Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. In Silent Defense of a Fragile God

 

Woodlawn (crop)It was just after 1 PM when I snapped. There was nothing unusual about the day; it was the same as any other Friday in my work-a-day life. But maybe that was the problem. Maybe it was the very ordinariness of the day, the sheer bearability of it, that made it so unbearable. I couldn’t go on. I couldn’t continue to sit there, playing by their rules, like nothing was wrong. I had to leave. I had to get far, far away from that drab prison, with its e-mails, and its production reports, and its soul-rending conformity. I had to break free. I had to run. I told no one. I just walked off the job without a word, drove to a sticky-floored old movie theater on the edge of town, and bought a ticket for 124 minutes of something like escape.

It is the frayed edge of the tapestry of life that is on display Friday afternoons at the cineplex. There are the young, the truant scofflaws, who should be in school learning how to reduce fractions, chat up girls, and process grief, but have slipped the leash for a few hours and have come here to hide out. There are the old, the refugees from a wakeful death, who boarded the convalescent home short bus, destination unknown, just to taste the fresh air, just to feel the sun, and were deposited here, at the old movie house, where the air is stale and the sun never shines. And then there’s me, somewhere in between: grim harbinger to the young, patient understudy to the old, faceless worker who just couldn’t take another minute.

Together, we are the Anarcho-Cinemalists, united in our impotent midday defiance, our shared moment of empty freedom in the flickering darkness, and our passionate love of Mike-and-Ikes.

Whaddya think, guys? A little too heavy for a post about a sports movie? Yeah, you’re probably right. It’s a post on a group blog, not the lost sequel to Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury.

Which few people know was called The Sound and the Furious: Tokyo Drift.

Let’s get on with this.

*****

Woodlawn is the true story of the forced integration of a Birmingham high school in the 1970s, as told through the prism of its football team. Sean Astin (Samwise Gamgee in The Lord of the Rings; Rudy Ruettiger in Rudy) stars as Hank, a motivational speaker whose message unites the racially divided team and sparks a movement that forever changes race relations, not just at Woodlawn High, but in the entire city of Birmingham.

Astin is joined by veteran actor Nic Bishop, playing skeptical head coach Tandy Gerelds. Gerelds is slow to embrace the change he sees around him, suspicious in the way adults so often are of messages that resonate with a younger generation. Newcomer Caleb Castille plays Tony Nathan, the African-American football player who lives out Hank’s radical message of hope, even at great personal risk to himself and his family. Academy Award-winner Jon Voight plays Bear Bryant, the legendary Alabama coach who aggressively recruits Nathan, hoping he will bring his football talent and inspirational message of brotherhood and change to the still segregated Crimson Tide.

Woodlawn is well-shot in a consistent style. Directors Andrew and Jon Erwin are able to capture the inherent urgency of on-field sports action without rendering it frenetic or disconnected. The soundtrack is a bit on the nose, but it still offers the sound of 1970s America, a necessary complement to the period look and feel of Woodlawn. A tighter story would have allowed for a deeper exploration of the central characters; a more nuanced portrait of main character Tony Nathan would have added to the poignancy of an already moving story. All together, Woodlawn is an enjoyable, uplifting film. Definitely worth seeing. Two thumbs up.

In case you couldn’t tell, dear reader, that was my best impression of a movie critic. I love movies as much as the next guy; probably more so. But I don’t have the knowledge of movie history or the grasp of cinematic nuance that a professional film critic has. I really did enjoy Woodlawn, and I wish I could provide you with a link to a proper review written by a talented film critic whose insight and perspective would do the movie justice.* But I’m the best you’re gonna get, because no one in the legitimate film press has bothered to write so much as a paragraph about Woodlawn.

This is unusual. Movies in wide release never go completely unreviewed by the Hollywood press. If this were an obscure student film being screened on the side of a barn outside Norman, OK, or a seven-hour art house exploration of the tantric sexuality of Boston ferns, I would understand. But we’re talking about a movie showing five times a day, every day, on more than 1,500 screens from Boise to Key Biscayne. We’re talking about a movie starring an Oscar winner and everybody’s favorite hobbit, with a subject matter fetishized by every Hollywood writer this side of William Rose, but I can’t find a single review written by anyone more qualified than me. How is this possible?

