Trump v Univision

 

It’s  3:00 a.m in Paris, and I’m awake owing to a cat-related incident. After realizing that no, I wasn’t going to be able to fall asleep, I checked the news. As one does. Headlining: Donald Trump kicked TV’s most influential Latino newsman out of a press conference. Oh, I thought. Is this really the most important thing happening in the world right now? To judge from the headlines, you’d think so. Here’s the first part of the exchange:

And here’s the second:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7_HaEOIJhM

Two quick observations:

1) The Washington Post says, “The lasting image will be that of Ramos — who serves as Univision’s lead anchor and is effectively one of the (if not the) most powerful newsmen on Spanish-language TV — being hustled out of the room after trying to ask Trump a question.”

Perhaps. But that may be because that’s the easiest image to find. You have to work a bit harder to find the images of Ramos coming back and asking his questions. It’s not impossible. We looked for it backstage and it took us about five minutes. But clearly the Post and many other news agencies quickly decided what the “lasting image” would be and furnished it: In most of the videos in the headline news, the clip ends with Ramos being hustled off.

As you can see from the second clip, however, that’s not where the story necessarily ends. So I’m not sure the Post is correct about what the “lasting image” will be.

2) As we were looking for the full clip — not the “lasting image” clip — I said, “From abroad, it feels as if Trump is already the president.” It wasn’t a deep thought: It was just something that occurred to me. Nachtgedanken, so to speak. The Yeti said, “You should post that.” To which I responded that I wasn’t sure what I meant by it:

Claire: He gets more news coverage; he seems larger-than-life.

Yeti: I assume it means that Trump is suffocating every other candidate’s media oxygen.

Claire: Not only every other candidate — but the seated president.

I don’t know if that observation is meaningful. All I can say is that those words occurred to me while reading the news at 3:00 am in Paris.

And now I can’t sleep.

 

Published in Elections, General, Politics
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  1. Luke Thatcher
    Luke
    @Luke

    Claire Berlinski, Ed.:

    Joseph Eagar: What you might call New England whites (Germanic/Scandinavian) seem to have reached some sort of tipping point in their dislike of those of us of Irish or Southern/Central European descent.

    This really doesn’t sound like the America I grew up in. Prejudice against those of Irish descent? That was true of the New York my parents grew up in, but now?

    That reminds me of a story I’ve been meaning to share … 

    So, to tie this together, some of us are rooting for Trump, because he’s a fighter. The Turks feel for this guy because he’s a fighter.

    If they weren’t so successful in the scrap, either story would just be a footnote.

    • #120
  2. Mike LaRoche Inactive
    Mike LaRoche
    @MikeLaRoche

    kylez:

    Mike LaRoche:

    Great Ghost of Gödel:

    Claire Berlinski, Ed.:

    Mike LaRoche: True, but perception is reality. Optics.

    “… LaRoche entered his surprising postmodern phase in the summer of 2016.”

    I thought it was in the 1960s.

    Oh, wait. That was LaRouche. Carry on.

    Crazy old Uncle Lyndon. The family will never live that down.

    I almost asked you on that other thread if you are related to him. So you are?

    Possibly.  After all, he shares the same surname as my cousin Annie the Cheerleader and LaRouche/LaRoche/LaRush are all variations on the same name.  Moreover, the family was among “Les Habitants” – the original settlers of what is now Québec who arrived in the 1600s.

    • #121
  3. Roberto Member
    Roberto
    @Roberto

    A bit of background makes it very clear that Ramos was at that conference spoiling for a fight and explicitly doing so in the role of an activist. It appears he has been wishing to take a few shots at Trump for awhile now but has been unable to secure an interview.

    But he would also say that, with the nation’s Latino population growing rapidly, the number of Latino elected officials nowhere near keeping pace and the fate of some 11.3 million undocumented immigrants — many of whom are Latino — now the primary issue in the 2016 election, he and the rest of the news staff at Univision must also play another role: They must embrace the work of social justice. They must report accurately and fairly but never pretend that all information or points of view are equally valid.

    The work of Ramos and Univision, as he has told it, is to provide Latinos with the information they need to attend to their political and social interests. Ramos is a crusading journalist, and he does not deny it…In contrast to Romney and Obama, Trump has refused multiple interview requests from Ramos, including one extended by Univision on Tuesday night.

