You Are a Snob

 

snobNo one likes a snob. He lowers his salmon-colored Financial Times to register disgust with your every-colored USA Today. Picking up his detailed Maserati Quattroporte GTS (with sport package), he sighs as you bounce into the car wash with your 2008 Honda CR-V. He lives in a better neighborhood, his kids go to a better school, and his dog is a pure-bred shipped in from an artisanal kennel in Hungary.

Being called a snob is one of the worst insults you can offer to a class-denying American. That’s why CEOs brag to their employees about flying coach, celebs hang out with sick commoners at the local children’s hospital, and multimillionaire politicians suck down corn dogs like carny folk. (Note: None of these rules apply to The Donald, for he laughs at the iron laws of political physics.)

But the dirty little secret is that everyone is a snob. Hopefully not about many things, but always about something. Wherever you fall on the income scale, there is at least one area in which you will not skimp. The F-150 driver in rural Michigan who scoffs at the fools driving Chevy pickup trucks. A self-described redneck in Kentucky who only drinks Basil Hayden’s bourbon. The stoned surfer who wouldn’t be caught dead in a Quiksilver tee.

As for me, I’m a snob about a couple of things, but especially coffee. I might not live in a mansion or commute to Ricochet HQ on my Gulfstream, but I will delay paying my water bill in order to get beans shipped from Intelligentsia Coffee in Chicago. And I wouldn’t think twice.

A book titled Trading Up: Why Consumers Want New Luxury Goods — and How Companies Create Them discusses how the vast majority of Americans of all income levels will treat themselves to something special:

America’s middle-market consumers are trading up.

They are willing, even eager, to pay a premium price for remarkable kinds of goods that we call New Luxury — products and services that possess higher levels of quality, taste, and aspiration than other goods in the category but are not so expensive as to be out of reach.

Consider Jake, a 34-year-old construction worker earning about $50,000 a year, whose passion is golf. It took Jake a year to save enough money to buy a complete set of Callaway golf clubs — $3,000 worth of premium titanium-faced drivers, putters, and wedges — although he could have bought a decent set from a conventional producer for under $1,000.

As I said, my snobby vice is coffee. Even if I was living in a box under a freeway bridge, if a businessman walked by with a tankard full of 7-11 Hazelnut Blend, I would shake my head and think, “what a loser.”

How about you: what are the one or two areas in which you’re a complete snob?

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  1. Jimmy Carter Member
    Jimmy Carter
    @JimmyCarter

    Mike LaRoche:Country music, preferably from the late 1970s and early 1980s (the Urban Cowboy Era). Anything else is the screeching of strangling cats.

    Hay, LaRoche,

    We’re in Good Company:

    Merle Haggard had some harsh things to say about today’s country music.

    The artist told The Forum of Fargo-Moorehead that he doesn’t always understand it. “I don’t find no substance. I don’t find anything you can whistle, and nobody even attempts to write a melody. It’s more of that kids stuff. It’s hot right now, but I’ll tell you what — it’s cooling off.”

    However Haggard does support Sturgill Simpson, who opened for the country singer.

    “As far as I’m concerned, [Simpson]’s the only one out there. The rest of them sound like a bunch of sh** to me.”

    • #151
  2. Randy Webster Member
    Randy Webster
    @RandyWebster

    By the way, welcome, Jan.

    • #152
  3. Autistic License Inactive
    Autistic License
    @AutisticLicense

    The King Prawn
    Why hasn’t the word pretentiousness entered the discussion yet?

    Priustentious appletentiousness! (App-lee-ten-shus-ness)

    • #153
  4. St. Salieri Member
    St. Salieri
    @

    Misthiocracy:

    St. Salieri:And we haven’t made a real toys in this country since 1932…although the Germans make fine toys to – did…Lionel trains are for losers, give me Ives and now get off my lawn.

    Ives-Trains-Station_lg

    N-Scale or GTFO.

    N-Scale…N-scale!  If it won’t hurt my toddler by falling on him, doesn’t require an adult to wind it up, isn’t made out of cast iron, steel, and tin and likely to explode or electrocute you, and isn’t covered in nickle, brass, lithography, or lead paint; it isn’t a real toy.  It might be a model, but it isn’t a toy any self-respecting boy should play with, at least not for more than the 3 seconds before it breaks without also injuring the child!  Look after years of warming up to your Ricochet persona, you are now dead to me…dead….

    • #154
  5. SParker Member
    SParker
    @SParker

    Matt Balzer: Grolsch: Number one on the list of beer names that are as fun to say as they are to drink.

