Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Thoughts on Thinking: A Personal Odyssey

 

brainYears ago, I never tired of asking anyone who would sit still long enough some variation on the following question: Suppose you had to choose between having a strong and alert mind but with severe physical limitations (e.g., wheelchair-bound), or a perfectly healthy body and yet be as dumb as a bag of nails. Which would you choose? There was no right or wrong answer as far as I was concerned, though my own preference was for mental acuity. I simply wanted to hear the preferences and thoughts of people I found interesting.

That particular thought exercise loomed large in the mind when I sat down with my neurologist recently, having undergone a series of tests (cognitive, brain EEG, brain MRI, etc.) in the preceding weeks to determine, A) whether or not the mental fog I was occasionally experiencing was real, and B) whether there was a physical cause. “Mr. Carter, you had a stroke,” the doctor said as matter of factly as if he were announcing the Dow Jones daily closing numbers. Well, that was bracing.

It wasn’t recent, he added, though I had already figured as much. Reviewing my personal history, the doctor determined that the stroke likely occurred during an extremely stressful and traumatic event a few years back that, at the time, had me quite literally immobilized, unable to speak, with what seemed like a ribbon of agonizing pain shooting across the top of my head. Yes, I know I should have gotten myself checked out at the time, but personal circumstances made it impossible. At least now I know what happened.

The doctor went on to inform me that having had one stroke, albeit a relatively minor one, the odds of my having another stroke automatically increase tenfold. As if that wasn’t enough good tidings for one day, Dr. Happy News then asked, “Do you have high cholesterol?” Well, yes, as it happens, my primary doctor had informed me about a month earlier that my cholesterol is “abnormally high.” “Are you on medication for this?” “I am now,” I answered, and added that I’m slated to have my cholesterol tested again in a few weeks. “I want to see those test results,” the doctor directed, to which I enthusiastically agreed.

“So this explains why my memory dulls and why writing becomes more laborious at times,” I said. “Not really,” he answered, explaining that the stroke actually occurred in the part of my brain that controls balance. So not only do I still retain the powers of a first-rate smart ass, but I’ll be fun to watch! The doctor said that the cognitive slippage, while real, is in fact related to a case of mild depression.

Depression? The news shouldn’t have come as a shock given the personal events that resulted in the stroke, followed rather quickly by the deaths of my step mother and my father, which events were then followed by a radical change in lifestyle which, while wonderful, have entailed some adjustments. As I say, a diagnosis of depression shouldn’t have been surprising but, like the news of a stroke, it came as a kick to the spirits. The consensus, however, is that this is entirely treatable without resorting to any medication, which in turn has set me on a course of introspection and learning, which has also stirred in me a great deal of interest in how other people deal with similar issues. I have some questions for you, but first a little background.

I remembered taking a rather lengthy personality test many years ago which revealed that I am what’s known as an, “INTJ” (Introverted, Intuitive, Thinking, Judging) personality type which comprises roughly two percent of the population. The description of someone who is essentially propelled by a constant thirst for knowledge, who lives in their own mind, requires a great deal of solitude both to recharge (being naturally introverted, social gatherings, while enjoyable for awhile, can drain every ounce of energy) and to synthesize the results of their studies and theories into a coherent worldview, fits me like a glove.

But what sorts of things, other than normal calamities like death in the family, can send this personality type into a bit of depression? Lo, after more research, I find:

A Re-Cap Of What Causes An INTJ Stress:

  • Being in an environment that doesn’t appreciate their skills or vision.
  • Not enough time alone. Too much socializing.
  • Too much noise or sensory input.
  • Working with those they see as lazy, ignorant, or incompetent.
  • Having to focus on too many details at once.
  • Being in unfamiliar environments.
  • Having their plans disrupted.
  • Having to focus entirely on the here-and-now.
  • Not being able to envision the future or see a clear direction in their lives.