    • #122
  4. Mike LaRoche Inactive
    Mike LaRoche
    @MikeLaRoche

    Marion Evans:

    Mike LaRoche:What I see is a pushy foreign national trying to conduct his own personal filibuster during Donald Trump’s press conference. From the clip above, Trump appeared quite gracious and willing to honestly answer the questions asked of him.

    You need to readjust those sun shades. A) Ramos is a naturalized American citizen. B) You think that throwing an accomplished journalist out of the room is a ‘gracious’ thing to do?

    Nothing wrong with my shades.  As pointed out upthread, Ramos is an activist and an ethnic chauvinist who got exactly what he deserved.  In the immortal words of Kwai Chang Caine, “Men do not beat drums before they hunt for tigers.”

    • #123
  5. Mike LaRoche Inactive
    Mike LaRoche
    @MikeLaRoche

    Claire Berlinski, Ed.:

    Joseph Eagar: Hispanics are only pawns in the Great White Class/Ethnic Conflict We Must All Pretend Isn’t Happening. But I digress)

    That doesn’t seem a digression, it seems an important argument. But I’m not sure what you mean by it, even after reading what you wrote carefully (I think). Can you explain?

    I do think you’re right to sense “class conflict.” But in what sense do you mean that Hispanics are pawns of this?

    It’s entirely possible that I’m not fully in touch with what’s happening in the US right now. When I was last in the US, though, I certainly didn’t sense this level of animosity. That you’re reporting this is very frightening.

    John Derbyshire explains what he calls the Goodwhite-Badwhite Civil War in his latest podcast.

    • #124
  6. Mike LaRoche Inactive
    Mike LaRoche
    @MikeLaRoche

    Claire Berlinski, Ed.:

    Tuck: That’s one of those statements that needs to be re-written. There are plenty of Latinos who are good faith participants in American democracy. My wife is one of them.

    I suspect it’s at root tautologous, too: I have a feeling that any American of Spanish origin who agrees with us politically would end up being defined as “not really Latino.” As Mike LaRoche often reminds us, he’s got lots of Latin-origin blood. He’d be defined as “Latino,” if we that’s how we measure it. Is he an American of good faith? I reckon so.

    Indeed, the vast majority are.  But racist/irredentist groups like La Raza are not. Funny thing is, growing up in an ethnically homogeneous bordertown like Laredo (95% Hispanic) I hardly ever heard such grievance mongering and ethnic separatism; didn’t encounter it in any significant form until I pursued my undergraduate studies in San Antonio.  My maternal ancestors have fought on the Texan/American side of every war since the 1830s.  My great-great-great grandfather was formally administered his oath of American citizenship in 1847 by none other than Mirabeau B. Lamar, the former President of the Republic of Texas.  The blatherings of fools like Ramos are utterly foreign to me.

    • #125
  7. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Great Ghost of Gödel:

    …..

    I’ll add here that everything I’ve heard about/from Ms. Kelly has been perfectly reasonable and professional. I remain not-a-fan, but not because of what I would call character flaws.

    Trump, on the other hand, destroys whatever admiration I might be tempted to feel by giving every indication that he can’t handle an attractive woman deigning to disagree with him, even a little. All he’d have to do would be laugh, say “You know, I didn’t go in expecting Fox to act like a CNN proxy. It was clever, and they got me. Next time it’ll be on them.” But I think his critics’ point is that his ego won’t let him do that, and I’m afraid that’s probably right. And I don’t want another egomaniac in the White House.

    I still don’t see how Trump failed to “handle” – ahem – Kelly. He seems to have won the moment, and people keep asking him about it so he responds now. My suspicion is that people can’t get over the thought that this episode was supposed to have damaged Trump – but I don’t see the damage. It didn’t mean much at the time and it still doesn’t mean much.

    • #126
  8. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Leigh:

    Ansonia:Re: 29

    This particular incident is what they mean by “He fights”. But we somehow miss that other candidates, who don’t have a problem speaking appropriately to and about women, and who respect property rights, are proven fighters. I’m thinking of Scott Walker, Bobby Jindal, Rick Perry.

