Glyphs on Globalism

 

Flag-map_of_the_worldOne thing about Donald Trump that everyone on Ricochet agrees on — from the most stubborn #NeverTrump to the most enthused Trump supporter — is that Trump is a nationalist, someone who places the well-being, security, and prosperity of the United States above those of other countries. Trump’s nationalism is often among the top reasons his supporters cite in his favor, and (unsurprisingly) they often accuse anti-Trump voices of being globalists, usually in the same tones that were once reserved for heretics, traitors, and people who drive too slow in the passing lane. More recently, Trump’s rise has been likened to the Brexit vote, not only because both represent successful nationalist movements that had been scoffed at by the political establishment, but because both Trump and Nigel Farage have made the connection explicit (H/T @columbo).

But while the comparison between Trump and Brexit is real and significant, it’s only part of the story. How else, for instance, to explain why Daniel Hannan — Farage’s colleague in both the EU Parliament and the Brexit battle — is among the most vociferous anti-Trump voices on the Right? (If you haven’t, listen to Jay Nordlinger’s recent interview with him). The answer, I think, is that nationalism vs. globalism is only one of several political dimensions that deserve our attention.

For example, lost in the talk of late has been the related-but-discrete topic of whether our society should be engaged vs. closed. Both Hannan and Matt Ridley are nationalists who campaigned for Brexit, but their arguments often hinged on how the EU forced Britain to limit its engagement to the Continent rather than giving it the run of the world to seek allies, or to have its people ply their wares, travel, or find bargains.

Similarly, it’s a mistake to evaluate on nationalistic grounds without also considering the left vs. right spectrum. Senator Bernie Sanders, after all, has a strong nationalistic streak — often criticizing free trade and foreign manufacturing in tones that sound a lot like Trump’s — though with leftism rather than Trump’s populism as the solution.

The question, I think shouldn’t be whether Trump is a nationalist but, rather, what kind of a nationalist he is.

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  1. Pseudodionysius Inactive
    Pseudodionysius
    @Pseudodionysius

    Farage was born in Downe, England, as the son of Barbara (née Stevens) and Guy Justus Oscar Farage.[14][15][16] The Farage name comes from a distant Huguenot ancestor.[17] One of his great-grandfathers was born to German parents who migrated to London in the 19th century.[18] His grandfather, Private Harry Farage, fought in World War I and was wounded near Vimy Ridge at Arras.[19] His father was a stockbroker who worked in the City of London. A 2012 BBC Radio 4 profile described Guy Farage as an alcoholic[14] who left the family home when Nigel was five years old.[6]

    Farage was educated at Dulwich College, an independent school with a wide social mix in south London,[20] and in his autobiography he pays tribute to the careers advice he received there from England Test cricketer John Dewes, “who must have spotted that I was quite ballsy, probably good on a platform, unafraid of the limelight, a bit noisy and good at selling things”.[21] On leaving school in 1982, he decided not to go to university, but to work in the City, trading commodities at the London Metal Exchange.[14] Initially, he joined the American commodity operation of brokerage firm Drexel Burnham Lambert,[16] transferring to Credit Lyonnais Rouse in 1986.[16] He joined Refco in 1994, and Natexis Metals in 2003.[16]

    • #1
  2. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: is that Trump is a nationalist, someone who places the well-being, security, and prosperity of the United States above those of other countries.

    No. We don’t all agree. Trump places himself above all else. Anyone that will insult people so freely will come after you or your friend as soon as he’s in a mood to do so, and the country be damned.

    • #2
  3. Jamie Lockett Inactive
    Jamie Lockett
    @JamieLockett

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: but because both Trump and Nigel Farage have made the connection explicit

    Remember when Nigel Farage got really mad at a US politician for interfering with the elections in his own country. Ah, good times.

    • #3
  4. BD Member
    BD
    @

    I like Daniel Hannan, but he supported Barack Obama in 2008.

    • #4
  5. Jamie Lockett Inactive
    Jamie Lockett
    @JamieLockett

    BD:

    I like Daniel Hannan, but he supported Barack Obama in 2008.