To varying degrees, all nine of the items above apply in my case (a great deal of it from my work). And while I won’t dwell on the particulars in this space, I’m pleased to report that I have a supportive wife who listens and is willing to help me find ways to alleviate those stressors that are not work related and who understands when I must draw boundaries. Meanwhile, I have to suspect that a great many of the good people here on Ricochet are of a similarly disposed personality type, yes? How do you handle the above stressors and distractions?

I find, for example, that processing, studying, and applying information takes on a sort of “visual,” or “impressionistic,” thinking rather than “thinking in words.” As Dr. A.J. Drenth observed:

Although INTJs are classified as Thinking types, their dominant function is Intuition, or more specifically, Introverted Intuition (Ni). In seeing the world through Ni lenses, their typical mode of operation is well described as impressionistic. Rather than noticing or concerning themselves with the details of the world around them, their existence is more cerebral or dreamlike. This can lead them to feel estranged from their physical environs, not to mention their own bodies.

Yes, well, while I haven’t done any out of body traveling lately, I can attest to many a night while leading an almost monastic existence on the road that I would become so totally engrossed in research and writing that I would completely forget to eat dinner. Even now, despite the fact that I no longer live in a truck, the reality of stopping the work of the mind in order to feed the body can be irksome. Sometimes, biology simply gets in the way.

And when I can finally give my noggin free rein, the business of reading and writing requires, for me at least, a quiet area. I marveled once when my wife was able to have a perfectly coherent telephone conversation while the television boomed right in front of her even as her mother carried on yet another phone conversation not more than five feet away. So here were three different conversations, two of them occurring in real time, and neither my wife nor my mother-in-law were the least bit distracted by the other two conversations happening all around them. I would have Simply. Gone. Nuts. Now, is this a consequence of processing information visually rather than linguistically? Or is it simply my own tendency to become easily overloaded by “sensory input?” In either event, I now have the benefit of a small study in our house, to which I withdraw when possible, and it makes life easier — that is, when I can find the time to go there.

Meanwhile, how, pray tell me, do you handle social situations? Going back to life over the road, I eventually took almost all of my meals in the privacy of my truck because the overbearingly loud and empty conversations that seemed to intrude in my head from all corners of the restaurant nearly always put me in an unpleasant mood. Relying again on the INTJ profile simply because it so perfectly encapsulates my own tendencies — while I can engage in intellectually stimulating conversations for hours (yet another reason I love Ricochet Meetups, by the way), the incessant, mundane droning on and on about topics of no real value can wear me down quickly and have me essentially shutting down or retreating into back into the mind.

Perhaps the most ominous factor in the above list of stressors reads, “Not being able to envision the future or see a clear direction in their lives.” Of what use is it, for example, to devise and develop half a dozen essays or column ideas in one morning while behind the wheel if, at the conclusion of a 14-hour work day I barely have time to consume the only meal I’ve had in the last 24 hours before I must rest so as to rise early again the next morning an early and begin it all again? Two weeks later, when I finally have a few hours to write, events have rendered the essays obsolete, and I find myself in that mental fog again, struggling to compose anything meaningful or even relatively coherent.

Writer

A couple of weeks ago, I had been scheduled for a fairly light day behind the wheel, which would leave several hours during which I would be awake and alert enough to work on a piece I had been planning. A quick call from my dispatcher during which he nonchalantly shattered those plans in mere seconds, resulted in me getting home late that evening, physically and mentally spent, another essay unwritten. In my frustration, I told my wife that perhaps I should just give up writing, turn off my brain, drive, eat, sleep, and let it go. Of course, as soon as I said it, I realized that I could no more do that than I could resolve to give up breathing. And besides, that approach would surely contradict my own answer to that question, posed decades ago, concerning a preference for a healthy mind over biological satisfaction.