    I think that’s because it’s easy to misunderstand what political “fighting” actually is. There’s a place for political theater. Sometimes it’s even important. But that’s not what actually gets things done, and neither is just “spine.” “Fight” can be patient explanation and negotiation and thoughtful planning of policy. It can be knowing when to put your foot in the door and when to try to slam the door open. It’s the long, hard slog, not just the flashy moments.

    I have no doubt that Trump has excellent skills in this area too, aside from the political theater. Perhaps even better than many of the seasoned candidates he’s up against. The doubt comes from what exactly it is that he wants to get done.

    • #127
  9. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Claire Berlinski, Ed.:

    Mendel: To add to Leigh’s comment above, bear in mind the kabuki is strong in this incident.

    It is, and I feel that I’m somehow participating in a sick death dance. I wake up and it’s the top of the headlines, even though it’s not, inherently, a particularly newsworthy incident. I get drawn into the story; I post something about my reaction about it, and somehow we’ve all spent hours thinking about it.

    They both wanted media attention and they both got it. I did my small part to give it to them. The world isn’t a better place for it.

    Except that we’ve been complaining for how many decades that it’s all kabuki anyway. Only it’s been bland, meaningless, and apparently ineffectual (for us) kabuki. It’s yet to be seen whether Trump’s version will be an innovation or an utter error.

    • #128
  10. carcat74 Member
    carcat74
    @carcat74

    Just watched both videos.  Ramos was a disrupting force, and Trump was the oil on the water.  I haven’t expressed support for him before, but I did think Trump’s response was calm, measured, and direct.  He spent considerable time on Ramos, who didn’t deserve it, and didn’t really show anger, belligerence, or bombast.  He gave some specific answers (get rid of the gangs), and it amazed me how long it took for Ramos to agree the gangs need to go.  Trump said the good people are welcome to return and become citizens—legally.

    Someone posted on another thread asking why is it so difficult, expensive, and time-consuming to become a citizen.  Ten to fifteen years aren’t uncommon—how long does it take to check out someone?  We spend more effort vetting people  wanting to be citizens than we did on a certain President!

    Speaking of b.o., how do you think HE would have handled a difficult reporter acting like Ramos?

    • #129
  11. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Umbra Fractus:

    inmateprof:You are correct. It amazes me how people don’t get it. We are tired of getting bullied by the left (media, education, and culture), and Trump comes along and fights. Peter on every podcast talks about wanting candidates to fight, and we have one. Is he perfect? No, but neither was Romney, McCain, Bush, Dole, and even Reagan. Full disclosure, I’m a Carly supporter, but I get Trump, and I know he’s not going away, and I appreciate his efforts.

    So the gist is that you want someone who “fights,” and whether or not he’s actually a conservative apparently doesn’t matter.

    That’s what people like me don’t get. He is, by any objective measure, to the left of everybody in the field except maybe Kasich, and yet somehow supporting him has become the litmus test for being a true conservative?

    Agreed. However, the “the base” has been getting slammed (unfairly, IMO) for demanding purity. Now there’s fervor for a guy who might be with us 50% of the time and the base is being excoriated for not being pure enough.

    Much of this comes down to differences over what “electable” means or over what “acceptable compromise” means. Then there’s also the criticism that he’s unserious: I suspect that may be somewhat true, but this series of clips isn’t evidence of that.

    • #130
  12. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    MarciN:Not that it matters very much, but Trump was wrong when he said that GW was a poor manager. GW was an excellent manager.

    Unless he was talking about Jeb, in which case I just don’t know if the claim is true or not.

    • #131
  13. Nick Stuart Inactive
    Nick Stuart
    @NickStuart

    130+ Replies and counting, and we’re still on the topic of the OP.

    It takes Trump to trump the Topic That Shall Not Be Named.

    • #132
  14. Umbra Fractus Inactive
    Umbra Fractus
    @UmbraFractus

    Ed G.: Agreed. However, the “the base” has been getting slammed (unfairly, IMO) for demanding purity. Now there’s fervor for a guy who might be with us 50% of the time and the base is being excoriated for not being pure enough.

    What I’m seeing, though, is a bunch of people who frequently declare that 80% is not enough lining up to support said 50%-er (I think you’re being generous) while still insisting that the 80%-ers are unacceptable.

    Support for Trump has no rational basis and seems to be based entirely on “the feels” (as the kids say.) That never ends well.

