about a gallon of water for every hour you are out in the sun.

    My house is at 3300 feet above sea level, about 25 miles north of Tucson. The highest temp last summer at the house was 112. Each day that the temps remain in the high 90’s and the triple digits lowers your recovery time from the heat. On that day about 4 or 5 people lost their lives in the Tucson area. One was a tourist that went out for a walk, not a hike. The others were hikers. Stepping out on the patio is like stepping into a furnace. It does not take very long before you can be in serious trouble.

    The graph shows the number of unidentified remains of border crossers that have been recovered and delivered to the Pima County Coroners Office, the ones that have been found that is.

     

    • #18
  19. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    Sure seems like they are identifying a wall that needs mending…

     

     

    • #19
  20. Douglas Member
    Douglas
    @Douglas

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    Wasn’t the Mexican government and media terribly concerned that this document would irritate/humiliate their friend and ally and neighbor to the north?

    Why would they be afraid, when American media are largely onboard with their project to Make The Southwest Aztlan Again?

    Mexico’s long range goals are pretty clear here. They mean the American Southwest to be their Kosovo: as Albania flooded that area with Albanians to take it without firing a shot, Mexico intends to populate the area with Mexicans until they own it.

    This pamphlet made the rounds during Dubya’s amnesty. I think that may have been the beginning of the end of Karl Rove’s permanent GOP. That’s why we sent GOP fundraisers stuff like this:

    • #20
  21. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    Other curious illustrations.

    Mexican superhero crossing the Rio Grande:

    And the gratuitous super babe:

    And the ending hero of our story, the protector of rights, the Consulate bureaucrat.

    • #21
  22. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    It is not possible for me to despise the media and politicians of both parties more for keeping Americans ignorant and letting our neighbors do this to us for so long. Not. possible.

    • #22
  23. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Wiley (View Comment):
    Other curious illustrations.

    And the gratuitous super babe:

    And the ending hero of our story, the protector of rights, the Consulate bureaucrat.

    Haha! It’s Sabado Gigante !

    • #23
  24. OldDan Rhody Member
    OldDan Rhody
    @OldDanRhody

    I don’t read this pamphlet as actually encouraging Mexican people to enter our country illegally, but rather as the Mexican national government cautioning it’s citizens about some of the risks they’re contemplating – a legitimate concern.  I’m all for enforcing our immigration laws, for deporting illegal immigrants, and for our government pressuring the Mexican government to take steps to stem the flow of illegal emigration; but this pamphlet seems to me to be more about keeping people alive.

    And, is that work-appropriate dress for the gratuitous super-babe?

    • #24
  25. DocJay Member
    DocJay
    @DocJay

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    Wiley (View Comment):
    Other curious illustrations.

    And the gratuitous super babe:

    And the ending hero of our story, the protector of rights, the Consulate bureaucrat.

    Haha! It’s Sabado Gigante !

    Crossing Las Montagnes es muy peligrosa.

    • #25
  26. Matt White Member
    Matt White
    @

    Did anyone else get the impression the drug smugglers are meant to look like Americans?

    • #26
  27. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    Roberto kindly provided links to MSM reports. So how did they portray the guide? Accurately as journalists? Or untruthfully as partisans? Let’s look at the NYT.

    Roberto (View Comment)New York Times

    Entitled “A Mexican Manual for Illegal Migrants Upsets Some in U.S.” the report portrays two groups with two views:

    1. The “Officials” who say it is to “reduce the loss of life.”
    2. The “upset” who are portrayed by “groups favoring stricter immigration controls” and a Republican representative. They say the “pamphlet amounted to a how-to manual for illegal immigrants.”

    I find the article a report on what these groups think about the guide instead of an informational report about the guide. And given the readership of the NYT, the words critical of the guide were given to those the readers will not trust, who we are told are upset, and thus perhaps emotional and irrational.

    There are small bits of information hidden between the opinions, such as, learning that “About 1.5 million copies of the guide were printed and distributed throughout the country in December” 2005 alone.

    It was a very slanted framing of the information by partisans.

     

     

    • #27
  28. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    The second article.

    Roberto (View Comment): Los Angeles Times

    Entitled “Mexico’s Border-Crossing Tips Anger Some in U.S.” it dials up the instability of the critics from upset to angry. Curious that the similar toned articles were written within 2 days of each other. The groups here are:

    1. The officials (both Mexican and US) see it as educating for safety purposes.
    2. The “angry” who again are portrayed as “anti-immigrant groups” (even quoting the the same group, but a different quote than the NYT).

    The articles are different but very similar, giving the impression of coordination or else sharing the same instruction provided to the authors.

    Biased and unworthy journalism. Written back in 2005. How long have we been mislead by a colluding media? Clearly it started before Obama.

    • #28
  29. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    Matt White (View Comment):
    Did anyone else get the impression the drug smugglers are meant to look like Americans?

    You mean this guy:

    • #29
  30. Wiley Member
    Wiley
    @Wiley

    As for the theory this document was produced for the purpose of migrant safety (that was the official story in the MSM)… then why are these sections there?:

    8 pages on Legal Rights in the the US (pages 16 to 23)

    4 pages on How to not get in trouble while residing in the US (pages 24-27)

    7 pages on Legal & Government help to Migrants (pages 28-34)

    That’s more than half the document.

    • #30

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