Ultimately, it’s a question of balance, yes? The requirement to earn a living must be met, and until such time as I can do that with my writing, it means I’ll be behind the wheel. But that requirement, as with the obligations of family and faith, must be balanced with careful attention to maintain those aspects of my mind’s work and those things that keep me, well … me. Once achieved, perhaps that balance will alleviate the current impression that I’m simply spinning my wheels, and I can more fully engage in the world of ideas while resolving what Winston Churchill called the “black dog” of depression.

Meanwhile, I hope to be more active on Ricochet and elsewhere, and remain interested in whether you’ve had similar experiences and how you handled them.

There are 71 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Ball Diamond Ball Inactive

    Excuses. Even the doctor said it didn’t affect your writing.

    Rub some dirt on it.

    • #1
    • October 2, 2016, at 3:14 PM PDT
    • Like
  2. PHCheese Member

    I had a stroke about 25 years ago. I know how you feel.Do what the doctor tells you but above all enjoy your life. I have noticed your scarcity on Ricochet but haven’t noticed any drop off in your intellect. You are a 1% er in that area. Good luck, chin up and God bless.

    • #2
    • October 2, 2016, at 3:26 PM PDT
    • Like
  3. Front Seat Cat Member

    To answer your question, I’d rather be dumb as a box of rocks and have my physical health – I can always learn. To be physically limited would be very frustrating. You had a wake up call – take it all seriously. Change your lifestyle, learn about eating better, taking supplements, exercise, and like PH said, enjoy life. Change jobs if you have to – re-evaluate and do it now. The next time (God forbid) you may not have a second chance.

    • #3
    • October 2, 2016, at 3:31 PM PDT
    • Like
  4. Basil Fawlty Member
    Basil FawltyJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Gary Larson did a famous cartoon of a psychiatrist writing “Just plain nuts” in his notes while interviewing a patient. I’m an ISTJ and it’s always given me comfort.

    • #4
    • October 2, 2016, at 3:39 PM PDT
    • Like
  5. John Walker Contributor

    Basil Fawlty:Gary Larson did a famous cartoon of a psychiatrist writing “Just plain nuts” in his notes while interviewing a patient. I’m an ISTJ and it’s always given me comfort.

    Gary Larson: “Just Plain Nuts”

    • #5
    • October 2, 2016, at 4:09 PM PDT
    • Like
  6. Phil Turmel Coolidge

    Fascinating. I was labeled INTJ many years ago, too, but I’m not too sure that it’s accurate or stable over a lifetime. Most of my business acquaintances label me an extrovert and I generally agree with that assessment. I don’t seem to have any trouble handling social situations — rather enjoy them. But I also like solitude, and to let my mind roam. Maybe I’m just an odd case (-:

    Anyways, as to the problem of writing while trying to drive a truck, maybe you should consider using the voice input mode on a smartphone of some kind — like I’m doing right now. They seem to be remarkably accurate, and because it’s digital you can always go back and re-arrange whatever you put down. This might make it practical to compose posts and comments while driving, vocalizing your roaming mind, and then later editing it into a more formal finished result.

    • #6
    • October 2, 2016, at 4:12 PM PDT
    • Like
  7. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge

    Dave, best of luck in being and staying healthy.

    This is an old one, but exercise helps me enormously with clarity of mind. I suffered a brain injury in 2002. Permanent disability, etc, with serious memory problems. 14 years ago. Let’s just say that without the physical piece, the mental/emotional side would be a mess, and I’d be in a ditch somewhere, holding the rotting remains of a big gulp and whatever dignity I had casually discarded.

    So even with small bites, like walking, I’d make sure to include some of that every single day. Even when you’re working and driving, fit it in. A few years ago I had 1 full time job, a part-time job, and I was taking 2 classes/semester to get my MBA – and I still had time, with all of that, to train for an run my first half-marathon.

    You already have discipline, with your background. Rely on that to help you get the things you need to get done, every day. Make sure the exercise and writing is part of that, every day. Even a little will help, one step, one bite of the elephant, at a time.