    • #133
  15. Mark Thatcher
    Mark
    @GumbyMark

    carcat74:

    Just watched both videos. Ramos was a disrupting force, and Trump was the oil on the water. I haven’t expressed support for him before, but I did think Trump’s response was calm, measured, and direct. He spent considerable time on Ramos, who didn’t deserve it, and didn’t really show anger, belligerence, or bombast. He gave some specific answers (get rid of the gangs), and it amazed me how long it took for Ramos to agree the gangs need to go. Trump said the good people are welcome to return and become citizens—legally.

    Amen.  I happened to watch much of it live.  I can’t stand Trump and think he’d be a lousy President but he did a great job handling Ramos.  What could be more emblemmatic than a spokesperson for illegal immigrants demanding he be given priority over the other reporters in asking questions?  I applaud Trump for how he did it and wish others would stand up as forcefully.  And if it came down to choosing between Trump and Bush I’d pick Trump.

    • #134
  16. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Douglas:

    Marion Evans:The only thing missing from that visual with Trump’s goon moving Jorge Ramos out of the room was a nicely pressed brown shirt with a red arm band emblazoned with a big T on it.

    R….

    That’s ludicrous. I don’t give a damn if he’s a “leading figure”. He was acting like a snotty troll. Trump slapped him down and he deserved every bit of it. He’s snide and dishonest, an activist in disguise as a journalist. He had no right to hijack the press conference, completely walking all over the other reporters to be the center of attention. The right way to handle it was exactly what Trump did: send the petulant child out of the room until it was his turn.

    It’s all a metaphor for the immigration issue anyway. Someone goes out of turn and contrary to the rules, is given a chance to correct himself and join the team, is asked to leave when he refuses to correct himself, and then is still given a chance to return later. That dance is apparently now hateful and unfair to the guy jumping in out of turn, even to the point of putting Ramos in the place of a victim of a pogrom.

    EDIT: Mark beat me to pointing out that this episode was a symbolic of the whole immigration issue.

    • #135
  17. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Umbra Fractus:

    Ed G.: Agreed. However, the “the base” has been getting slammed (unfairly, IMO) for demanding purity. Now there’s fervor for a guy who might be with us 50% of the time and the base is being excoriated for not being pure enough.

    What I’m seeing, though, is a bunch of people who frequently declare that 80% is not enough lining up to support said 50%-er (I think you’re being generous) while still insisting that the 80%-ers are unacceptable.

    Support for Trump has no rational basis and seems to be based entirely on “the feels” (as the kids say.) That never ends well.

    Ok, maybe they’re hypocrites. Or maybe they have other reasoning. The basic point still stands, though: if they were wrong to not support an 80% candidate then is it more important for them to be consistent or for them to embrace the logic of 50% is better than 0%?

    As I also said earlier, though, I think there is a fundamental disagreement at play over what “electability” means in general and as applied to particular candidates.

    • #136
  18. Xennady Member
    Xennady
    @

    Claire Berlinski, Ed.:Perhaps, but surely that’s not a vision of American greatness. The United States created the modern world. It’s functioned since the Second World War as a guarantor of the postwar order. If the secret to his appeal is the promise of a smaller America, why not stick with Obama?

    I take your point, but this isn’t 1950. The United States doesn’t have the relative power it once did, and it’s futile to pretend otherwise.

    To pick one example, in 1950 Detroit was home to some of the world’s most advanced manufacturing capability along with two million people, and Singapore was a third-world irrelevance. Today, Detroit attracts tourists to look at the ruins, and Singapore has its own air force and navy.

    Yet the United States is still promising to defend Singapore, recently stationing one of our increasingly scarce navy ships there. Meanwhile, back in Detroit, much of the city is abandoned to lawlessness.

    It seems to me that this situation displays misplaced priorities for the United States government.

    This has and will have many consequences, one of which is the surprising success (so far) of Donald Trump and his message.

    • #137
  19. Xennady Member
    Xennady
    @

    SoDakBoy:

    Have you seen the Ellen Page surprise attack interview with Ted Cruz. Effective. Demolished her arguments so that she had no response other than to sulk away. Yet, he was respectful and acted like an adult.

