Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Teaser: Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk

 

Now we’re talking. For his next movie, Christopher Nolan turns his attention to the evacuation of Allied forces from France in 1940. Don’t tell anyone, but I think Nolan is a closet conservative: It’s just an opinion, of course, but there are telling moments in many of his films and in particular The Dark Knight Rises and Interstellar.

Dunkirk comes out next July and will star Tom Hardy, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance, and Kenneth Branagh.

There are 41 comments.

  1. MLH Inactive
    MLH

    Definitely a teaser!

    • #1
    • August 4, 2016, at 7:03 PM PST
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  2. Probable Cause Inactive

    The subject is certainly worthy of a cinematic treatment. I wonder how Nolan’s style will translate to a war movie.

    • #2
    • August 4, 2016, at 7:21 PM PST
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  3. Arahant Member

    • #3
    • August 4, 2016, at 7:25 PM PST
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  4. Knotwise the Poet Member

    I’ve been very excited for this film ever since it was announced. Really, I’ll be excited for any film if Nolan’s directing it. But what really interests me in this project is that it’ll be a change of genre for Nolan. He’s been very successful doing comic boo and scifi films, but I do think the last 2 films of his, Dark Knight Rises and Interestellar, were marred by a lot of plot holes, so I’m glad he’s flexing his creative muscles and turning to something new for him- the historical war epic.

    One of Nolan’s strengths is how authentic and real he makes all his films look, tastefully using CGI in support of lots of practical in-camera effects. I can’t wait to see what all epic visuals he’s putting together in this film.

    • #4
    • August 4, 2016, at 7:53 PM PST
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  5. Profile Photo Member

    There is a so-so movie from a couple of years ago called Atonement. It has a 5-minute scene at Dunkirk that is quite incredible.

    • #5
    • August 4, 2016, at 7:53 PM PST
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  6. Knotwise the Poet Member

    Brian Watt:

    Don’t tell anyone but I think Nolan is a closet conservative…it’s just an opinion, of course but there are telling moments in many of his films and in particular The Dark Knight Rises and Interstellar.

    In the past Andrew Klavan has expressed his certainty that The Dark Knight was a defense of George W. Bush’s policies in the War on Terror. I doubt that was Nolan’s intention, and I am hesitant to assume that any Hollywood figure is a conservative unless they explicitly self-identify as one, but I think you’re correct that in Nolan’s films there’s a lot of plot points that seem to reveal a worldview that, if it’s not conservative (and maybe it is), is at least not doctrinaire liberal. One creative choice that I found interesting was that in Interstellar Nolan did not have the world-ending disaster be man-made climate change, which is something I think any typical liberal filmmaker would have done if they were in charge of the story.

    • #6
    • August 4, 2016, at 7:54 PM PST
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  7. Knotwise the Poet Member

    Quinn the Eskimo:There is a so-so movie from a couple of years ago called Atonement. It has a 5-minute scene at Dunkirk that is quite incredible.

    I’ve never watched the movie, but I heard about the sequence and looked it up on youtube. It’s a fantastically constructed scene (and I’m a sucker for long uncut takes in films).

    Warning: Some NSFW language at the beginning.

    • #7
    • August 4, 2016, at 7:56 PM PST
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  8. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt Post author

    Knotwise the Poet:

    Brian Watt:

    Don’t tell anyone but I think Nolan is a closet conservative…it’s just an opinion, of course but there are telling moments in many of his films and in particular The Dark Knight Rises and Interstellar.

    In the past Andrew Klavan has expressed his certainty that The Dark Knight was a defense of George W. Bush’s policies in the War on Terror. I doubt that was Nolan’s intention, and I am hesitant to assume that any Hollywood figure is a conservative unless they explicitly self-identify as one, but I think you’re correct that in Nolan’s films there’s a lot of plot points that seem to reveal a worldview that, if it’s not conservative (and maybe it is), is at least not doctrinaire liberal. One creative choice that I found interesting was that in Interstellar Nolan did not have the world-ending disaster be man-made climate change, which is something I think any typical liberal filmmaker would have done if they were in charge of the story.

    There are more tells in Interstellar. What jumped out at me when I first saw it was the elementary school pushing the idea that the NASA Apollo missions and the moon landings were all faked for anti-communist propaganda purposes. That Nolan and his brother who co-wrote the script would put this notion coming from a public school was rather Orwellian.

    In The Dark Knight Rises, Anne Hathaway’s Selina is a thief who sympathizes with anarchists who want to tear down the social order of society, until she actually witnesses the evil of the mob and the sorrow and devastation of their victims. That’s a definite slam at the Occupy Wall Street/Socialist mobs. Not to mention, Bane’s take down of Wall Street.

    • #8
    • August 4, 2016, at 8:05 PM PST
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  9. EJHill Podcaster

    I am a fan of his brother, Jonathan. His late series on CBS, Person of Interest, was at the least very libertarian if not conservative.

    Plus, it starred Jim Caviezel. (Or, as my Marine says about the star of The Passion of the Christ, “Our savior kicks ass!”)

