I Don’t Have the Time to Protest

 

Does that title sound bad? I’ve always thought about that. How did people make it work, even back in the 1960s? How did they keep food on the table and clothes on their backs and protest?

I see the protesters clashing with police on TV or social media (Twitter typically) and I still feel that protesting peacefully now is lost on this generation. Many times protesters (not all) will be overly aggressive and violent towards the police and they often damage property. (Of course, this kind of protest is not new either.)

I always wonder: Why is it that people don’t realize the power in words? Instead of yelling at the police or throwing things at them or fighting with people who don’t agree with you, how about taking a microphone and a speaker and speak out against the things that you want others to take notice of?

Even still, I remember that I have a family to take care of. Yes, I’m saddened and disappointed with certain failings of different people, from those in authority to those who are regular citizens. But I have to keep a roof over my head and help my wife with the bills.

How do you manage protesting while taking care of personal responsibilities? Any “professional” protesters out there in Ricochet-land?

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  1. Josh Farnsworth Member
    Josh Farnsworth
    @

    MLH: Back in the day, protesters were really protesting and took the time and the risk to stand up for their beliefs. Friends and neighbors made sure they didn’t go hungry or unsheltered.

    So at what point does one person subsidizing the protests of the other make the other a professional protester?

    • #31
  2. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    livingthehighlife:The Thursday night protest here in Dallas was scheduled for the evening because most of the protesters have jobs.

    But I have wondered about the “professional protester”, like this Deray character who appears to be an Al Sharpton starter kit.

    Follow the money, and there the truth will be.

    EDIT: I suspect there’s a corollary between employment and the peacefulness. The protest Thursday night here in Dallas was very peaceful. Protesters were taking pictures with police officers, and by all reports everyone was friendly. And I’m willing to bet 90% or more of those in the protest had jobs.

    Good points!

    Okay….that “Deray character who appears to be an Al Sharpton starter kit” line was funny.

    • #32
  3. Mike H Coolidge
    Mike H
    @MikeH

    CandE:

    Mike H:Yes, thank you. Political protesting is a luxury and largely ineffective. People have families to feed.

    This is the same for people in 3rd-world countries. When I argue people should be allowed to immigrate here and have a much better life, often others will argue that they should stay there and “fix their own country.” But you’ve articulated perfectly why that is a ridiculous and wrong-headed suggestion.

    Why would you assume that saying that immigrants should “fix their own country” is insisting that they run protests? It seems that everyone here agrees that protests are “a luxury and largely ineffective”, and I don’t think anyone believes it will work in other countries. Unless you can show that “fix their own country” = protests, this argument is fallacious.

    -E

    Well, more generally, political activism is a luxury for a wealthy and not a moral requirement for anyone, especially people unlucky enough to be born in an impoverished and illiberal society.

    • #33
  4. a Gifted Righter Member
    a Gifted Righter
    @

    Our people are dying in the streets on a never ending basis for no reason at all and you’re worried about supporting your family and self betterment??

    Traitor!

    Massa-er- I mean the government will take care of all those minuscule and inconsequential matters, focus on the big issues; put down that book, go to your local precinct and complain about stuff.

    It’s the only way our people will get equality……or is it funding?

    maybe it’s justice or something?

    I forget but it’ll be figured out by the time you arrive.

    • #34
  5. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Merina Smith:A lot of people in this world need to hear your message: Use your words.

    Yes ma’am!!

    • #35
  6. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    a Gifted Righter:Our people are dying in the streets on a never ending basis for no reason at all and you’re worried about supporting your family and self betterment??

    Traitor!

    Massa-er- I mean the government will take care of all those minuscule and inconsequential matters, focus on the big issues; put down that book, go to your local precinct and complain about stuff.

    It’s the only way our people will get equality……or is it funding?

    maybe it’s justice or something?

    I forget but it’ll be figured out by the time you arrive.

    Please tell me that you’re joking!  My God and my family will always come before anything and everything else.

    What am I a traitor of?

    “Massa-er”??

    Put down books?  Go complain about stuff?

    • #36
  7. Matt Upton Inactive
    Matt Upton
    @MattUpton

    I feel like I’ve heard the title phrase since I was an infant. It seems to be the standard conservative reaction to any protests.

    Planned rally events are a little different. Responsible adults can set aside vacation days, plan a trip to DC, etc.

    • #37
  8. a Gifted Righter Member
    a Gifted Righter
    @

    Jerome Danner:

    a Gifted Righter:Our people are dying in the streets on a never ending basis for no reason at all and you’re worried about supporting your family and self betterment??

    Traitor!

    Massa-er- I mean the government will take care of all those minuscule and inconsequential matters, focus on the big issues; put down that book, go to your local precinct and complain about stuff.

