Brawndo-world

 

Brawndo-worldTwenty years ago, Hollywood feared a world with too much water. Dennis Hopper’s jet skis chased Kevin Costner’s trimaran across the endless seas of Waterworld as they searched for dry land and their lost careers.

The filmmakers got the prediction wrong as California is nothing but dry land and it’s hard to find water for crops, lawns, and golf courses. Before long, the state might take inspiration from another movie, irrigating their plants with Brawndo (it’s got electrolytes). Until then, Sacramento is looking for a more manageable solution.

The formerly golden state could ameliorate the drought by updating environmental policies that choose bait fish over humans. Or, instead of building a luxe, high-speed rail line from Madera to Bakersfield, they could try desalination plants on a certain large body of water located immediately to their west.

But California being California, the state government instead created a Byzantine set of regulations to restrict their citizens’ behavior. The government will tell you how much water you are allowed to use, and if you oppose them may Gaia have mercy on your soul.

Caught in the bureaucratic crossfire is Mountain House, a little town east of the Bay Area. On Friday, state officials decided to shut down the community’s primary water source leaving the area with just half the water it needs.

The only way the city can adjust to this new reality is banning all outdoor irrigation. “That would basically mean that Mountain House would lose potentially hundreds of thousands, if not millions of dollars in landscaping that has already been put in place,” according to the town’s general manager, Ed Pattison.

“My arguments to others outside of Mountain House regarding this economic plight fall on somewhat deaf ears,” he added, “because the agricultural sector, as well as other communities, are losing tens of millions of dollars.” The community is attempting to purchase water from another source, though it’s hard to find parched communities willing to share with their neighbors.

Every month another story emerges from California that makes out-of-staters think, “Now will those Democrat voters get it?” Then the state sends another batch of leftists to Sacramento to pass more job-killing, life-denying restrictions on their everyday activities. But the current crisis isn’t merely bad economic theory or social justice activism; a state filled with rivers, lakes and bordering an ocean is running out of water.

I ask again: Now will they get it?

Published in Domestic Policy, Entertainment, Science & Technology
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  1. user_138106 Member
    user_138106
    @LidensCheng

    And Jerry Brown goes around telling people he doesn’t take showers. This is a state governor of a first world country.

    • #1
  2. MikeHs Inactive
    MikeHs
    @MikeHs

    We’re doomed.

    • #2
  3. Valiuth Member
    Valiuth
    @Valiuth

    Lidens Cheng:And Jerry Brown goes around telling people he doesn’t take showers. This is a state governor of a first world county.

    I guess their policies aren’t the only things that stink.

    • #3
  4. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: The government will tell you how much water you are allowed to use, and if you oppose them may Gaia have mercy on your soul.

    Ya know, in Greek mythology Gaia was never really a wrathful goddess.

    I’m just sayin’…

    • #4
  5. user_1065645 Member
    user_1065645
    @DaveSussman

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: Every month another story emerges from California that makes out-of-staters think, “Now will those Democrat voters get it?” Then the state sends more leftists to Sacramento to pass more job-killing, life-denying restrictions on their everyday activities. But the current crisis isn’t merely bad economic theories or social justice activism; a state filled with rivers, lakes and bordering an ocean is running out of water. I ask again: Now will they get it?

    If it isn’t the drought, its’ exodus of business. If not business leaving, then it’s the ascending tax rates. If not taxes, its education… I can keep going.

    To answer your question, No.

    LA County and the greater Bay Area are filled with brain mush who get their news from TMZ while wealthy Silicon Valley and Hollywood leftist overlords parcel up the state through voter propositions. Props are sold as well-intentioned progressive enlightenment while saddling the state with more restrictions and debt.

    Remember, during the last election 400,000 CA voters pulled the lever for indicted gun runner Leland Yee. These voters only needed to know 2 things: He was a (D) and a minority.

