A Fifth Indiana Jones Movie Slated for 2019

 
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Old Indy from “The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles”

“It’s not the years, honey, it’s the mileage”:

Indiana Jones will return to the big screen on July 19, 2019, for a fifth epic adventure in the blockbuster series. Steven Spielberg, who directed all four previous films, will helm the as-yet-untitled project with star Harrison Ford reprising his iconic role. Franchise veterans Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall will produce.

“Indiana Jones is one of the greatest heroes in cinematic history, and we can’t wait to bring him back to the screen in 2019,” said Alan Horn, Chairman, The Walt Disney Studios. “It’s rare to have such a perfect combination of director, producers, actor and role, and we couldn’t be more excited to embark on this adventure with Harrison and Steven.”

Famed archaeologist and explorer Indiana Jones was introduced in 1981’s Raiders of the Lost Ark – one of AFI’s 100 Greatest American Films of All Time – and later thrilled audiences in 1984’s Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, 1989’s Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, and 2008’s Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. The four films have brought in nearly $2 billion at the global box office.

Ummm, yeah. So … we all love Harrison Ford (at least those of us over 40) but in the last Star Wars movie, Han Solo looked like a character in a late-night ad on Fox News. When the new Indy is released in 2019, the actor will be 77 years old.

Unless they’re naming it Indiana Jones and the Pain-Free Catheter, maybe Spielberg should just have him look for the Fountain of Youth and do the whole thing as a spoof.

What do you think, Ricochetti? Is this fifth Indy film a bad idea or the worst idea ever?

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  1. Jamie Lockett Inactive
    Jamie Lockett
    @JamieLockett

    Indiana Jones and the Search for the Social Security Trust Fund.

    • #1
  2. Salvatore Padula Inactive
    Salvatore Padula
    @SalvatorePadula

    As long as Shia Labeouf and aliens don’t make an appearance I remain hopeful.

    • #2
  3. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    In 1977 Bing Crosby and Bob Hope signed on to do an eighth “Road” picture entitled “The Road to the Fountain of Youth.” Six months later Crosby was dead. Be careful what you sign up for…

    • #3
  4. Rick B. Member
    Rick B.
    @

    The first movie was a classic (obviously).

    The second movie was good.

    The third movie was better and funny as well.

    I have not seen the fourth (heard mixed reviews)

    Harrison Ford looked good (for his age) in the new Star Wars film.  I think he is getting to old to carry this type of movie.

    • #4
  5. Tom Meyer, Ed. Contributor
    Tom Meyer, Ed.
    @tommeyer

    Salvatore Padula:

    As long as Shia Labeouf and aliens don’t make an appearance I remain hopeful.

    So little to ask… and yet so much.

    • #5
  6. Mate De Inactive
    Mate De
    @MateDe

    This is why Hollywood is horrible, doing ANOTHER Indiana Jones. All they do these days are reboots, and Comic book movies.

    • #6
  7. Quinn the Eskimo Member
    Quinn the Eskimo
    @

    Just tell a good story and go a lot easier on the CGI.  I hope that’s not too much to ask.

    Even if it’s too much to ask, I’m still asking.

    • #7
  8. C. U. Douglas Thatcher
    C. U. Douglas
    @CUDouglas

    Tom Meyer, Ed.:

    Salvatore Padula:

    As long as Shia Labeouf and aliens don’t make an appearance I remain hopeful.

    So little to ask… and yet so much.

    From what I understand, number four was supposed to set up Shia as Indy Jr., a sort of baton-passing that didn’t work out as well as hoped. If five is to succeed, there needs to be an attempt at this again, and Harrison Ford would perhaps best serve as Sean Connery did in the third, the experienced scholar who advises and criticizes.

    The trick is finding someone that can take the baton and who won’t enrage the audience which can be a trick nowadays.

    • #8
  9. The King Prawn Inactive
    The King Prawn
    @TheKingPrawn

    hansolo

    • #9
  10. Son of Spengler Contributor
    Son of Spengler
    @SonofSpengler

    Wake me when someone makes a new movie that’s not from a comic book or a 1980s franchise.