    Hollywood can be very good at producing programs that show that government is not always your friend. Yet, that’s not how they vote.

    • #9
    • August 4, 2016, at 9:39 PM PST
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  10. Robert McReynolds Inactive

    Wow that was powerful Teaser. Thanks for sharing.

    • #10
    • August 5, 2016, at 1:46 AM PST
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  11. Titus Techera Contributor

    Mr. Nolan is a very interesting director, but he is not a Hollywood figure–he started making movies in England & his first American movie is what you might call independent, Memento. I don’t think it’s a movie Americans would like; or should like. I believe the phrase educated people use is, moral relativism. So also his first studio movie, Insomnia. These are stories that suggest there is by nature no justice. His Batman movies are, however successful, rather explicit about the debt he owes to a study of Greek tragedy, another very un-American thing. (You might want to look at his movie about magic & science, The prestige. Would not that qualify as nihilism?) Inception is like his early movies in its questioning of nature & justice, but at least seems more confident that there is some good available to human beings.

    Interstellar is different. It seems designed to give some confidence to Americans in a time when almost no one sees any reason to be confident that there is a future, much less that it’s good. It owes far more to Southern Stoicism than to anything foreign to America, which is also a new departure. If you compare, you will notice that this is the only really American story he’s told. Some are not set in America; one’s a Swedish remake; none of the others owe much to their American setting–except the Batman movies, & only those only in part.

    • #11
    • August 5, 2016, at 2:16 AM PST
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  12. Tom Meyer, Common Citizen Contributor

    Color me very interested.

    That scene in the boats with the Stuka siren — and the soldiers’ reaction — is fantastic film-making; first the sound and then the visual reaction.

    • #12
    • August 5, 2016, at 4:21 AM PST
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  13. Tom Meyer, Common Citizen Contributor

    Knotwise the Poet:

    Quinn the Eskimo:There is a so-so movie from a couple of years ago called Atonement. It has a 5-minute scene at Dunkirk that is quite incredible.

    I’ve never watched the movie, but I heard about the sequence and looked it up on youtube. It’s a fantastically constructed scene (and I’m a sucker for long uncut takes in films).

    Warning: Some NSFW language at the beginning.

    I was thinking of that myself a moment ago. For the record, I highly recommend the movie. A lot of folks seemed to have misunderstood the ending.

    • #13
    • August 5, 2016, at 4:24 AM PST
    • Like
  14. Tom Meyer, Common Citizen Contributor

    Knotwise the Poet: But what really interests me in this project is that it’ll be a change of genre for Nolan. He’s been very successful doing comic boo and scifi films, but I do think the last 2 films of his, Dark Knight Rises and Interestellar, were marred by a lot of plot holes, so I’m glad he’s flexing his creative muscles and turning to something new for him- the historical war epic.

    Very much agreed. On second viewing, I found that The Dark Knight also badly suffered from this.

    • #14
    • August 5, 2016, at 4:25 AM PST
    • Like
  15. MLH Inactive
    MLH

    @titustechera, I enjoyed Memento and The Prestige. Should I be emigrating?

    • #15
    • August 5, 2016, at 6:12 AM PST
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  16. Titus Techera Contributor

    MLH: I enjoyed Memento and The Prestige. Should I be emigrating?

    I don’t know, M. First, how did you like the endings?

    • #16
    • August 5, 2016, at 6:18 AM PST
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  17. MLH Inactive
    MLH

    Titus Techera:

    MLH: I enjoyed Memento and The Prestige. Should I be emigrating?

    I don’t know, M. First, how did you like the endings?

    hhmmm, welll, maybe I just liked the actors. . . I will have to re-watch to answer your question.

    • #17
    • August 5, 2016, at 6:29 AM PST
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  18. Titus Techera Contributor

    MLH:

    Titus Techera:

    MLH: I enjoyed Memento and The Prestige. Should I be emigrating?

    I don’t know, M. First, how did you like the endings?

    hhmmm, welll, maybe I just liked the actors. . . I will have to re-watch to answer your question.

    Now I’ve done it! Don’t rewatch, M! It’s perfectly possible for people to watch innocently–& both the actors & the cinematography, scenography, editing, &c. are quite bewitching. But the endings are as good as designed to rob people of their innocence. I’m glad it’s not worked on you, but I wouldn’t want to tempt Mr. Nolan-

    • #18
    • August 5, 2016, at 6:36 AM PST
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  19. Cornelius Julius Sebastian Inactive

    Thanks for this tip, Bri. Looks great and I agree, there are interesting hints in Nolan’s work that he has some right of center leaning. Deo gratias.

    • #19
    • August 5, 2016, at 6:50 AM PST
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  20. ToryWarWriter Thatcher

    If anyone is interested the book Retreat into Victory covers Dunkirk and the whole fall of France from the British perspective. It does do a good job of dispelling the absolute garbage myth, that Hitler let the British escape by allowing the air force to do all the work.