    C

    • #7
    • October 2, 2016, at 4:17 PM PDT
    • Like
  8. PHCheese Member

    Phil Turmel:Fascinating. I was labeled INTJ many years ago, too, but I’m not too sure that it’s accurate or stable over a lifetime. Most of my business acquaintances label me an extrovert and I generally agree with that assessment. I don’t seem to have any trouble handling social situations — rather enjoy them. But I also like solitude, and to let my mind roam. Maybe I’m just an odd case (-:

    Anyways, as to the problem of writing while trying to drive a truck, maybe you should consider using the voice input mode on a smartphone of some kind — like I’m doing right now. They seem to be remarkably accurate, and because it’s digital you can always go back and re-arrange whatever you put down. This might make it practical to compose posts and comments while driving, vocalizing your roaming mind, and then later editing it into a more formal finished result.

    Yea try that voice stuff with a Pittsburgh accent .

    • #8
    • October 2, 2016, at 4:19 PM PDT
    • Like
  9. Ansonia Member
    AnsoniaJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I must be an INTJ.

    I’m so grateful you can’t help writing, Dave; in part because you’re so talented and I enjoy reading you. But more for the reason Ben Carson illustrated when he told that funny story, during the speech that got him audited by the I.R.S., about his mother eating the pet parakeets he sent her.

    These 3 things I think about a lot these days for some reason : (1) the punch line to Ben Carson’s story: “they (the talking parakeets) should have said something” (2) the Parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30, Tom just told me.) (3) It was through a weakened, broken Samson that God brought down that false structure.

    You more often think about the weirdest things the older you get, don’t you find?

    • #9
    • October 2, 2016, at 4:38 PM PDT
    • Like
  10. Aaron Miller Member
    Aaron MillerJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    A hippie joke a day keeps the headshrink away.

    For a writer, quiet reflection only deepens depression by channeling it into inner drama. Look out, not in. Sip some lemonade/coffee on a porch with your lovely wife and make fun of the squirrels. Pleasant company and the beauty of nature are good medicine for depression.

    • #10
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:00 PM PDT
    • Like
  11. Ann Inactive

    It’s is always a pleasure reading your posts @davecarter. This one is no exception.

    I’m glad you are feeling better and resolved to moving forward with solutions in mind. I had to smile as you ended by solving your own question to seeing a plan for your future. “until such time as I can do that with my writing, it means I’ll be behind the wheel. ” Your driving is going to make possible your writing. It is making that future possible not taking it away. Every time you have to drive an extra shift you get to build more stories in your mind. They don’t all have to get on to the paper right now.

    If you are good with visual thinking you might try this trick I learned somewhere. When you are having a bad time with something, frustrated or whatever just visualize a suitcase and pack that bag with those bad thoughts and throw that bag right over your shoulder. Sending it all behind you. Sounds goofy I know but it works.

    I look forward to you testing out more essays and stories on us here at Ricochet. Have fun with it.

    • #11
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:02 PM PDT
    • Like
  12. La Tapada Member

    I am sorry to hear you are dealing with these difficulties, Dave.

    As to your initial question, it would be interesting to know if some personality types would prefer a strong and alert mind and others would prefer a perfectly healthy body. (Do you know your Meyers Briggs personality type @frontseatcat?)

    I am an ISFJ and I would choose the strong and alert mind.

    • #12
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:18 PM PDT
    • Like
  13. Quake Voter Inactive

    If this piece emerged from a mental fog, I am somewhat afraid of a Dave Carter piece coming out of clear skies.

    Great read and good luck.

    If I distill the first paragraph to the “Stephen Hawking or Warren Beatty” question, I have to choose the latter, with an embarrassment I don’t think the latter is capable of.

    • #13
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:32 PM PDT
    • Like
  14. Arahant Member

    Phil Turmel: Most of my business acquaintances label me an extrovert and I generally agree with that assessment.

    You may have a different definition of Extrovert and Introvert. In the MBTI, it is about where people get their energy. Do you get it by being in a crowd? Or are you worn down by being in a crowd? Do you get it by reading, writing, or thinking by yourself? Or does that wear you down?