    • #10
  11. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    They’re currently looking at three possible candidates to play young Han Solo in the Star Wars spinoff flick. Maybe they’ll do a two-fer and get the winner to play young Indy as well?

    But really, just give it up with the Indy movies.

    Continuing on with Star Wars makes sense because it’s an entire fictional galaxy for writers to play in. There are plenty of different stories one can tell in that paradigm.

    Indy, by contrast, is really limited to a particular time and setting.  It’s past its best-before date.

    • #11
  12. Spicy Food Hiccups Inactive
    Spicy Food Hiccups
    @SpicyFoodHiccups

    Let’s hope there isn’t another attempt at passing the baton, because they probably will choose…poorly.

    • #12
  13. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    Rebrand and reboot: Arizona Jones and the Raiders of the Retirement Community.

    Our intrepid hero is on a quest to recover the legendary “blue pill” stolen from the infirmary of the Del Webb Dove Mountain. The suspect is a bearded man always seen with a coffee cup pressed to his lips…

    • #13
  14. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    It could work, but it would take more imagination than Hollywood has today.

    Have Harrison Ford play Indiana Jones at age 77. Give the character professor emeritus status and set the movie in the late 1960s, early 1970s. Show him as out of step with the new generation of students who know the answers to everything (the wrong answers of course), and figure he is past it. And then set it up so he proves them wrong (but really needs a lot of Ben-Gay at the end of the day).

    It will never happen, but it could be great.

    Seawriter

    • #14
  15. Pelayo Inactive
    Pelayo
    @Pelayo

    Is it really that hard for Hollywood studios to come up with an original idea?  When I read California was in a drought I did not realize they were referring to original movie scripts.

    Is Indy going to escape from the bad guys in a wheelchair?

    And they wonder why Deadpool was a success…

    • #15
  16. Jim Chase Member
    Jim Chase
    @JimChase

    There are certain franchises, I suppose, that need new stories to appeal to new generations.

    There are some however, that should be good enough to stand on their own across generations.  So what if they are “dated”, anchored by the era in which they were made?

    There is no other Indiana Jones, and his time has passed.  And as Henry Jones, Sr. said to Henry Jones, Jr. in the 3rd movie:  “Indiana, let it go.”

    Mr. Spielberg, let it go.

    • #16
  17. skipsul Inactive
    skipsul
    @skipsul

    Jumped the shark.

    Nuked the fridge.

    We saw Crystal Snore at home on a DVD borrowed (for free) from the library.  After suffering through it, I turned to my wife and said “I want my money back.”

    “But it was free at the library.”

    “Then I want those hours of my life back.”

    I’d link to how South Park reacted, but, well, that entire episode is entirely unsuited to a main feed thread.

    • #17
  18. C. U. Douglas Thatcher
    C. U. Douglas
    @CUDouglas

    There’s been a lot of 80’s nostalgia that’s come up from Hollywood. The idea is that my generation loved these things, and so we’ll love to see them in film.

    Problem is, the younger generations don’t care about this stuff as much as we do, and my generation is pretty dadgum cynical (and rightly so) about Hollywood’s ability to recreate our fond memories on screen.

    Let’s face it, nostalgia just isn’t what it used to be.

    • #18
  19. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    Pelayo: Is it really that hard for Hollywood studios to come up with an original idea?

    No, it isn’t. Hollywood studios give original ideas a shot, again, and again.

    They tank.

    It’s hard for audiences to take a chance on buying tickets to see original ideas.

    There is a second, less well-known part to Marshall McLuhen’s famous maxim, “the medium is the message.” He also said, “the content is the audience.”

    • #19
  20. skipsul Inactive
    skipsul
    @skipsul

    C. U. Douglas:There’s been a lot of 80’s nostalgia that’s come up from Hollywood. The idea is that my generation loved these things, and so we’ll love to see them in film.

    Problem is, the younger generations don’t care about this stuff as much as we do, and my generation is pretty dadgum cynical (and rightly so) about Hollywood’s ability to recreate our fond memories on screen.

    Let’s face it, nostalgia just isn’t what it used to be.