    Meh, so did the current Republican nominee for President:

    http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0904/15/lkl.01.html

    http://www.westernjournalism.com/revealed-what-donald-trump-said-about-obama-in-2009-will-make-you-question-everything/

    Heck, in 2008 the current Republican nominee supported his current opponent:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-in-2008-hillary-clinton-would-make-a-great-president/

    I’ve lost track of who we are supposed to hold to their past statements and who we aren’t.

    • #5
  6. BD Member
    BD
    @

    Note:

    Personal attack.

    Jamie Lockett:

    BD:

    I like Daniel Hannan, but he supported Barack Obama in 2008.

    Meh, so did the current Republican nominee for President:

    http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0904/15/lkl.01.html

    http://www.westernjournalism.com/revealed-what-donald-trump-said-about-obama-in-2009-will-make-you-question-everything/

    Heck, in 2008 the current Republican nominee supported his current opponent:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-in-2008-hillary-clinton-would-make-a-great-president/

    I’ve lost track of who we are supposed to hold to their past statements and who we aren’t.

    No, you hold Trump accountable, while keeping your Rubio Fanboy Goggles on 24/7, flip-flops or no.

    • #6
  7. Canadian Cincinnatus Inactive
    Canadian Cincinnatus
    @CanadianCincinnatus

    Very good analysis Tom.

    • #7
  8. Pseudodionysius Inactive
    Pseudodionysius
    @Pseudodionysius

    Jamie Lockett:

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: but because both Trump and Nigel Farage have made the connection explicit

    Remember when Nigel Farage got really mad at a US politician for interfering with the elections in his own country. Ah, good times.

    Which he mentions in the speech, if you’ve watched it. He also mentioned the manner in which they were hectored and talked down to. He not only mentioned it in the video excerpt but wrote about it in the Daily Mail

    And then he called me up on stage. I told them that Brexit was the victory of the little people over the Establishment. They went wild. I told them that if you can motivate non-voters to engage with the electoral process that anything was possible. I did not endorse Trump, because I had condemned President Obama for telling us what to do in our referendum. But I did say that if I was a US citizen I would not vote for Hillary Clinton even if she paid me.

    • #8
  9. Jamie Lockett Inactive
    Jamie Lockett
    @JamieLockett

    BD:

    Jamie Lockett:

    BD:

    I like Daniel Hannan, but he supported Barack Obama in 2008.

    Meh, so did the current Republican nominee for President:

    http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0904/15/lkl.01.html

    http://www.westernjournalism.com/revealed-what-donald-trump-said-about-obama-in-2009-will-make-you-question-everything/

    Heck, in 2008 the current Republican nominee supported his current opponent:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-in-2008-hillary-clinton-would-make-a-great-president/

    I’ve lost track of who we are supposed to hold to their past statements and who we aren’t.

    No, you hold Trump accountable, while keeping your Rubio Fanboy Goggles on 24/7, flip-flops or no.

    I was simply making a general statement as to politicians penchant for making contradictory statements. The personal attack is appreciated though.

    • #9
  10. skipsul Inactive
    skipsul
    @skipsul

    Jamie Lockett:

    BD:

    I like Daniel Hannan, but he supported Barack Obama in 2008.

    Meh, so did the current Republican nominee for President:

    http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0904/15/lkl.01.html

    http://www.westernjournalism.com/revealed-what-donald-trump-said-about-obama-in-2009-will-make-you-question-everything/

    Heck, in 2008 the current Republican nominee supported his current opponent:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-in-2008-hillary-clinton-would-make-a-great-president/

    I’ve lost track of who we are supposed to hold to their past statements and who we aren’t.

    I just don’t take any of them at their word. Makes it easier.

    • #10
  11. Jamie Lockett Inactive
    Jamie Lockett
    @JamieLockett

    Pseudodionysius:

    Jamie Lockett:

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: but because both Trump and Nigel Farage have made the connection explicit

    Remember when Nigel Farage got really mad at a US politician for interfering with the elections in his own country. Ah, good times.