    People forget that Paris doesn’t fall for another 3 weeks and that the entire French army is still fighting. Hitler didn’t let the British escape the German 7th army is forced to reduce the pocket.

    I am so looking forward to this movie. It and Taranto have been passed over for no good reason.

    • #20
    • August 5, 2016, at 6:56 AM PST
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  21. Tom Meyer, Common Citizen Contributor

    Titus Techera: But the endings are as good as designed to rob people of their innocence.

    Go on.

    • #21
    • August 5, 2016, at 7:17 AM PST
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  22. Titus Techera Contributor

    Tom Meyer, Ed.:

    Titus Techera: But the endings are as good as designed to rob people of their innocence.

    Go on.

    I don’t have the time, Mr. Meyer, but I have dealt with the matter previously–if you have the time, take a gander:

    Mr. Nolan is a very interesting director, but he is not a Hollywood figure–he started making movies in England & his first American movie is what you might call independent, Memento. I don’t think it’s a movie Americans would like; or should like. I believe the phrase educated people use is, moral relativism. So also his first studio movie, Insomnia. These are stories that suggest there is by nature no justice. His Batman movies are, however successful, rather explicit about the debt he owes to a study of Greek tragedy, another very un-American thing. (You might want to look at his movie about magic & science, The prestige. Would not that qualify as nihilism?) Inception is like his early movies in its questioning of nature & justice, but at least seems more confident that there is some good available to human beings.

    • #22
    • August 5, 2016, at 7:29 AM PST
    • Like
  23. N.M. Wiedemer Member

    I often hear Nolan criticized for making “cold” and “aloof” movies devoid of human connection and yet I find his films to be some of the most emotionally effective movies I see made today. Especially in the era of the weepy thinkpiece/biopics that win awards these day. This may say something more about me than than his films and his critics. I find the same rift between Kubrick and his effect on me in contrast to many other viewers.

    • #23
    • August 5, 2016, at 7:40 AM PST
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  24. Eustace C. Scrubb Member

    But if not…

    • #24
    • August 5, 2016, at 7:42 AM PST
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  25. Titus Techera Contributor

    N.M. Wiedemer:I often hear Nolan criticized for making “cold” and “aloof” movies devoid of human connection and yet I find his films to be some of the most emotionally effective movies I see made today. Especially in the era of the weepy thinkpiece/biopics that win awards these day. This may say something more about me than than his films and his critics. I find the same rift between Kubrick and his effect on me in contrast to many other viewers.

    It depends on how much you like seeing human beings torn apart by tragedy-

    • #25
    • August 5, 2016, at 7:46 AM PST
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  26. N.M. Wiedemer Member

    Titus Techera:

    It depends on how much you like seeing human beings torn apart by tragedy-

    Whether one “likes” a storytelling experience is only one metric of it’s effectiveness or quality. Human beings torn apart by tragedy has been the default state of humanity since the fall of man and remains so without the divine intervention of grace. The entire old testament is the story of humans being torn apart by tragedies both of their own making and of circumstantial calamity.

    I see nihilism and fatalism pervading much of the more serious film makers these days. But not really in Nolan, most of his films are tragedies, but his characters often seem to be in a constant struggle with themselves and the fallen world that they live in. The main protagonists are often struggling for something more, something higher and more transcendent than the people around them can understand. They become tragedies however because they eventually idolize that transcendence above the people they should be prioritizing.

    • #26
    • August 5, 2016, at 8:14 AM PST
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  27. Titus Techera Contributor

    Tragedy has nothing to do with ‘circumstantial calamity.’

    The Old Testament teaches that family is the place of tragedy–as does Attic tragedy–but that faith starting in the family & issuing in law can change that. That also seems to be the teaching of the Attic tragedians.

    I would not say there is any upside of that kind to Mr. Nolan’s Memento or Insomnia or The prestige.

    A collapse of confidence pervaded the ‘more serious film-makers’ three generations back, too.

    I don’t know how many of these people think of themselves as fallen or of the world as fallen.

    As for your sketch of a plot, that seems to be the story of eros, or law-breaking. I’m not sure it’s so, but if it is, all these stories would have to be about upholding law. I’m not sure they are.

    • #27
    • August 5, 2016, at 8:27 AM PST
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  28. Profile Photo Member

    Cooper to “Dr Mann” in Interstellar: “You faked all the data?!”

    I laughed out loud in the theater.

    • #28
    • August 5, 2016, at 8:37 AM PST
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  29. Annefy Member

    BD:Cooper to “Dr Mann” in Interstellar: “You faked all the data?!”

    I laughed out loud in the theater.

    And the name Dr Mann. I am not sure Nolan chose that name on purpose but I like to think he did

    • #29
    • August 5, 2016, at 8:52 AM PST
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  30. Eustace C. Scrubb Member

    Like or love all of Nolan’s films since his first, Following. Looking forward to this. (And I love the endings of both The Prestige and Momento.)

    • #30
    • August 5, 2016, at 10:11 AM PST
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