    It’s the only way our people will get equality……or is it funding?

    maybe it’s justice or something?

    I forget but it’ll be figured out by the time you arrive.

    Please tell me that you’re joking! My God and my family will always come before anything and everything else.

    What am I a traitor of?

    “Massa-er”??

    Put down books? Go complain about stuff?

    I blame myself….

    sarcasm and the Internet? Like oil and water.

    • #38
  9. Severely Ltd. Inactive
    Severely Ltd.
    @SeverelyLtd

    Spoken like a true Conservative.

    • #39
  10. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Carol:

    Jerome Danner:

    Kate Braestrup: Otra vez no puedo venir

    Thanks for responding! You might have to get those “sensible shoes” ready. I’m not quite sure if Trump will see the White House.

    Thank you for asking. My wife and I are doing well. About 2 months and 2 weeks left until Elijah (the name that we have chosen for our son) makes his grand entrance into our world.

    I appreciate you keeping up with that. That would be interesting if Ricochet had a baby picture feature…haha!

    I demand baby pictures! ( can that count as protest?)

    I like your thinking.  I think I will create a group now, so I can remember later.  It is a joy to have a lot of you all on here who are very supportive even if we haven’t met each other.

    • #40
  11. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    a Gifted Righter:

    Jerome Danner:

    a Gifted Righter:Our people are dying in the streets on a never ending basis for no reason at all and you’re worried about supporting your family and self betterment??

    Traitor!

    Massa-er- I mean the government will take care of all those minuscule and inconsequential matters, focus on the big issues; put down that book, go to your local precinct and complain about stuff.

    It’s the only way our people will get equality……or is it funding?

    maybe it’s justice or something?

    I forget but it’ll be figured out by the time you arrive.

    Please tell me that you’re joking! My God and my family will always come before anything and everything else.

    What am I a traitor of?

    “Massa-er”??

    Put down books? Go complain about stuff?

    I blame myself….

    sarcasm and the Internet? Like oil and water.

    Oh no!  I just had to be sure!  I was going to have us continue in civil discourse.  But thank you!  Because, unfortunately, a lot of people would have said that very thing to me.

    • #41
  12. a Gifted Righter Member
    a Gifted Righter
    @

    Jerome Danner:

    a Gifted Righter:

    Jerome Danner:

    a Gifted Righter:Our people are dying in the streets on a never ending basis for no reason at all and you’re worried about supporting your family and self betterment??

    Traitor!

    Massa-er- I mean the government will take care of all those minuscule and inconsequential matters, focus on the big issues; put down that book, go to your local precinct and complain about stuff.

    It’s the only way our people will get equality……or is it funding?

    maybe it’s justice or something?

    I forget but it’ll be figured out by the time you arrive.

    Please tell me that you’re joking! My God and my family will always come before anything and everything else.

    What am I a traitor of?

    “Massa-er”??

    Put down books? Go complain about stuff?

    I blame myself….

    sarcasm and the Internet? Like oil and water.

    Oh no! I just had to be sure! I was going to have us continue in civil discourse. But thank you! Because, unfortunately, a lot of people would have said that very thing to me.

    Not here they’re not.

    I once stumbled upon the corpse of a thread belonging to some sorry soul who ranted about the good in socialism and free lunches.

    to shreds I tell you, to shreds.

    • #42
  13. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Amen!

    • #43
  14. Karen Humiston Member
    Karen Humiston
    @KarenHumiston

    My second son is turning out to be a bit of a radical.  (#wheredidIgowrong? #thistooshallpass)  Seriously, he’s joined the IWW, aka the “Wobblies — which I thought was a relic of my history books, but is apparently still around.  It seems you don’t have to be an industrial worker to be in the “Industial Workers of the World” anymore; in fact, you don’t have to be a worker at all.  My impression is that most of them work as little as they need to to support their activism.  My darling son told us that he doesn’t believe he should have to work more than thirty hours a week, because “I have a life”  and “I have more important work to do!” — this while asking us to bail him out on his rent and utility bills.  Yeah . . . no.  He is now discovering the joys of poverty.  I just hope real life knocks some sense back into his head, and convinces him that the principles his parents tried to teach him have more value than he now thinks.  And, being a mom, I hope the lesson comes soon, and not too painfully.

    • #44
  15. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Karen Humiston:My second son is turning out to be a bit of a radical. (#wheredidIgowrong? #thistooshallpass) Seriously, he’s joined the IWW, aka the “Wobblies — which I thought was a relic of my history books, but is apparently still around. It seems you don’t have to be an industrial worker to be in the “Industial Workers of the World” anymore; in fact, you don’t have to be a worker at all. My impression is that most of them work as little as they need to to support their activism. My darling son told us that he doesn’t believe he should have to work more than thirty hours a week, because “I have a life” and “I have more important work to do!” — this while asking us to bail him out on his rent and utility bills. Yeah . . . no. He is now discovering the joys of poverty. I just hope real life knocks some sense back into his head, and convinces him that the principles his parents tried to teach him have more value than he now thinks. And, being a mom, I hope the lesson comes soon, and not too painfully.