    Which he mentions in the speech, if you’ve watched it. He also mentioned the manner in which they were hectored and talked down to. He not only mentioned it in the video excerpt but wrote about it in the Daily Mail

    And then he called me up on stage. I told them that Brexit was the victory of the little people over the Establishment. They went wild. I told them that if you can motivate non-voters to engage with the electoral process that anything was possible. I did not endorse Trump, because I had condemned President Obama for telling us what to do in our referendum. But I did say that if I was a US citizen I would not vote for Hillary Clinton even if she paid me.

    Ah, so Farage is a weaselly politician like all of the rest – you don’t speak at a Trump rally if you’re opposed to the man becoming President. Give me a break.

    • #11
  12. Marion Evans Inactive
    Marion Evans
    @MarionEvans

    If you could export apartments in shipping containers and sell them in Europe and China along with their garish T-emblazoned gold, marble and glass lobbies, Trump would be the BIGGEST globalist on earth. It’s all about him.

    Further, nationalism and globalism are not opposites. Globalization enriches your country. But I may be preaching to the choir here.

    • #12
  13. Tom Meyer Contributor
    Tom Meyer
    @tommeyer

    Farage claiming that he didn’t endorse Trump — technically true! — but merely spoke at one of his campaign rallies, after being introduced by the candidate himself is a rather fine distinction.

    • #13
  14. Jamie Lockett Inactive
    Jamie Lockett
    @JamieLockett

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: The question, I think shouldn’t be whether Trump is a nationalist but, rather, what kind of a nationalist he is.

    Back to @tomdmeyer‘s original question: one of the things that irks many of us so much about the causal and clearly derisive accusations of “globalist” hurled whenever we speak in opposition of policies by certain political leaders is that many of us hold these ideologies for entirely nationalist reasons. For example, I am a free trader because I want what is best for America. I favor a pluralistic and diverse society, as opposed to white nationalism, because I believe it strengthens America. People are more than free to point out how my positions are actually harming America, but to simply drop the accusation of “Globalist!” – like a giant stink bomb in church – does nothing to further the conversation or get us closer to the truth.

    • #14
  15. Schwaibold Member
    Schwaibold
    @Schwaibold

    Skyler:

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: is that Trump is a nationalist, someone who places the well-being, security, and prosperity of the United States above those of other countries.

    No. We don’t all agree. Trump places himself above all else. Anyone that will insult people so freely will come after you or your friend as soon as he’s in a mood to do so, and the country be damned.

    The Three Laws of Trumpbotics:
    1. Any statement or action may not injure Trump or, through inaction, allow Trump to come to harm.

    2. All Trump subordinates must obey orders given to them by Trump except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.

    3. Trump Subordinates must protect the interests of the United States of America as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

    • #15
  16. Matt Bartle Member
    Matt Bartle
    @MattBartle

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: The question, I think shouldn’t be whether Trump is a nationalist but, rather, what kind of a nationalist he is.

    The winning kind, obviously!

    • #16
  17. KC Mulville Inactive
    KC Mulville
    @KCMulville

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: The question, I think shouldn’t be whether Trump is a nationalist but, rather, what kind of a nationalist he is.

    I’ll buy that, because I believe that the premise of both capitalism and nationalism is competition. The benefit of competition is that it forces players to improve, constantly. The fun comes from the fact that while each player strives to improve themselves, everyone benefits. You strive for excellence, and that’s a good thing.

    But similarly, the danger of competition is when it doesn’t matter whether you improve, or merely you can cause your opponents to fail. Instead of striving for excellence, it becomes a race to the bottom. The telltale difference is whether you want the competition to keep going even after you succeed. It’s “crony capitalism” when you erect barriers to prevent others from competing, rather than striving to more excellence. When you use government regulations to stop your competitors, you’re just a crony.

    Trump’s a crony capitalist. His legion of lawyers aggressively sue any competitors. He “uses the law to his advantage,” which means he stiffs his creditors when necessary. So when Trump wants tariffs, is it to level the playing field, or tilt it? When Trump considers trade deals, is it to ensure honest competition, or to impose an unfair advantage?

    “America first” is a healthy, competitive attitude. “America only, screw everyone else” is not.