    Unfortunately, people who act like adults don’t get noticed in the summer before an election year. Too bad, that event (or Carly’s demolitions of various media surprise attacks) doesn’t get noticed amidst the fog of Trump.

    I’ve seen of it, although like most people I’d never heard of this Ellen Page person.

    Thing is, though, people like her have gotten away with so much for so long that they literally do not understand that they need to have their own arguments and logic- and when they lose they’re too oblivious to even notice.

    Sad, in a way.

    • #138
  20. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    Re : 124
    I feel really guilty about having mostly enjoyed that radio program at the link you provided.

    • #139
  21. Joseph Eagar Member
    Joseph Eagar
    @JosephEagar

    Claire Berlinski, Ed.:

    Joseph Eagar: up in. Prejudice against those of Irish descent? That was true of the New York my parents grew up in, but now?

    That reminds me of a story I’ve been meaning to share … 

    Awesome video.  I’ve got to admit, I have wondered whether the prejudice against Irish people is new to my generation.  My parents say they never experienced the sorts of things I and a few of my friends have (especially the employment discrimination; apparently that is new).

    Look, Irish people tend not to have social skills as good as other white ethnic groups (people like Joe Biden are not exactly uncommon).  It’s very easy for us to accidentally annoy people, especially us males.  And people do not understand just how underprivileged Irish men of my generation are.  I attended a university in northern Arizona for three years, where I witnessed people much less qualified than me get comfy students jobs seemingly at the drop of a hat, while the only work available to us Irish kids was fast food (which I was physically incapable of doing).

    And that’s only the beginning.  When I finally did get a job, I discovered I had taught myself software engineering to a graduate level (I do research in computer graphics as part of my job now).  Most people do not have to self-educate themselves to that degree just to get an entry-level engineering job.

    • #140
  22. Mike LaRoche Inactive
    Mike LaRoche
    @MikeLaRoche

    Ansonia:Re : 124 I feel really guilty about having mostly enjoyed that radio program at the link you provided.

    Yep, listening to a Derb podcast is like enjoying an extra shot of fine bourbon whiskey.

    • #141
  23. Leigh Inactive
    Leigh
    @Leigh

    Ed G.: I have no doubt that Trump has excellent skills in this area too, aside from the political theater. Perhaps even better than many of the seasoned candidates he’s up against. The doubt comes from what exactly it is that he wants to get done.

    Nothing in Trump’s policy proposals or rhetoric indicates to me that he’s grappled with the reality of needing to actually get things through Congress.  They’re not going to vote for “making Mexico pay for the wall.”  Or for taxing businesses who manufacture in Mexico at 35% (or whatever it was).  And so on.

    • #142
  24. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Leigh:

    Ed G.: I have no doubt that Trump has excellent skills in this area too, aside from the political theater. Perhaps even better than many of the seasoned candidates he’s up against. The doubt comes from what exactly it is that he wants to get done.

    Nothing in Trump’s policy proposals or rhetoric indicates to me that he’s grappled with the reality of needing to actually get things through Congress. They’re not going to vote for “making Mexico pay for the wall.” Or for taxing businesses who manufacture in Mexico at 35% (or whatever it was). And so on.

    But leading with what you think you can get through congress is not the way to either campaign or negotiate. That’s been a big problem with our side for a long time. Now is not the time for grappling, now is the time for sharing a vision and a direction. When the time comes to grapple, we still shouldn’t give ground unless the other side first forces it.

    • #143
  25. Marion Evans Inactive
    Marion Evans
    @MarionEvans

    Mike LaRoche:

    Marion Evans:

    Mike LaRoche:What I see is a pushy foreign national trying to conduct his own personal filibuster during Donald Trump’s press conference. From the clip above, Trump appeared quite gracious and willing to honestly answer the questions asked of him.

    You need to readjust those sun shades. A) Ramos is a naturalized American citizen. B) You think that throwing an accomplished journalist out of the room is a ‘gracious’ thing to do?

    Nothing wrong with my shades. As pointed out upthread, Ramos is an activist and an ethnic chauvinist who got exactly what he deserved. In the immortal words of Kwai Chang Caine, “Men do not beat drums before they hunt for tigers.”

    What? What is this, a Clint Eastwood movie?