    God bless him!  It’s not like I know better than him.  But I hope he sees the weak foundation on which is building his ideology on at some point before it crashes with him still on it.

    • #45
  16. MLH Inactive
    MLH
    @MLH

    Karen Humiston:My second son is turning out to be a bit of a radical. (#wheredidIgowrong? #thistooshallpass) Seriously, he’s joined the IWW, aka the “Wobblies — which I thought was a relic of my history books, but is apparently still around. It seems you don’t have to be an industrial worker to be in the “Industial Workers of the World” anymore; in fact, you don’t have to be a worker at all. My impression is that most of them work as little as they need to to support their activism. My darling son told us that he doesn’t believe he should have to work more than thirty hours a week, because “I have a life” and “I have more important work to do!” — this while asking us to bail him out on his rent and utility bills. Yeah . . . no. He is now discovering the joys of poverty. I just hope real life knocks some sense back into his head, and convinces him that the principles his parents tried to teach him have more value than he now thinks. And, being a mom, I hope the lesson comes soon, and not too painfully.

    Did you pay his bills?

    • #46
  17. Severely Ltd. Inactive
    Severely Ltd.
    @SeverelyLtd

    Titus Techera: not even America can accommodate all comers

    That’s right, visa boy, don’t get any ideas.

    I shouldn’t worry, with all your dangerous ideas the current administration will probably have you fitted with an ankle monitor, if not leg-irons, on arrival.

    • #47
  18. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Matt Upton:I feel like I’ve heard the title phrase since I was an infant. It seems to be the standard conservative reaction to any protests.

    Planned rally events are a little different. Responsible adults can set aside vacation days, plan a trip to DC, etc.

    That’s interesting!  I can’t remember hearing the phrase, but it was just a thought to myself to provoke a conversation.

    Obviously, some protest is needed b/c it can bring attention to a worthy cause.  There are those in the pro-life movement (typically more conservative) who protest and try to get the truth out there.

    • #48
  19. Karen Humiston Member
    Karen Humiston
    @KarenHumiston

    MLH:

    Karen Humiston:My second son is turning out to be a bit of a radical. (#wheredidIgowrong? #thistooshallpass) Seriously, he’s joined the IWW, aka the “Wobblies — which I thought was a relic of my history books, but is apparently still around. It seems you don’t have to be an industrial worker to be in the “Industial Workers of the World” anymore; in fact, you don’t have to be a worker at all. My impression is that most of them work as little as they need to to support their activism. My darling son told us that he doesn’t believe he should have to work more than thirty hours a week, because “I have a life” and “I have more important work to do!” — this while asking us to bail him out on his rent and utility bills. Yeah . . . no. He is now discovering the joys of poverty. I just hope real life knocks some sense back into his head, and convinces him that the principles his parents tried to teach him have more value than he now thinks. And, being a mom, I hope the lesson comes soon, and not too painfully.

    Did you pay his bills?

    No!

    • #49
  20. Matt Upton Inactive
    Matt Upton
    @MattUpton

    Jerome Danner: That’s interesting! I can’t remember hearing the phrase, but it was just a thought to myself to provoke a conversation.

    It’s funny how independent minds can reach the same conclusions apart from each other. I don’t remember if I heard the phrase in particular, but I grew up being taught that protests were for people without jobs.

    • #50
  21. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.:When I was a kid, I remember the Iranian hostage crisis being reported on the nightly news. My dad would see the footage every day of angry mobs protesting in Tehran, and would say each time, “don’t these people have jobs?!”

    Thanks for sharing that little anecdote!

    • #51
  22. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    I read a very good book years ago by former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young called A Way Out of No Way

    http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1707328.A_Way_Out_of_No_Way

    Jerome, back in the days even before the Civil Rights movement, African American families had two parents, both usually worked and had hard manual labor jobs. They stressed homework and school and church – you helped around the house – there was no time or reason to be self-focused.  They wanted a better life for their children – fast forward to today – the problems you describe are rampant throughout culture.  My neighbor owns a restaurant and pays dishwashers 11-13 per hr and can’t keep people – they quit and say its too little for hard work – cooks at $20 quit for four hours cooking per evening – people are hooked on hard drugs – there’s no faith and households are usually single parent. This is the problem. The elderly had it hard but they lived to talk about it – today everyone wants it easy or free – no working your way up and providing for your kids.