    Pilsner Urquell tops the list, my friend.  “Grolsch!” is an involuntary spasmodic esophageal response to a too-hasty imbibement of any beer or malt liquor (and sometimes Pepsi).  Fun to say, yes, but too easy.

    • #155
  6. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    Vicryl Contessa:

    Anna M.:Perfume, definitely. It amazes me that people will spend a fortune on their clothes and hair, then spray on some foghorn-loud synthetic garbage out of a bottle with a designer name on it. Niche and vintage all the way… your nose will thank you (so will the people around you).

    And yes, my perfume budget would frighten any financial advisor worth his salt into a fit of the vapors.

    What perfumiers do you like? I really like Creed and a couple from Bond no. 9. I also have a bottle of Guerlain Encens mythique d’orient that I would bathe in if I could. The next thing on my list to get is État Libre d’Orange’s Jasmin et Cigarette.

    Darnit VC, I saw you several times at the Nashville Meetup and never got close enough to smell you.  Now I’ll never know what I missed out on.  Hey Anna, do have any interest in going to a Ricochet Meetup in Chicago or Kansas City next year?

    • #156
  7. SParker Member
    SParker
    @SParker

    Randy Weivoda:Manual transmissions. When I see a fast, sporty car like a Corvette, 911, or Mustang GT with an automatic transmission, I sigh and feel sorry for the poor sap that drives it and doesn’t know what he’s missing.

    Like the enhanced joy of sitting in stop-and-go traffic for a couple of hours.

    • #157
  8. Basil Fawlty Member
    Basil Fawlty
    @BasilFawlty

    SParker:

    Randy Weivoda:Manual transmissions. When I see a fast, sporty car like a Corvette, 911, or Mustang GT with an automatic transmission, I sigh and feel sorry for the poor sap that drives it and doesn’t know what he’s missing.

    Like the enhanced joy of sitting in stop-and-go traffic for a couple of hours.

    CA v. MN.

    • #158
  9. Mike LaRoche Inactive
    Mike LaRoche
    @MikeLaRoche

    Jimmy Carter:

    Mike LaRoche:Country music, preferably from the late 1970s and early 1980s (the Urban Cowboy Era). Anything else is the screeching of strangling cats.

    Hay, LaRoche,

    We’re in Good Company:

    Merle Haggard had some harsh things to say about today’s country music.

    The artist told The Forum of Fargo-Moorehead that he doesn’t always understand it. “I don’t find no substance. I don’t find anything you can whistle, and nobody even attempts to write a melody. It’s more of that kids stuff. It’s hot right now, but I’ll tell you what — it’s cooling off.”

    However Haggard does support Sturgill Simpson, who opened for the country singer.

    “As far as I’m concerned, [Simpson]’s the only one out there. The rest of them sound like a bunch of sh** to me.”

    Heh.  Looks like the “Okie from Muskogee” still has some fire in his belly!

    • #159
  10. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    Mike LaRoche:

    Jimmy Carter:

    Hay, LaRoche,

    We’re in Good Company:

    Merle Haggard had some harsh things to say about today’s country music.

    The artist told The Forum of Fargo-Moorehead that he doesn’t always understand it. “I don’t find no substance. I don’t find anything you can whistle, and nobody even attempts to write a melody. It’s more of that kids stuff. It’s hot right now, but I’ll tell you what — it’s cooling off.”

    However Haggard does support Sturgill Simpson, who opened for the country singer.

    “As far as I’m concerned, [Simpson]’s the only one out there. The rest of them sound like a bunch of sh** to me.”

    Heh. Looks like the “Okie from Muskogee” still has some fire in his belly!

    No disrespect to Merle Haggard, because I’ve bought some of his albums and like a lot of his songs.  My wife read that article and told me about it.  It doesn’t matter what the profession is, old-timers and retirees usually think that young people are lousy it.  I’m sure the men 40 years older than Beethoven groused about those dang kids and their new-fangled symphonies.  And I suspect when Merle Haggard first started making a name for himself there were old men who complained then that country music isn’t what it used to be.

    • #160
  11. Owen Findy Member
    Owen Findy
    @OwenFindy

    Jimmy Carter:

    Owen Findy:Beer. I cannot wrap my head around anyone liking any of the old American brands of panther [CoC]: Pabst, Budweiser, Strohs (if it still exists), Black Label (if it still exists).

    Yuck.

    Oh. And I HATE it cold. I learned to drink beer in Austria. It was STRONG. It was rich in flavor, mellow (not overpowered with fizz), cool. COOL, not cold. It was the best.

    Commie.

    :D  Yes.  In this one, narrow sense am I a Europhile.  I guess.  But, still not a Pinko.