*****

Ohh, I’m such a lousy movie reviewer; I forgot to mention something important about Woodlawn. Woodlawn is a Christian movie. I mean really Christian. There are no scenes, none, that fail to mention the transformative power of Christian faith. By the end of the movie — ahem, spoiler alert — everybody has converted to evangelical Christianity. The coach of the rival football team, Nathan’s Black Panther girlfriend, the long snapper, everybody. It’s Jesus, Jesus, Jesus; pillar to post, Jesus; two solid hours of Jesus. They could have called the movie Jesus Presents: Woodlawn! and it still would not have conveyed just how much Jesus you’re gonna get if you watch this movie.

The implication is as clear as it is tragic: Hollywood won’t acknowledge Woodlawn because it is unabashedly, unironically, unapologetically Christian.

Mel Gibson once told me that there is a cabal of militant atheist movie critics who meet in an Upper West Side deli and conspire to keep explicitly Christian movies like Woodlawn from ever reaching a mainstream audience.** I am not one to question Mel (he says mean things when he gets angry), so I am entirely open to the possibility that Hollywood is actively attempting to marginalize all things Christian. But at the risk of incurring Mel’s awesome wrath, there is a problem with that theory:

Here are 25 reviews from the mainstream press for last year’s Son of God. And here are another 25 for the Nic Cage rapture thriller Left Behind (which, by all accounts, should have, indeed, been left behind). And here are 39 for the Chronicles of Narnia. And 27 for Heaven is Real. And, of course, here are 43 for Mel’s own Passion of the Christ. I’ll even give you 20 for Jonah: A VeggieTales Movie and nine for that cinematic tour-de-force, Kirk Cameron’s Saving Christmas. And finally, here are 24 reviews for last August’s When the Game Stands Tall, another movie about high school football, dripping with religion, and starring none other than Jesus Himself.

Okay fine, not the actual Jesus; Jesus’ stunt double, Jim Caviezel. But you get the point.

Yes, the Hollywood press hates your Bible-reading guts. But they aren’t at all shy about telling you what they think of you. There have been hundreds of mainstream reviews of Christian movies published just this year, most of which are witheringly critical, no doubt partly animated by a naked hostility to religious values. But hostile though they may be, those reviews were published. Every time Christianity dares to rise above the subtext in a film set for wide release, Hollywood lets loose on it, with both godless and cynical barrels smoking.

But for Woodlawn, the critics are the dog that didn’t bark. They aren’t savaging Woodlawn. They could. It is crushing in its heavy-handedness and at times embarrassingly simplistic in its aww-shucks brand of Christianity. If I were a failed screenwriter arrogant enough to think other people wanted to read my review of a movie I wasn’t talented enough to make myself (hey, wait…), I could have written a damning review on my iPhone before even leaving the theater. Hollywood undoubtedly hates Woodlawn with the incandescent passion it usually reserves for overfrothed lattes and Katherine Heigl, but … nothing. No one will touch Woodlawn.

*****

I’m really such an awful, awful movie reviewer. That review just didn’t do Woodlawn justice. Would you mind if I try again?

Woodlawn is a searing civil rights movie, depicting a world of hate and violence without hope. Based on a true story, the film opens on a black screen with a quote from the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King. It takes us through footage of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, painting a grim picture of 1970s Birmingham as a burning cauldron of unchecked racial animus. Then it makes the hate from the old footage real by showing that the same homicidal violence that killed four young girls at 16th Street Baptist has come to the steps of recently-integrated Woodlawn High. Woodlawn, like all of Birmingham, is on the edge of the abyss, angry and frightened, waiting for the spark they know is coming.

Into this Hell steps Hank Erwin (the real-life father of Woodlawn directors Andrew and Jon Erwin). Hank has no special training; he isn’t an expert on race. He is just an ordinary man who went to a revival meeting in Dallas where the Christian message of hope and universal brotherhood affected him so deeply that he wants to share what he learned with the players on the Woodlawn football team. At first, the coach won’t let him — the cynical authority figure standing between real hearts and the truth. But when the coach relents, Hank’s message cuts through the hate in a way nothing else could. In a school, in a city, beyond hope, Hank’s message of love and unity rooted in simple Christian faith pulls Woodlawn and Birmingham back from the edge and puts them on a path to healing and real change.