    • #52
  23. Weeping Inactive
    Weeping
    @Weeping

    Karen Humiston: My darling son told us that he doesn’t believe he should have to work more than thirty hours a week, because “I have a life” and “I have more important work to do!” — this while asking us to bail him out on his rent and utility bills. Yeah . . . no.

    Did you manage to not laugh until after the conversation was over? If so, you’re a better mother than I, because I’m not sure I could have.

    I’ve said before I don’t mind helping my kids out once they’re adults if they need help and we have the ability to help them. Ideally, that’s what families are for – to help each other out when needed.

    But all bets are off if the reason the kid needs help is simply because he doesn’t want to work enough hours in order to be able to pay the bills himself – especially if the time required would only be around 40 hours a week. You can’t pay your bills because you don’t want to work? That’s an entirely different kettle of fish.

    • #53
  24. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Matt Upton:

    Jerome Danner: That’s interesting! I can’t remember hearing the phrase, but it was just a thought to myself to provoke a conversation.

    It’s funny how independent minds can reach the same conclusions apart from each other. I don’t remember if I heard the phrase in particular, but I grew up being taught that protests were for people without jobs.

    That is so interesting!

    And I try not to be on the extreme, you know?  So, I know it can be good, but it’s the way that it is done by some that bother me -> http://ricochet.com/the-wrong-kind-of-protest/.

    • #54
  25. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    My first protest was to convince the University of Illinois to divest from South Africa some time in 1978.

    There was a girl involved. Nothing happened; the University didn’t drop everything and divest, and the girl dumped me for a Marxist whose daddy had bought him a nice car.

    My second protest was a Tea Party rally 41 years later.

    • #55
  26. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Weeping:

    Karen Humiston: My darling son told us that he doesn’t believe he should have to work more than thirty hours a week, because “I have a life” and “I have more important work to do!” — this while asking us to bail him out on his rent and utility bills. Yeah . . . no.

    Did you manage to not laugh until after the conversation was over? If so, you’re a better mother than I, because I’m not sure I could have.

    I’ve said before I don’t mind helping my kids out once they’re adults if they need help and we have the ability to help them. Ideally, that’s what families are for – to help each other out when needed.

    But all bets are off if the reason the kid needs help is simply because he doesn’t want to work enough hours in order to be able to pay the bills himself – especially if the time required would only be around 40 hours a week. You can’t pay your bills because you don’t want to work? That’s an entirely different kettle of fish.

    Amen!

    • #56
  27. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Percival:My first protest was to convince the University of Illinois to divest from South Africa some time in 1978.

    There was a girl involved. Nothing happened; the University didn’t drop everything and divest, and the girl dumped me for a Marxist whose daddy had bought him a nice car.

    My second protest was a Tea Party rally 41 years later.

    Thank you for the story!

    • #57
  28. Jerome Danner Inactive
    Jerome Danner
    @JeromeDanner

    Front Seat Cat:I read a very good book years ago by former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young called A Way Out of No Way

    http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1707328.A_Way_Out_of_No_Way

    Jerome, back in the days even before the Civil Right movement, African American families had two parents, both usually worked and had hard manual labor jobs. They stressed homework and school and church – you helped around the house – there was no time or reason to be self-focused. They wanted a better life for their children – fast forward to today – the problems you describe are rampant throughout culture. My neighbor owns a restaurant and pays dishwashers 11-13 per hr and can’t keep people – they quit and say its too little for hard work – cooks at $20 quit for hour hours cooking – people are hooked on hard drugs – there’s no faith and households are usually single parent. This is the problem. The elderly had it hard but they lived to talk about it – today everyone wants it easy or free – no working your way up and providing for your kids.

    Thanks for sharing the book and thanks for leaving a comment.  By the way, I totally agree.  A lot of issues that we face as a country start from the lack of strong fathers with a strong faith in and building up strong wives in strong families.

    • #58
  29. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    I joined the Vietnam protests – I was very young and had no clue about what I was doing – it was an excuse to cut school and when my dad found out, there were consequences!

    • #59
  30. CB Toder aka Mama Toad Member
    CB Toder aka Mama Toad
    @CBToderakaMamaToad

    I attended my first protest in about 1974, when I was still a toddler, with my mother, when the State of New York closed the maternity wing of St. Francis Hospital (which has since been closed completely by NYS) because the Catholic hospital would not perform abortions of duplication of services in the area.

    Since then, I have attended many protests and prayer vigils. My tadpoles (I have six children) grew up praying outside the local Planned Parenthood and decorating the sidewalk with chalk and messages of love.

    I’m not a professional protester. I don’t have the time to protest, but I believe I have a duty to do so.

    • #60
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