    • #144
  26. Marion Evans Inactive
    Marion Evans
    @MarionEvans

    Ed G.:

    Douglas:

    Marion Evans:The only thing missing from that visual with Trump’s goon moving Jorge Ramos out of the room was a nicely pressed brown shirt with a red arm band emblazoned with a big T on it.

    R….

    That’s ludicrous. I don’t give a damn if he’s a “leading figure”. He was acting like a snotty troll. Trump slapped him down and he deserved every bit of it. He’s snide and dishonest, an activist in disguise as a journalist. He had no right to hijack the press conference, completely walking all over the other reporters to be the center of attention. The right way to handle it was exactly what Trump did: send the petulant child out of the room until it was his turn.

    It’s all a metaphor for the immigration issue anyway. Someone goes out of turn and contrary to the rules, is given a chance to correct himself and join the team, is asked to leave when he refuses to correct himself, and then is still given a chance to return later. That dance is apparently now hateful and unfair to the guy jumping in out of turn, even to the point of putting Ramos in the place of a victim of a pogrom.

    You are a disaster at metaphors, the absolute worst. Sorry for the blunt talk but I was using a Donald Trump form of speaking.

    • #145
  27. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Marion Evans:

    Ed G.:

    …..

    It’s all a metaphor for the immigration issue anyway. Someone goes out of turn and contrary to the rules, is given a chance to correct himself and join the team, is asked to leave when he refuses to correct himself, and then is still given a chance to return later. That dance is apparently now hateful and unfair to the guy jumping in out of turn, even to the point of putting Ramos in the place of a victim of a pogrom.

    You are a disaster at metaphors, the absolute worst. Sorry for the blunt talk but I was using a Donald Trump form of speaking.

    I generally avoid metaphors and analogies, but the parallels to this episode are rather obvious. Which part of the chain I described do you disagree with?

    • #146
  28. Leigh Inactive
    Leigh
    @Leigh

    Ed G.: But leading with what you think you can get through congress is not the way to either campaign or negotiate. That’s been a big problem with our side for a long time. Now is not the time for grappling, now is the time for sharing a vision and a direction. When the time comes to grapple, we still shouldn’t give ground unless the other side first forces it.

    I don’t think you quite took my point — that’s not what I’m trying to get at.  The question was why the people who had actually fought for conservative principles and won battles — Walker, Jindal, Perry — aren’t gaining more traction.  I think that at least in part, it’s because what they actually did to win those battles is really rather boring.  That the hard work of actual governance is usually boring.  That the difference between a good policy and a bad one can be a few really boring details.

    And that we don’t like to pay attention to “boring” when choosing candidates.

    • #147
  29. Ed G. Inactive
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Leigh:

    Ed G.: …..

    I don’t think you quite took my point — that’s not what I’m trying to get at. The question was why the people who had actually fought for conservative principles and won battles — Walker, Jindal, Perry — aren’t gaining more traction. I think that at least in part, it’s because what they actually did to win those battles is really rather boring. That the hard work of actual governance is usually boring. That the difference between a good policy and a bad one can be a few really boring details.

    And that we don’t like to pay attention to “boring” when choosing candidates.

    I took your point, and my suspicion is that Trump has those “boring” skills too. You’re taking his display of media skills now as evidence that he lacks the blocking and tackling skills. I don’t think it follows. Howver I do share your misgivings about what Trump’s policy positions really are.

    As to why Walker et al (I’ll stop at Walker since he’s my preference) can’t get traction, I can’t explain. Except that Walker didn’t exactly go stealth mode and boring in his Wisconsin battles: they were out in the open and straightforward and unapologetic. He doesn’t have that same immediate conflict to play off of in the presidential campaign like he did in his Wisconsin exploits. Trump is being given all kinds of conflict to play off of.

    • #148
  30. James Gawron Inactive
    James Gawron
    @JamesGawron

    Mike LaRoche:

    Ansonia:Re : 124 I feel really guilty about having mostly enjoyed that radio program at the link you provided.

    Yep, listening to a Derb podcast is like enjoying an extra shot of fine bourbon whiskey.

    Mike,

    Derb..Derb..Derb!!!

    Why don’t we have a weekly member feed sponsored Derb pod cast. Well at least we can post the link where people will see it. Yep, back by popular demand or at least popular URL.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #149
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