    • #17
  18. Tyler Boliver Inactive
    Tyler Boliver
    @TylerBoliver

    The first time I had the term “globalist” thrown my way, it came from a far left college student who screamed at me because I was nothing more than a “globalist stooge in the pocket of internationalist corporations!” Why was I called this? Because I defended capitalism and free trade.

    Most of the insults I get now for being a “globalist” are basically for the same thing. Whether it’s from a guy wrapping himself up in the flag, or a Marxist college kid who hasn’t taken a bath in a month for fear it may destroy the environment. All of this, despite the indisputable fact that capitalism has done more to enrich this country, and bring us success than any thing else.

    • #18
  19. Pseudodionysius Inactive
    Pseudodionysius
    @Pseudodionysius

    Tom Meyer, Ed.:Farage claiming that he didn’t endorse Trump — technically true! — but merely spoke at one of his campaign rallies, after being introduced by the candidate himself is a rather fine distinction.

    Did you read the article Farage wrote? He was supposed to merely speak amongst a roster of speakers and Rudy G was to be the lead off speaker. Rudy was none too pleased at the last minute substitution.

    • #19
  20. Jamie Lockett Inactive
    Jamie Lockett
    @JamieLockett

    Pseudodionysius:

    Tom Meyer, Ed.:Farage claiming that he didn’t endorse Trump — technically true! — but merely spoke at one of his campaign rallies, after being introduced by the candidate himself is a rather fine distinction.

    Did you read the article Farage wrote? He was supposed to merely speak amongst a roster of speakers and Rudy G was to be the lead off speaker. Rudy was none too pleased at the last minute substitution.

    So what? If he actually believed that politicians shouldn’t interfere with foreign elections then he never would have spoken at a Trump rally in the first place.

    • #20
  21. Tom Meyer Contributor
    Tom Meyer
    @tommeyer

    Pseudodionysius:

    Did you read the article Farage wrote?

    I did.

    For the record, I don’t have a problem with his having spoken there. I just find the excuses kind of lame.

    • #21
  22. Austin Murrey Inactive
    Austin Murrey
    @AustinMurrey

    Tom Meyer, Ed.:Farage claiming that he didn’t endorse Trump — technically true! — but merely spoke at one of his campaign rallies, after being introduced by the candidate himself is a rather fine distinction.

    Well they attacked Cruz for the same thing in reverse so I don’t see the issue.

    /sarc

    • #22
  23. Herbert E. Meyer Contributor
    Herbert E. Meyer
    @HerbertEMeyer

    One of the problems with this debate over nationalism-versus-globalism is that — as with so many other debates — we argue before we understand.

    “Globalism” has become a shorthand way of saying “you’re an anti-American loser who doesn’t care about our country.”

    “Nationalism” has become a shorthand way of saying President Bush and all his supporters were wrong to invade Iraq and try to bring the Mideast into the modern world.

    “Globalization” is an economic tidal wave that is making every product available all over the world at the lowest possible price.

    It’s a shame that neither the GOP nor the Democratic candidate has the intellectual firepower — or, more importantly – – the political will to explain….which is, of course, another word for “persuade.”

    • #23
  24. Austin Murrey Inactive
    Austin Murrey
    @AustinMurrey

    Herbert E. Meyer:

    “Globalism” has become a shorthand way of saying “you’re an anti-American loser who doesn’t care about our country.”

    I think there are actual “globalists” of that strain – many appear to make careers in the State Department – although I prefer “Transnational Progressives.”

    George Soros is that kind of globalist.

    Free traders aren’t that kind of globalist but sadly they typically lack the ability to explain exactly why they aren’t.

    It’s actually hard to explain why closing a factory in Erie, PA and opening it up in Guangdong, China is a good thing for the people losing their jobs in that factory. When we don’t try to explain and refer people to books it gets worse.

    Milton Friedman was great at that crucial step.

    • #24
  25. Tenacious D Inactive
    Tenacious D
    @TenaciousD

    Tom Meyer, Ed.: For example, lost in the talk of late has been the related-but-discrete topic of whether our society should be engaged vs. closed. Both Hannan and Matt Ridley are nationalists who campaigned for Brexit, but their arguments often hinged on how the EU forced Britain to limit its engagement to the Continent rather than giving it the run of the world to seek allies, or to have its people ply their wares, travel, or find bargains.