    • #5
  6. danys Thatcher
    danys
    @danys

    The Democrats won’t learn. They just post signs like this in their drought tolerant yards.

    Screen Shot 2015-06-16 at 5.22.18 PM

    source: joinh2no.com

    Note: I have some drought tolerant plants in my yard. The signs make me want to gag.

    • #6
  7. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    Hy

    danys:The Democrats won’t learn. They just post signs like this in their drought tolerant yards.

    Screen Shot 2015-06-16 at 5.22.18 PM

    First they’re against water, and now they’re against Dihydrogenated Nitrogen Monoxide?

    • #7
  8. billy Inactive
    billy
    @billy

    Misthiocracy:

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: The government will tell you how much water you are allowed to use, and if you oppose them may Gaia have mercy on your soul.

    Ya know, in Greek mythology Gaia was never really a wrathful goddess.

    I’m just sayin’…

    Oh, but in Leftist mythology she has got plenty of wrath.

    • #8
  9. Larry3435 Inactive
    Larry3435
    @Larry3435

    Lidens Cheng:And Jerry Brown goes around telling people he doesn’t take showers. This is a state governor of a first world country.

    First world country?  I’m sorry, but you’re mistaken.  Jerry Brown is the governor of California.

    • #9
  10. danys Thatcher
    danys
    @danys

    Misthiocracy:Hy

    danys:The Democrats won’t learn. They just post signs like this in their drought tolerant yards.

    Screen Shot 2015-06-16 at 5.22.18 PM

    First they’re against water, and now they’re against Dihydrogenated Nitrogen Monoxide?

    Now you’ve done it. Are you insisting on chemistry over sincerity? If so, more carbons could be released into the environment to recycle and reprint signs. That will only make the drought worse!

    ;-)

    • #10
  11. user_199279 Coolidge
    user_199279
    @ChrisCampion

    So Californians are now proud that they’ve supported policies (for decades, which is why a Hetch-Hetchy part 2 was never built) that are now, in no exaggerated fashion, taking water out of the taps in their homes.  And giving it to 2-inch delta smelt.

    They shouldn’t call it Californication.  They should call it Thirstification.  California is Progressivism writ very, very large.

    • #11
  12. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    spock

    It’s not logical. It’s California.

    • #12
  13. Roberto Inactive
    Roberto
    @Roberto

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.:I ask again: Now will they get it?

    Priorities my friend, priorities after all we cannot have this water nonsense distracting from far more important goals:

    Panel backs Medi-Cal coverage for those here illegally

    A lawmaker’s proposal to offer Medi-Cal coverage to immigrants living in the country without documentation made it through a key legislative committee Thursday, although the bill was significantly scaled back to benefit primarily those ages 19 and under…Among the bills making it through were proposals to raise the minimum smoking age to 21, allow doctors to prescribe life-ending medications to terminal patients wishing to hasten their deaths, raise the minimum wage to $11 in 2016 and $13 in 2017, and require employers to post workers’ schedules at least two weeks in advance.

    Never forget, in California Moonbeam Jerry counts as the levelheaded Democrat.

    • #13
  14. Kim K. Inactive
    Kim K.
    @KimK

    My California desert town has been ordered to cut water consumption 37% compared to usage 2 years ago. In the past months we’ve cut close to 20%. We supposedly use too much per capita but “they” have not, seemingly, taken into account the fact that this is a a desert and the vast majority of homes are cooled by evaporative coolers. Great for the environment because they don’t use much electricity, but they are useless without water. It was 107 today and the summer has several months to go.

    • #14
  15. blank generation member Inactive
    blank generation member
    @blankgenerationmember

    This is an opportunity here in CA to have a new rallying cry for conservatives:

    “If it’s Brown, flush it down.”

    • #15
  16. MLH Inactive
    MLH
    @MLH

    Jon, they’ll be coming for our (AZ) water soon. Saying this as a former “they.”