Rated PG, with scenes of racial violence and adult language. Starring Sean Astin, Nic Bishop, Caleb Castille, C. Thomas Howell, Sherri Shepherd, and Jon Voight. Directed by Andrew and Jon Erwin. Provident Films. Runtime 124 minutes.

Okay, now I get it; now it makes sense. Now I see why a movie with a $25 million budget and bankable stars being released in the opening weeks of Oscar season and showing on 1,500 screens across the nation has been reviewed less times that Kirk Cameron’s Saving Christmas.

Woodlawn is, at its essence, a film about the impotence of a godless society as it struggles to confront the issue at the very core of the modern liberal creed — race. It is the all-too-true story of a time when our shared government failed us, but our common faith saved us. The Birmingham government, the Alabama government, the federal government, could do nothing to heal the racial divide and stop the violence. Hope was only possible, change was only possible, when an ordinary man with a Bible had the courage to defy the authorities and speak of a higher truth.

They’ll let you have your religion. They’ll mock you for it; they’ll profit from it; then when they’re done with it, they’ll let you have it. But they have their god, too; a god they will defend with the same ferocity with which you will defend yours. But theirs is a fragile god. And when confronted with a moving story, beautifully told, of a dark time when their god failed them, it is a god whose honor they can only defend with their silence.

* — After this was written, three short reviews of Woodlawn, one each from Variety, The Hollywood Reporter, and the Los Angeles Times, were published. Major releases are typically reviewed by between 30 and 50 mainstream film critics, with most reviews published the week prior to the film’s release.

** — I was going to make a joke about the Skull and Bones Society and the Freemasons holding a secret summit at the Build-a-Burger in the Johnstown Galleria Food Court in Johnstown, PA, but I just found out that the Johnstown Build-a-Burger is “temporarily closed.” A quick search of the Internet reveals there are no restaurants in the entire United States with a name appropriate for this joke. There is no Illuminachos. There is no Fry-Lateral Commission. There is no Rosicrustaceans. There is no Knights Tempura. This is not an accident, my friends.

There are 40 comments.

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  1. Songwriter Member
    Songwriter Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Thanks for this post. I recently spent two years writing a commissioned faith-based musical that was (hopefully) entertaining without being preachy. I have “pie-in-the sky” hopes that the show might some day become a made-for-TV holiday movie. (Anybody from the Hallmark Channel reading this?) If that ever happens, I wonder if I would prefer the show to be skewered by critics or ignored altogether? Which is worse?

    • #1
    • October 21, 2015, at 7:54 AM PDT
    • Like
  2. Fredösphere Member
    Fredösphere Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Whoa. That final footnote. WHOA.

    • #2
    • October 21, 2015, at 9:04 AM PDT
    • Like
  3. Vance Richards Member
    Vance Richards Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I saw Woodlawn over the weekend. I liked it. I liked it a lot. Jesus and football, the only two things in life that really matter (yeah, yeah . . . wife, kids, blah blah blah).

    The transformations you see in the movie would seem unbelievable if it were not for the fact that this is a true story. And the Erwin brothers used to work at ESPN, so they clearly knew how to film the football scenes.

    And I remember Tony Nathan from his years with the Dolphins (my friend would always be the Dolphins when we played Strat-O-Matic). Nathan is now protecting one of the O-Linemen who blocked for him back in Miami.

    • #3
    • October 21, 2015, at 10:03 AM PDT
    • Like
  4. Concretevol Thatcher

    Garrett sir, I’m not one to judge if you are a competent movie reviewer but you are a damn fine Ricochet poster. Really enjoyed your take and am looking forward to seeing the movie. 70’s Birmingham, right or wrong, symbolizes all of the south during that period of change to the rest of the country. Normally I run the other way from Hollywood’s portrayal of that time, not because of the subject matter but from the lazy use of caricatures with a southern accent.

    ps. I wouldn’t cross Mel Gibson in person either. :)

    • #4
    • October 21, 2015, at 3:30 PM PDT
    • Like
  5. Trinity Waters Inactive

    What a refreshing post! Much of the time we get pugnacious and nuanced blather about politics, a necessary evil. This post was truly a breath of fresh air. It almost didn’t matter what the topic or message was, the writing was so engaging and somehow comforting. Well done, Garret.

    • #5
    • October 21, 2015, at 4:01 PM PDT
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  6. Autistic License Thatcher

    Outstanding, sir. Penetrating and so well-written!