    Also, each of those letters represents a scale. Some people who are rated INTJ are very strongly introverted. Others, not so much. And then there are people who don’t follow the instructions and give the answers they think they should give rather than what is true for them. Lie to the test and get results that are lies.

    • #14
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:34 PM PDT
    • Like
  15. Arahant Member

    Dave Carter:A Re-Cap Of What Causes An INTJ Stress:

    • Being in an environment that doesn’t appreciate their skills or vision.
    • Not enough time alone. Too much socializing.
    • Too much noise or sensory input.
    • Working with those they see as lazy, ignorant, or incompetent.
    • Having to focus on too many details at once.
    • Being in unfamiliar environments.
    • Having their plans disrupted.
    • Having to focus entirely on the here-and-now.
    • Not being able to envision the future or see a clear direction in their lives.

    And now you know why I write. Strong INTJ here, Dave, and I feel your pain. The last corporate job I had was as a road-warrior consultant. Everything the teams did was set up for extroverts, and it nearly killed me. The fourth bullet also didn’t help much. A project manager who doesn’t even know what a communication plan is, let alone having ever created one? A managing consultant who preferred to watch Porsche videos to actually doing work? Oh, yes, point four was a large problem.

    But what I’m going to tell you is that you need a different job, a brain job. You have skills. You have a heckuva a mind. You need to find something that works for you and pays the bills instead of one or the other. Is there a comedy club near you? Have you ever tried stand-up? Are there small businesses nearby that need a manager or a troubleshooter? (More…)

    • #15
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:43 PM PDT
    • Like
  16. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    Quake Voter:If this piece emerged from a mental fog, I am somewhat afraid of a Dave Carter piece coming out of clear skies.

    Great read and good luck.

    If I distill the first paragraph to the “Stephen Hawking or Warren Beatty” question, I have to choose the latter, with an embarrassment I don’t think the latter is capable of.

    Ah, thank you very much! The piece to which you linked was written on a day when the fog had lifted. Regarding the opening question, I never thought there was a right or wrong answer,..both seem perfectly rational to me. Thanks again.

    • #16
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:50 PM PDT
    • Like
  17. Arahant Member

    (Cont. from #15)

    INTJs are natural troubleshooters. Can you take some programming classes? Have you ever had any before? How about being a business analyst who translates the business (requirements) end of things so the programmers can understand them?

    I would be happy to help you brainstorm possibilities. There is much more out there than you may know. If you would like to discuss it further, PM me, and we can set up a time to talk. I have been through it all a few times before.

    • #17
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:50 PM PDT
    • Like
  18. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    Ball Diamond Ball:Excuses. Even the doctor said it didn’t affect your writing.

    Rub some dirt on it.

    Thanks Coach. Seriously,…thanks!

    • #18
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:50 PM PDT
    • Like
  19. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    Phil Turmel:Fascinating. I was labeled INTJ many years ago, too, but I’m not too sure that it’s accurate or stable over a lifetime. Most of my business acquaintances label me an extrovert and I generally agree with that assessment. I don’t seem to have any trouble handling social situations — rather enjoy them. But I also like solitude, and to let my mind roam. Maybe I’m just an odd case (-:

    Anyways, as to the problem of writing while trying to drive a truck, maybe you should consider using the voice input mode on a smartphone of some kind — like I’m doing right now. They seem to be remarkably accurate, and because it’s digital you can always go back and re-arrange whatever you put down. This might make it practical to compose posts and comments while driving, vocalizing your roaming mind, and then later editing it into a more formal finished result.

    I’ve tried voice input before, mixed results. Think I’ll give it another go though. Thanks.

    • #19
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:52 PM PDT
    • Like
  20. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    Chris Campion:Dave, best of luck in being and staying healthy.