    I was hoping that an increase in the price of arugula would make them see sense but I have a hunch that at least 80% of arugula is grown in Yuma.

    • #16
  17. Z in MT Member
    Z in MT
    @ZinMT

    This could all be solved by letting there be a real market in water. The state and cities should auction their water resources to the highest bidder every year. If the Federal government want to protect the delta smelt they can buy water off of the agricultural users fair and square.

    • #17
  18. user_348375 Member
    user_348375
    @

    Crisis.  Nothing else matters.  Moonbeam now has unlimited authority to beleaguer citizens, without benefit of democratic process.  Guess who will suffer most?

    • #18
  19. lesserson Member
    lesserson
    @LesserSonofBarsham

    I have to admit, having talked with plenty of people who live in California, and I’ve never understood the logic behind their choice of weather over culture.

    I know, I know, not everybody there is a raving leftist nutter, but I still wouldn’t live there if it tripled my salary.

    (edit: I make exceptions for those who were born there or lived there before it went crazy. Home is home, I get that. )

    • #19
  20. Ricochet Member
    Ricochet
    @

    Kim K.:My California desert town has been ordered to cut water consumption 37% compared to usage 2 years ago. In the past months we’ve cut close to 20%. We supposedly use too much per capita but “they” have not, seemingly, taken into account the fact that this is a a desert and the vast majority of homes are cooled by evaporative coolers. Great for the environment because they don’t use much electricity, but they are useless without water. It was 107 today and the summer has several months to go.

    I’d love to know what the kWh price is for electricity in CA. Because if the price has gotten low enough, the local water and electric utilities should be able to do some swapout mechanism to get you to trade in the evaporative cooler for another, more electricity-oriented AC.

    • #20
  21. David Knights Member
    David Knights
    @DavidKnights

    None of this is new.  I am at a loss to understand why desal plants and water storage towers still don’t dot the land like weeds.  Seems to me an enterprising entrepreneur could get into the business of manufacturing/storing potable water and then selling it to entities that need it at times like this.

    • #21
  22. Kim K. Inactive
    Kim K.
    @KimK

    Not sure about the rates – the SCE bill looks like Greek to me – but judging by the number of panels on people’s roofs around here I’d say the kWh price is high. We’ve had solar for about a year and a half. With net metering the electric company sends us a check at the end of the year.

    • #22
  23. lesserson Member
    lesserson
    @LesserSonofBarsham

    David Knights:None of this is new. I am at a loss to understand why desal plants and water storage towers still don’t dot the land like weeds. Seems to me an enterprising entrepreneur could get into the business of manufacturing/storing potable water and then selling it to entities that need it at times like this.

    True enough. I wonder if the left would freak out if there were something like the XL pipeline were in the works for pumping water out west.

    • #23
  24. Ricochet Member
    Ricochet
    @

    Kim K.:Not sure about the rates – the SCE bill looks like Greek to me – but judging by the number of panels on people’s roofs around here I’d say the kWh price is high. We’ve had solar for about a year and a half. With net metering the electric company sends us a check at the end of the year.

    So if you’re on net metering, you should have no real issues with switching out the evaporative cooler. Something to consider around, oh, November. If you make it that far, considering the forced cutbacks you’re going through.

    • #24
  25. MLH Inactive
    MLH
    @MLH

    Brad2971:

    Kim K.:My California desert town has been ordered to cut water consumption 37% compared to usage 2 years ago. In the past months we’ve cut close to 20%. We supposedly use too much per capita but “they” have not, seemingly, taken into account the fact that this is a a desert and the vast majority of homes are cooled by evaporative coolers. Great for the environment because they don’t use much electricity, but they are useless without water. It was 107 today and the summer has several months to go.

    I’d love to know what the kWh price is for electricity in CA. Because if the price has gotten low enough, the local water and electric utilities should be able to do some swapout mechanism to get you to trade in the evaporative cooler for another, more electricity-oriented AC.