    • #6
    • October 21, 2015, at 4:01 PM PDT
    • Like
  7. Concretevol Thatcher

    Tom Riehl:What a refreshing post! Much of the time we get pugnacious and nuanced blather about politics, a necessary evil. This post was truly a breath of fresh air. It almost didn’t matter what the topic or message was, the writing was so engaging and somehow comforting. Well done, Garret.

    I think this is what I intended my comment to say but I did a poor job of it. Well done, yes…

    • #7
    • October 21, 2015, at 4:16 PM PDT
    • Like
  8. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Where’s the danged “Like” this post button?!

    /she asks for the eleventy billionth time since December 2010.

    Dear Lord, man, if you’re not getting paid to write somewhere, it’s a sin. Another fabulous post.

    • #8
    • October 21, 2015, at 4:44 PM PDT
    • Like
  9. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Songwriter:Thanks for this post. I recently spent two years writing a commissioned faith-based musical that was (hopefully) entertaining without being preachy. I have “pie-in-the sky” hopes that the show might some day become a made-for-TV holiday movie. (Anybody from the Hallmark Channel reading this?) If that ever happens, I wonder if I would prefer the show to be skewered by critics or ignored altogether? Which is worse?

    A bespoke faith-based musical by one of the Ricochet faithful? This has to be the centerpiece of the next Meetup. I volunteer to play Jesus.

    • #9
    • October 21, 2015, at 5:41 PM PDT
    • Like
  10. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Fredösphere:Whoa. That final footnote. WHOA.

    I don’t know about you, but I fear for my freedom … fries.

    • #10
    • October 21, 2015, at 5:46 PM PDT
    • Like
  11. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Vance Richards:I saw Woodlawn over the weekend. I liked it. I liked it a lot. Jesus and football, the only two things in life that really matter (yeah, yeah . . . wife, kids, blah blah blah).

    The transformations you see in the movie would seem unbelievable if it were not for the fact that this is a true story. And the Erwin brothers used to work at ESPN, so they clearly knew how to film the football scenes.

    And I remember Tony Nathan from his years with the Dolphins (my friend would always be the Dolphins when we played Strat-O-Matic). Nathan is now protecting one of the O-Linemen who blocked for him back in Miami.

    Jesus and football … in no particular order.

    • #11
    • October 21, 2015, at 5:47 PM PDT
    • Like
  12. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Concretevol:Normally I run the other way from Hollywood’s portrayal of that time, not because of the subject matter but from the lazy use of caricatures with a southern accent.

    Interesting you should say that. To get 2,000 words (or so) that are borderline coherent, I usually write about double that, then slash the sections that just aren’t quite worthy of y’all. In the first run, this post had a lengthy section on how the Right — particularly the Southern Right — struggles to engage on race issues, occasionally for morally dubious reasons, but usually just to avoid being yelled at.

    But I couldn’t find a way to make it funny, so I junked it. :)

    • #12
    • October 21, 2015, at 5:58 PM PDT
    • Like
  13. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Tom Riehl:What a refreshing post! Much of the time we get pugnacious and nuanced blather about politics, a necessary evil. This post was truly a breath of fresh air. It almost didn’t matter what the topic or message was, the writing was so engaging and somehow comforting. Well done, Garret.

    Concretevol:

    Tom Riehl:What a refreshing post! Much of the time we get pugnacious and nuanced blather about politics, a necessary evil. This post was truly a breath of fresh air. It almost didn’t matter what the topic or message was, the writing was so engaging and somehow comforting. Well done, Garret.

    I think this is what I intended my comment to say but I did a poor job of it. Well done, yes…

    Thanks, gents; I appreciate it.

    I feel the same way about the pugnacious political blather. Obviously, an explicitly, unapologetically conservative website is going to have its share of political coverage. But there is much more to conservatism that a list of Reagan-approved policy positions and Ricochet needs to address the non-political aspects of our common creed as well as the political.

    • #13
    • October 21, 2015, at 6:03 PM PDT
    • Like
  14. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Western Chauvinist:Where’s the danged “Like” this post button?!

    /she asks for the eleventy billionth time since December 2010.

    Dear Lord, man, if you’re not getting paid to write somewhere, it’s a sin. Another fabulous post.

    How nice of you to say. Rob Long pays me in hugs and that’s quite enough for me.