    • #161
  12. Owen Findy Member
    Owen Findy
    @OwenFindy

    Oh.  I just realized I’m also a wings snob.

    No.  Not the band.

    Skin, bone and rubbery-blubbery (H/T Shel Silverstein) connective tissue.  That’s it.

    What the heck is that about?

    I’ll tell you what it’s about.  It’s a medium for delivering the tasty sauce to your pie-hole.

    You could just as well paint your finger with it.

    I rest my case.

    • #162
  13. RightAngles Member
    RightAngles
    @RightAngles

    Randy Weivoda:… old-timers and retirees usually think that young people are lousy it. I’m sure the men 40 years older than Beethoven groused about those dang kids and their new-fangled symphonies. And I suspect when Merle Haggard first started making a name for himself there were old men who complained then that country music isn’t what it used to be.

    “The children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise.”

    – Socrates

    • #163
  14. Mountain Mike Inactive
    Mountain Mike
    @MichaelFarrow

    Eric Hines:The United States. Still a better country than any place else in the world.

    And wine. If the grapes weren’t grown in the Mosel or Tauber Valley, all that comes of them is rotted grape juice.

    Eric Hines

    How very sad.

    Only the finest wines (still or sparkling) from Amista Vineyards in Dry Creek Valley

    Home roasted Costa Rico coffee beans from Sweet Maria’s

    • #164
  15. Jimmy Carter Member
    Jimmy Carter
    @JimmyCarter

    Randy Weivoda: It doesn’t matter what the profession is, old-timers and retirees usually think that young people are lousy it. I’m sure the men 40 years older than Beethoven groused about those dang kids and their new-fangled symphonies. And I suspect when Merle Haggard first started making a name for himself there were old men who complained then that country music isn’t what it used to be.

    Damn kids and Their new fangled comments. No respect for Their elders. Comments ain’t nothing like They used to be in My time way back on Page 8.

    • #165
  16. Matt Balzer Member
    Matt Balzer
    @MattBalzer

    SParker:

    Matt Balzer: Grolsch: Number one on the list of beer names that are as fun to say as they are to drink.

    Pilsner Urquell tops the list, my friend. “Grolsch!” is an involuntary spasmodic esophageal response to a too-hasty imbibement of any beer or malt liquor (and sometimes Pepsi). Fun to say, yes, but too easy.

    If I’m not sure how to pronounce it (Urquell, not Pilsner) then it goes farther down on the list. Additionally, it has to be something I can continue to say the more of them I drink.

    • #166
  17. Owen Findy Member
    Owen Findy
    @OwenFindy

    Matt Balzer:

    SParker:

    Matt Balzer: Grolsch: Number one on the list of beer names that are as fun to say as they are to drink.

    Pilsner Urquell tops the list, my friend. “Grolsch!” is an involuntary spasmodic esophageal response to a too-hasty imbibement of any beer or malt liquor (and sometimes Pepsi). Fun to say, yes, but too easy.

    If I’m not sure how to pronounce it (Urquell, not Pilsner) then it goes farther down on the list. Additionally, it has to be something I can continue to say the more of them I drink.

    For some reason, my fave brew is the Austrian Gösser….

    • #167
  18. Matt Balzer Member
    Matt Balzer
    @MattBalzer

    Owen Findy:

    Matt Balzer:

    SParker:

    Matt Balzer: Grolsch: Number one on the list of beer names that are as fun to say as they are to drink.

    Pilsner Urquell tops the list, my friend. “Grolsch!” is an involuntary spasmodic esophageal response to a too-hasty imbibement of any beer or malt liquor (and sometimes Pepsi). Fun to say, yes, but too easy.

    If I’m not sure how to pronounce it (Urquell, not Pilsner) then it goes farther down on the list. Additionally, it has to be something I can continue to say the more of them I drink.

    For some reason, my fave brew is the Austrian Gösser….

    Just bought some Spaten Oktoberfest. Still great despite drinking after going to the Chinese buffet. I had some on tap once, probably the best beer I’ve ever had.

    • #168
  19. J.C. Bachman Inactive
    J.C. Bachman
    @JCB

    Whiskey Sam:New model Jeeps. I refuse to wave at those people in Fiatmobiles and 4-door Hummer wannabes posing as Jeeps.

    No doubt. The new Jeep designs must be the worst interpretation of a classic design in the history of mass production. Those grills look like nothing Jeep ever has been or should be. But how about Kia and Hyundai? There current  styling is impressive – fully expect to see a luxury hood ornament on those cars.

    • #169
  20. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    Merle Haggard had some harsh things to say about today’s country music.