    I don’t think that swamp coolers use that much water or electricity. And the swamp coolers humidify the air just enough to keep sinuses happy. Of course when the humidity hits about 30%, they don’t work. That was about 1 week in the south part of the Mojave.

    • #25
  26. user_444739 Inactive
    user_444739
    @OmidMoghadam

    Sadly, they will not, as a short visit to the  comments section of any lefty site like Salon, NYT, HP etc shows. They have already latched on the evil farmers (you know those villains who use water to grow food!)  as the reason for their plight.

    What I am afraid of are the refugees from CA. Not having learned any lessons on why the once Golden State has become brown under their collective watch, they pick up roots and take their  poor governance ideas to places like Oregon, Washington and Texas and start the experimentation all over again.

    • #26
  27. Ricochet Member
    Ricochet
    @

    Omid Moghadam:Sadly, they will not, as a short visit to the comments section of any lefty site like Salon, NYT, HP etc shows. They have already latched on the evil farmers (you know those villains who use water to grow food!) as the reason for their plight.

    What I am afraid of are the refugees from CA. Not having learned any lessons on why the once Golden State has become brown under their collective watch, they pick up roots and take their poor governance ideas to places like Oregon, Washington and Texas and start the experimentation all over again.

    While there is quite a bit about California that has no real defense, it should be mentioned that a lot of those Californians’ ancestors (throughout the 1940s-early 1990s) came from other places. You know, places like New York, Illinois, Minnesota, etc. Now, one can definitely make a case that Illinois has had continually putrid Combine “governance,” but please explain NY and MN.

    • #27
  28. Ricochet Member
    Ricochet
    @OldBathos

    California does not want to permit power plant construction and has tried to demand that other states provide their power surpluses at a price set by California politicians.

    California required custom gasoline blends for each region but does not permit construction of the requisite refining capacities.  Louisiana and Texas are supposed to do that for them.

    California drives out its own producers and taxpayers and expects the rest of the US to provide for the illegals who replace them.

    California refused to build the water storage and delivery system that was clearly needed.  Now I suppose they will demand a pipeline from the Great Lakes.  I have no reason to expect there will be lessons learned and sound policies forthcoming in California.  Ever.

    • #28
  29. Ricochet Member
    Ricochet
    @

    Old Bathos:California does not want to permit power plant construction and has tried to demand that other states provide their power surpluses at a price set by California politicians.

    California required custom gasoline blends for each region but does not permit construction of the requisite refining capacities. Louisiana and Texas are supposed to do that for them.

    California drives out its own producers and taxpayers and expects the rest of the US to provide for the illegals who replace them.

    California refused to build the water storage and delivery system that was clearly needed. Now I suppose they will demand a pipeline from the Great Lakes. I have no reason to expect there will be lessons learned and sound policies forthcoming in California. Ever.

    You know, Texas tried to obtain some leverage when it came to the provisioning of all the above listed utilities/services for California. Result of said attempt at leverage: Conviction and death of Ken Lay, and imprisonment of Jeffrey Skilling and Andrew Fastow.

    And BTW, unless there is scientific proof that CA’s “winter blend” of gasoline can’t be utilized in, say, North Dakota, is there any reason you can think of why CARB’s standards can’t be the national standards? Doing so would save the consumer and the refining business bundles of cash.

    • #29
  30. Kim K. Inactive
    Kim K.
    @KimK

    MLH:

    Brad2971:

    Kim K

    I don’t think that swamp coolers use that much water or electricity. And the swamp coolers humidify the air just enough to keep sinuses happy. Of course when the humidity hits about 30%, they don’t work. That was about 1 week in the south part of the Mojave.

    The humidity in my house right now is 60%.   The outside humidity is 6%. My sinuses may be happy but my wooden doors are starting a slow swell. Thirty percent outdoor humidity with a swamp cooler is unbearable.

    • #30
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