    Well, it makes up for suffering through 60s and 70s nostalgia crud when we were growing up.  Time to make the next generation as disgusted and bored with us as we were with our forebears.

    • #20
  21. C. U. Douglas Thatcher
    C. U. Douglas
    @CUDouglas

    skipsul:

    C. U. Douglas:There’s been a lot of 80’s nostalgia that’s come up from Hollywood. The idea is that my generation loved these things, and so we’ll love to see them in film.

    Problem is, the younger generations don’t care about this stuff as much as we do, and my generation is pretty dadgum cynical (and rightly so) about Hollywood’s ability to recreate our fond memories on screen.

    Let’s face it, nostalgia just isn’t what it used to be.

    Well, it makes up for suffering through 60s and 70s nostalgia crud when we were growing up. Time to make the next generation as disgusted and bored with us as we were with our forebears.

    I don’t mind that they had great experiences, but I swear you’d think the universe began with Woodstock. Actually with some, I suspect that’s as far as they can remember …

    • #21
  22. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    C. U. Douglas:There’s been a lot of 80’s nostalgia that’s come up from Hollywood. The idea is that my generation loved these things, and so we’ll love to see them in film.

    Problem is, the younger generations don’t care about this stuff as much as we do, and my generation is pretty dadgum cynical (and rightly so) about Hollywood’s ability to recreate our fond memories on screen.

    Let’s face it, nostalgia just isn’t what it used to be.

    Of course it isn’t. For nostalgia to work it has to be tailored to the prime ticket-buying demographic of that particular moment.

    That means that 80s nostalgia has already passed its prime. The people who remember the 80s fondly have aged out of the movie-going target demographic.

    Now is the time for 90s nostalgia. That’s why they remade Point Break.

    Heck, one could argue that the current Star Wars rebirth is as much 90s nostalgia as it is 70s or 80s nostalgia. After all, The Phantom Menace was released way back in 1999.

    • #22
  23. skipsul Inactive
    skipsul
    @skipsul

    I am also reminded of a Big Bang Theory episode about Indy.  The entire sub plot revolved around debating whether Indy was even necessary to the plot.

    • #23
  24. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    You know who would make a great new Indiana Jones and friend? Chuck and Sarah from Chuck.

    • #24
  25. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    skipsul:I am also reminded of a Big Bang Theory episode about Indy. The entire sub plot revolved around debating whether Indy was even necessary to the plot.

    He’s only necessary to the plot of Temple Of Doom. In Raiders and Holy Grail the villains would have been destroyed regardless of Indy’s actions. The endings of those movies are literally deus ex machina.

    • #25
  26. Valiuth Inactive
    Valiuth
    @Valiuth

    Another reason that the Trump Presidency will be terrible.

    • #26
  27. Douglas Inactive
    Douglas
    @Douglas

    Son of Spengler:Wake me when someone makes a new movie that’s not from a comic book or a 1980s franchise.

    That leaves you with cross-dressing and bear-rape flicks. Enjoy.

    • #27
  28. Tom Meyer, Ed. Contributor
    Tom Meyer, Ed.
    @tommeyer

    Son of Spengler:Wake me when someone makes a new movie that’s not from a comic book or a 1980s franchise.

    Sleep well.

    • #28
  29. Brian Watt Inactive
    Brian Watt
    @BrianWatt

    “Throw me my walker!”

    “Throw me the idol; and I’ll throw you your walker.”

    • #29
  30. C. U. Douglas Thatcher
    C. U. Douglas
    @CUDouglas

    Spicy Food Hiccups:Let’s hope there isn’t another attempt at passing the baton, because they probably will choose…poorly.

    Actually, it’s absolutely necessary to maintain the franchise’s survival. Anything that’s crossed generations has been willing to pass that baton on to the next one way or another.

    James Bond just recast the parts and pretended it was the same guy.

    Dr. Who just recast the parts and wrote in that it was the same guy with different buddies in the script.

    Star Trek just focused on different crews.

    Star Wars used previous generations and now new generations.

    Baton-passing is a time honored story tradition. Yes, it can be totally screwed up and has been (See Indy 4), but it can totally work as well and should be done with that in mind.

    • #30
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