    This is an old one, but exercise helps me enormously with clarity of mind. I suffered a brain injury in 2002. Permanent disability, etc, with serious memory problems. 14 years ago. Let’s just say that without the physical piece, the mental/emotional side would be a mess, and I’d be in a ditch somewhere, holding the rotting remains of a big gulp and whatever dignity I had casually discarded.

    So even with small bites, like walking, I’d make sure to include some of that every single day. Even when you’re working and driving, fit it in. A few years ago I had 1 full time job, a part-time job, and I was taking 2 classes/semester to get my MBA – and I still had time, with all of that, to train for an run my first half-marathon.

    You already have discipline, with your background. Rely on that to help you get the things you need to get done, every day. Make sure the exercise and writing is part of that, every day. Even a little will help, one step, one bite of the elephant, at a time.

    C

    Solid advice Chris. Thank you.

    • #20
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:53 PM PDT
    • Like
  21. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    Arahant:(Cont. from #15)

    INTJs are natural troubleshooters. Can you take some programming classes? Have you ever had any before? How about being a business analyst who translates the business (requirements) end of things so the programmers can understand them?

    I would be happy to help you brainstorm possibilities. There is much more out there than you may know. If you would like to discuss it further, PM me, and we can set up a time to talk. I have been through it all a few times before.

    I may take you up on that.

    • #21
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:54 PM PDT
    • Like
  22. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    Aaron Miller:A hippie joke a day keeps the headshrink away.

    For a writer, quiet reflection only deepens depression by channeling it into inner drama. Look out, not in. Sip some lemonade/coffee on a porch with your lovely wife and make fun of the squirrels. Pleasant company and the beauty of nature are good medicine for depression.

    Interesting,…one of the things the doctor suggested is get outdoors more, enjoy the sunshine, relax occasionally. I need to do that to.

    • #22
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:55 PM PDT
    • Like
  23. Arahant Member

    Dave Carter: I’ve tried voice input before, mixed results. Think I’ll give it another go though. Thanks.

    I can just imagine what Alphonse would get from voice input. ;)

    • #23
    • October 2, 2016, at 5:56 PM PDT
    • Like
  24. Phil Turmel Coolidge

    Arahant:

    Phil Turmel: Most of my business acquaintances label me an extrovert and I generally agree with that assessment.

    You may have a different definition of Extrovert and Introvert. In the MBTI, it is about where people get their energy. Do you get it by being in a crowd? Or are you worn down by being in a crowd? Do you get it by reading, writing, or thinking by yourself? Or does that wear you down?

    Hmm. Neither wears me down. I like crowds and public speaking. I like being alone with my thoughts. My business acquaintances see the former. Only my family and closest friends see the latter. I just stumped my wife with the question. Her final answer: Maybe an extrovert. We’ve been married almost 28 years, and that’s the verdict.

    • #24
    • October 2, 2016, at 6:09 PM PDT
    • Like
  25. Arahant Member

    Phil Turmel: Hmm. Neither wears me down. I like crowds and public speaking. I like being alone with my thoughts. My business acquaintances see the former. Only my family and closest friends see the latter. I just stumped my wife with the question. Her final answer: Maybe an extrovert. We’ve been married almost 28 years, and that’s the verdict.

    You may be close to the middle on the I-E scale, but the INTJ also seems like an extrovert to others. Dave mentioned the introverted intuition, but they (we) also have extroverted thinking. I also am very good at public speaking, have been president or chairman of a number of organizations, am platform assistant at church quite often, especially with guest ministers or guest speakers. If you are strong on the Introversion, but manage to get enough alone time to recharge, you might not notice the drain from various events. Also, being the speaker is different as far as energy capacitance than just being part of the crowd. (I have also been a musician and poet, performing in front of crowds.) Unless you have really thought about the issue and have analyzed the interactions and your energy levels, it may be hard to say, but do not trust the word of others on this.