    • #14
    • October 21, 2015, at 6:05 PM PDT
    • Like
  15. Percival Thatcher
    Percival Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    No Order of the Nibbles of the Mystic Shrine?

    • #15
    • October 21, 2015, at 6:09 PM PDT
    • Like
  16. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    No Hermetic Order of the Golden Bun. No Fryery of Sion. There used to be an Opus Deli in Montana. But of course, they closed it.

    • #16
    • October 21, 2015, at 6:30 PM PDT
    • Like
  17. Dustoff Inactive

    Nice work sir. I’d read a movie review or heck, a restaurant review by you any old time. Thanks. I plan to see the film, Jesus and all, soon.

    • #17
    • October 21, 2015, at 11:17 PM PDT
    • Like
  18. Matt Balzer, Imperialist Claw Member

    Garret Hobart: Which few people know was called The Sound and the Furious: Tokyo Drift.

    I knew that, I just didn’t think I could work it into a Ricochet post. Excellently done, sir.

    • #18
    • October 22, 2015, at 12:44 AM PDT
    • Like
  19. Hank Rhody, Badgeless Bandito Contributor

    I may have to consult my Faulkner, but I think you’re getting them out of order. The second one was definitely 2 Sound, 2 Furious.

    • #19
    • October 22, 2015, at 4:57 AM PDT
    • Like
  20. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Dustoff:Nice work sir.I’d read a movie review or heck, a restaurant review by you any old time.Thanks.I plan to see the film, Jesus and all, soon.

    Restaurant reviews, huh? Next week, five thousands words on how the new Chicken Slider at Arby’s changed my life.

    • #20
    • October 22, 2015, at 5:26 AM PDT
    • Like
  21. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Matt Balzer:

    Garret Hobart: Which few people know was called The Sound and the Furious: Tokyo Drift.

    I knew that, I just didn’t think I could work it into a Ricochet post. Excellently done, sir.

    Hank Rhody:I may have to consult my Faulkner, but I think you’re getting them out of order. The second one was definitely 2 Sound, 2 Furious.

    As one of America’s leading cross-disciplinary experts on the careers of William Faulkner and Vin Deisel, I refuse to acknowledge any adaptation of the former that doesn’t star the latter.

    • #21
    • October 22, 2015, at 5:34 AM PDT
    • Like
  22. Dick from Brooklyn Thatcher
    Dick from Brooklyn Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Spectacular.

    • #22
    • October 22, 2015, at 5:35 AM PDT
    • Like
  23. Concretevol Thatcher

    Garret Hobart: In the first run, this post had a lengthy section on how the Right — particularly the Southern Right — struggles to engage on race issues, occasionally for morally dubious reasons, but usually just to avoid being yelled at.

    There was some decent discussion around here during the whole “confederate flag” debate after the shooting in Charleston…..nationally, not so much. I think I would revise your statement somewhat because I don’t see it as a struggle for the “Southern Right” as much as just the “South”. The political Left however tends to get off the hook by dishonest pandering so I guess they have succeeded making it about the “Right”. Interesting bit of amnesia that the Dems completely controlled the South during segregation.

    • #23
    • October 22, 2015, at 6:14 AM PDT
    • Like
  24. Songwriter Member
    Songwriter Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Garret Hobart:

    Songwriter:Thanks for this post. I recently spent two years writing a commissioned faith-based musical that was (hopefully) entertaining without being preachy. I have “pie-in-the sky” hopes that the show might some day become a made-for-TV holiday movie. (Anybody from the Hallmark Channel reading this?) If that ever happens, I wonder if I would prefer the show to be skewered by critics or ignored altogether? Which is worse?

    A bespoke faith-based musical by one of the Ricochet faithful? This has to be the centerpiece of the next Meetup. I volunteer to play Jesus.

    Although I’ve written several with Jesus as a central character, this particular musical is based on Dickens characters – so, no Jesus – other than as a reference. Sorry.

    How do you feel about playing Tim Cratchitt as an adult? Do you have a solid G above middle C?

    • #24
    • October 22, 2015, at 9:22 AM PDT
    • Like
  25. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Concretevol:

    Garret Hobart: In the first run, this post had a lengthy section on how the Right — particularly the Southern Right — struggles to engage on race issues, occasionally for morally dubious reasons, but usually just to avoid being yelled at.