    This dimension deserves more discussion, in my opinion.

    • #25
  26. Viator Inactive
    Viator
    @Viator

    Trump’s nationalism is often among the top reasons his detractors cite to his detriment, and (unsurprisingly) they often accuse pro-Trump voices of being nationalists, usually in the same tones that were once reserved for heretics, traitors, and people who drive too slow in the passing lane.

    • #26
  27. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    First, thank you @tommeyered for the ping to my earlier conversation. I truly love Nigel Farage as a politician and articulate advocate for rational government.

    I think that Trump and Farage have parallels in the “kind” (not sure what that means exactly) of nationalists they are. They generally believe that an elected “government” should represent the primary interests of its citizens first. Surely, they also believe that there is a world economy and that it is more globalized and one can’t be an isolationist or ignore world problems and issues that affect all. But that you make trade deals most favorable to your nation.

    Here’s a prime example. Today, the EU has ordered Apple to pay up to $14-5b in tax to Ireland EU.

    “Ireland granted illegal tax benefits to Apple, which enabled it to pay substantially less tax than other businesses over many years,” said Competition Commission Margrethe Vestager, whose crackdown on mainly U.S. multinationals has angered Washington which accuses Brussels of protectionism.

    “I disagree profoundly with the Commission,” Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan said in a statement. “The decision leaves me with no choice but to seek cabinet approval to appeal.

    “This is necessary to defend the integrity of our tax system; to provide tax certainty to business; and to challenge the encroachment of EU state aid rules into the sovereign member state competence of taxation.”

    The sovereignty of England or the United States must reign supreme over Commissars or Commissioners like Margrethe.

    nigel

    • #27
  28. CM Member
    CM
    @CM

    Jamie Lockett: I favor a pluralistic and diverse society, as opposed to white nationalism, because I believe it strengthens America.

    Diversity, outside of thought and bloodlines, does not strengthen.

    Religion – consider the history of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism. What, in its mingling, has resulted in strength? I see there are burned churches throughout the ME that show just how strong the current struggle is.

    Values – we fought a civil war over values. What about that war strengthened us? We are currently strongly divided on world-oriented and value driven ideologies and the “left” and “right” are constantly at each other’s throats. Is this what we call strength?

    Culture – I believe it was an African colonist in the Americas who wanted his indentured servant to be a lifelong slave? And the courts thought it would be wrong to deny him his cultural heritage so allowed it? How is this different from allowing segments of the Muslim population to create their own sharia-compliant ghettos within France, England, and the US?

    (cont)

    • #28
  29. CM Member
    CM
    @CM

    Tribes – As much as well-meaning conservatives like to deny it, people prefer the company of people who look like them. Its why my church is predominately Hispanic. Its why you can see the tables at lunch in your place of work are separated by nationality and ethnic heritage. Its why college students are demanding “Black Only” dorms and rec halls. Its what drives anything from gangs to identity politics.

    All of these things are not STRENGTH. They fracture us like dropping a bowl. It might not be broken, but those hairline fractures suggest the next time it drops, it shatters.

    • #29
  30. Viator Inactive
    Viator
    @Viator

    Is this free trade? Is this globalization and is it favorable to the US and it’s income earners and their families? Does this encourage healthy American family formation and dynamics?

    “More than 20 countries have increased their aggregate foreign exchange reserves and other official foreign assets by an annual average of nearly $1 trillion in recent years. This buildup of official assets—mainly through intervention in the foreign exchange markets—keeps the currencies of the interveners substantially undervalued, thus boosting their international competitiveness and trade surpluses. The corresponding trade deficits are spread around the world, but the largest share of the loss centers on the United States, whose trade deficit has increased by $200 billion to $500 billion per year as a result. The United States has lost 1 million to 5 million jobs due to this foreign currency manipulation.”

    https://piie.com/publications/pb/pb12-25.pdf

    • #30

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