    The artist told The Forum of Fargo-Moorehead that he doesn’t always understand it. “I don’t find no substance. I don’t find anything you can whistle, and nobody even attempts to write a melody. It’s more of that kids stuff. It’s hot right now, but I’ll tell you what — it’s cooling off.”

    However Haggard does support Sturgill Simpson, who opened for the country singer.

    “As far as I’m concerned, [Simpson]’s the only one out there. The rest of them sound like a bunch of sh** to me.”

    Heh. Looks like the “Okie from Muskogee” still has some fire in his belly!

    No disrespect to Merle Haggard, because I’ve bought some of his albums and like a lot of his songs. My wife read that article and told me about it. It doesn’t matter what the profession is, old-timers and retirees usually think that young people are lousy it. I’m sure the men 40 years older than Beethoven groused about those dang kids and their new-fangled symphonies. And I suspect when Merle Haggard first started making a name for himself there were old men who complained then that country music isn’t what it used to be.

    I like Junior Brown:

    More here: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Junior+Brown

    • #170
  21. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    J.C.B.:

    Whiskey Sam:New model Jeeps. I refuse to wave at those people in Fiatmobiles and 4-door Hummer wannabes posing as Jeeps.

    No doubt. The new Jeep designs must be the worst interpretation of a classic design in the history of mass production. Those grills look like nothing Jeep ever has been or should be. But how about Kia and Hyundai? There current styling is impressive – fully expect to see a luxury hood ornament on those cars.

    If you want a real Jeep you can try importing one from India:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahindra_Thar

    • #171
  22. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    Owen Findy:Beer. I cannot wrap my head around anyone liking any of the old American brands of panther [CoC]: Pabst, Budweiser, Strohs (if it still exists), Black Label (if it still exists).

    Yuck.

    Oh. And I HATE it cold. I learned to drink beer in Austria. It was STRONG. It was rich in flavor, mellow (not overpowered with fizz), cool. COOL, not cold. It was the best.

    Isn’t Black Label a Canuckistani brand? Carling’s a Montreal brewery (or was), no?

    • #172
  23. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    Ball Diamond Ball:

    BastiatJunior:

    Misthiocracy:I’m surprised we haven’t seen any comments from any KDE snobs.

    They tend to be really militant.

    This question ought to set them off. What’s KDE?

    Oh, it’s a fork of gnome that nobody uses anymore.

    I thought the whole point of KDE was that it doesn’t use GTK, like Gnome does, and that it’s not terribly popular because nearly everything ends up using GTK eventually.

    Am I really that out of touch? No. It’s the children who are wrong.

    • #173
  24. jetstream Inactive
    jetstream
    @jetstream

    No, can’t agree, Gnome is the greasy kid stuff.

    • #174
  25. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    jetstream:No, can’t agree, Gnome is the greasy kid stuff.

    I agree with that. I use only LXDE as my desktop environment (or FLWM if I’m using a really low-powered computer).

    • #175
  26. jetstream Inactive
    jetstream
    @jetstream

    Misthiocracy:

    jetstream:No, can’t agree, Gnome is the greasy kid stuff.

    I agree with that. I use only LXDE as my desktop environment (or FLWM if I’m using a really low-powered computer).

    Yeah, one of Stevey’s drunken rants’ relayed a discussion he had with a perl programmer while he was still at Amazon .. “dude, not everything is an object” .. with the exception of a gui interface where just about everything is an object and C++ is and should be the first choice :-)

    • #176
  27. Ball Diamond Ball Inactive
    Ball Diamond Ball
    @BallDiamondBall

    Just doing my part to raise awareness.

    • #177
  28. Tenacious D Inactive
    Tenacious D
    @TenaciousD

    Materials.
    Household furniture should be solid wood, not veneer on fibreboard. For smaller objects, stone, glass, wood, ceramic, and a variety of metals can be acceptable depending on the application. Since getting into 3D printing I’m also warming up to thermoplastics. And sometimes it’s three-one-six stainless or nothing. The key is really that some thought (besides cheapness) should go into the choice of material.

    • #178
  29. TheRoyalFamily Member
    TheRoyalFamily
    @TheRoyalFamily

    Ketchup: Heinz or nothing. I’m sure there are some gourmet ketchups out there, but I haven’t seen them. It’s no wonder I grew up hating most things at home that used ketchup: Mom usually bought Hunt’s, because it’s cheaper.

    • #179
  30. Randy Webster Member
    Randy Webster
    @RandyWebster

    Heinz is out because of John Kerry.  Buy it if you must, commie traitor.

    • #180
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