    • #25
    • October 2, 2016, at 6:19 PM PDT
    • Like
  26. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    Arahant:

    Phil Turmel: Hmm. Neither wears me down. I like crowds and public speaking. I like being alone with my thoughts. My business acquaintances see the former. Only my family and closest friends see the latter. I just stumped my wife with the question. Her final answer: Maybe an extrovert. We’ve been married almost 28 years, and that’s the verdict.

    You may be close to the middle on the I-E scale, but the INTJ also seems like an extrovert to others. Dave mentioned the introverted intuition, but they (we) also have extroverted thinking. I also am very good at public speaking, have been president or chairman of a number of organizations, am platform assistant at church quite often, especially with guest ministers or guest speakers. If you are strong on the Introversion, but manage to get enough alone time to recharge, you might not notice the drain from various events. Also, being the speaker is different as far as energy capacitance than just being part of the crowd. (I have also been a musician and poet, performing in front of crowds.) Unless you have really thought about the issue and have analyzed the interactions and your energy levels, it may be hard to say, but do not trust the word of others on this.

    Sounds like me as well. I actually enjoy public speaking, I adore my time at Ricochet Meet Ups, and can enjoy a great many social situations. But there is a time-stamp on them,..and after awhile I simply must step back or check out somehow.

    • #26
    • October 2, 2016, at 6:28 PM PDT
    • Like
  27. DocJay Inactive

    Love ya man.

    What is the introvert thing you speak of?

    • #27
    • October 2, 2016, at 7:03 PM PDT
    • Like
  28. Arahant Member

    DocJay: What is the introvert thing you speak of?

    Nothing to do with you. Just move along on that one, Doc.

    • #28
    • October 2, 2016, at 7:06 PM PDT
    • Like
  29. Dave Carter Podcaster
    Dave Carter

    DocJay:Love ya man.

    What is the introvert thing you speak of?

    Back at ya, Doc. And whadaya mean “What is the introvert thing” I speak of? Wait,…you ARE an introvert as well, right?

    • #29
    • October 2, 2016, at 7:06 PM PDT
    • Like
  30. doulalady Member
    doulaladyJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Good lord! I think we could be twins. What cannot be cured, (one’s temperament) must be endured, but not in a horrendous way.

    One thing I have noticed about pain, physical or psychological, is that one needs only to ramp it down a little to make it very tolerable. So I look for small incremental mitigations, rather than longing for perfect solutions. Much more realistic.

    To tip the balance in my favor I am incredibly thoughtful and efficient about how I undertake those tasks which are under my control. I make sure to minimize, to the greatest extent possible, my unpleasant but inescapable obligations, by applying my mind to dealing with them in the most efficient manner possible….Thus increasing my free time to do as I please. That is for hanging out on my own.

    I apply this technique to all practical matters, like housework and also volunteer work.

    For instance I was asked to organize a funeral luncheon at my church for about fifty people. I decided to see how long it would take if I handled it all by myself. I got the relevant information, made a few notes, planned the meal, shopped, prepped, and dropped off the food at the parish center. The next morning I picked flowers from my garden on my way to the car, set up the room, etc etc etc. I was done with clean up, and on my way home shortly after the last lingering members of the family left with the left-overs. It took me a total of three hours work.

    I timed the next funeral luncheon. It took the usual team of 6 to 8 people about fifteen hours. By taking care of the task efficiently I had gained for myself twelve hours of FREE TIME! Just for me. That’s how I tip the balance in my favor.

    Every little bit helps to make my life more tolerable. I’ve set up my whole home to be ultra efficient too. Not only do I minimize my workload, but I have minimized the amount I might need to pay someone to do it to my standards if/when I can no longer do it myself. I don’t feel the slightest bit guilty for using any time gained for my own pleasure.

    Maybe you could record your ideas when you are on the road. There must be a voice-activated app for that. When you’re free you could probably play it back at as high a speed as you can handle to refresh your memory.

    • #30
    • October 2, 2016, at 7:20 PM PDT
    • Like

Comments are closed because this post is more than six months old. Please write a new post if you would like to continue this conversation.