    There was some decent discussion around here during the whole “confederate flag” debate after the shooting in Charleston…..nationally, not so much. I think I would revise your statement somewhat because I don’t see it as a struggle for the “Southern Right” as much as just the “South”. The political Left however tends to get off the hook by dishonest pandering so I guess they have succeeded making it about the “Right”. Interesting bit of amnesia that the Dems completely controlled the South during segregation.

    You’re absolutely right. Race, as a political issue, has become nothing more than a tool used by the Left to end, not start, what would otherwise be substantive discussions about real issues. The way they manipulate what is an increasingly Northern, urban, and modern cultural fiasco into being about Southern attitudes a lifetime ago is as astonishing as it is dishonest. What I don’t understand is why we tolerate it.

    Get me started on this one and I’ll rail for hours, then have to spend the night drinking my way back to patriotism.

    • #25
    • October 22, 2015, at 9:57 AM PDT
    • Like
  26. Garret Hobart Inactive
    Garret Hobart

    Songwriter:

    Garret Hobart:

    Songwriter:Thanks for this post. I recently spent two years writing a commissioned faith-based musical that was (hopefully) entertaining without being preachy. I have “pie-in-the sky” hopes that the show might some day become a made-for-TV holiday movie. (Anybody from the Hallmark Channel reading this?) If that ever happens, I wonder if I would prefer the show to be skewered by critics or ignored altogether? Which is worse?

    A bespoke faith-based musical by one of the Ricochet faithful? This has to be the centerpiece of the next Meetup. I volunteer to play Jesus.

    Although I’ve written several with Jesus as a central character, this particular musical is based on Dickens characters – so, no Jesus – other than as a reference. Sorry.

    How do you feel about playing Tim Cratchitt as an adult? Do you have a solid G above middle C?

    I’m a natural baritone, but I can cover G4 for you if that’s what you need. You’ll start to lose me around C above.

    When I officially retired from the musical theater, I vowed never to return unless it was to play Tevye in an all Catholic production of Fiddler on the Roof. I think my fans would forgive me if I made an exception to play Jesus Christ, but Tiny Tim? They’d say I was just doing it for the money.

    Which, let’s be honest, I’m not above doing.

    • #26
    • October 22, 2015, at 10:13 AM PDT
    • Like
  27. Songwriter Member
    Songwriter Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Garret Hobart:

    Songwriter:

    Garret Hobart:

    A bespoke faith-based musical by one of the Ricochet faithful? This has to be the centerpiece of the next Meetup. I volunteer to play Jesus.

    Although I’ve written several with Jesus as a central character, this particular musical is based on Dickens characters – so, no Jesus – other than as a reference. Sorry.

    How do you feel about playing Tim Cratchitt as an adult? Do you have a solid G above middle C?

    I’m a natural baritone, but I can cover G4 for you if that’s what you need. You’ll start to lose me around C above.

    When I officially retired from the musical theater, I vowed never to return unless it was to play Tevye in an all Catholic production of Fiddler on the Roof. I think my fans would forgive me if I made an exception to play Jesus Christ, but Tiny Tim? They’d say I was just doing it for the money.

    Which, let’s be honest, I’m not above doing.

    No true musician is above doing it for the money.

    • #27
    • October 22, 2015, at 3:39 PM PDT
    • Like
  28. Concretevol Thatcher

    I smell a post in there Garret. You are more gooder with the words than me so you start and I will clutter up the place with comments.

    • #28
    • October 22, 2015, at 4:07 PM PDT
    • Like
  29. Trink Coolidge
    Trink Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Western Chauvinist:Where’s the danged “Like” this post button?!

    /she asks for the eleventy billionth time since December 2010.

    Dear Lord, man, if you’re not getting paid to write somewhere, it’s a sin. Another fabulous post.

    Sis, I honestly didn’t know you’d beat me over here and Wow! I was thinking exactly the same thing. The lead-in was eerily transporting . . . and I kept wondering – “Who is this guy?”

    OK. Who IS this guy? C’mon now. We want to get to know you. Pretty please.

    • #29
    • October 22, 2015, at 7:41 PM PDT
    • Like
  30. Trink Coolidge
    Trink Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Concretevol:I smell a post in there Garret.You are more gooder with the words than me so you start and I will clutter up the place with comments.

    You sir – are adorable. You made me chuckle. Thank you.

    • #30
    • October 22, 2015, at 7:44 PM PDT
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