Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Speech of Political Manliness

 

Leadership is deeds, not speeches (except, one supposes, speeches that take on the force of deeds). The media and Washington-the-place are the problem. The surplus of spirit in the people is the solution. The president should serve something greater than himself — like Washington-the-man going back to his farm, a very Cincinnatus, relinquishing power after fully discharging his duties. Mr. Perry obviously believes he would not shrink in the comparison — he could withstand the gaze of millions, like the poet says.

The exordium of the speech is a brief biography that brings out two related things, the dignity of work and the restlessness of the American race. Americans cannot be satisfied with what they have. Instead, they strive to acquire more, to do better for themselves and by each other. Mr. Perry’s argument is that success for Americans is a confirmation of dignity rather than an alternative to dignity. This is his best argument about bringing the nation together — he would have done better to choose Lincoln for his exemplar, but Washington was manlier. Mr. Perry has much to boast about, to which he is not adverse, and much to be grateful for — his audience can be gratified on both counts, then.

The peroration is comparatively somber. It centers on Vietnam heroes — Medal of Honor recipient Michael Thornton — and Afghanistan and Iraq heroes — Marcus Luttrell and Chris Kyle. See the brave Luttrell brothers behind him — both SEALs, battleborn. (You can see Mr. Marcus Luttrell crack a smile, surprised by the joke about Mr. Carter…) The argument moves from that kind of selfless striving to the selflessness proper for civilians, which is closer to endurance — Mr. Perry talked about Mrs. Taya Kyle and the grief of all those families who have lost loved ones in war. This, of course, is not how liberals think of presidential politics, but most GOP contenders are not keen on it either. It is not a foregone conclusion that manliness is not a political virtue in America — but that proposition seems more plausible than the contrary. It seems, Mr. Perry wants to change that — it seems, he believes America wants a man, not a nice guy. I believe much could be said about the connection between giving people second chances and leadership.

Rights come from God, not government, says Mr. Perry. But he moves on to one of his themes, the social compact between the generations. (The implication seems to be, without a believable promise of progress, society would fall apart.) Military sacrifice protects this social compact. People should judge themselves by the standard of republican virtue, because that is something in which all citizens can share.

Instead, he implies, partisan politics has divided America and the result is that the economy is not working; policy problems, however, can be fixed — the problem goes deeper and is revealed by the catastrophes of foreign policy. The liberal world of Mr. Obama is fantastic; Iraq should not have been abandoned: The war had been won, so the peace should have been secured. Remember Vietnam: Do not let politicians betray the military.

This sequence shows that America really is divided — liberals and conservatives do not see the war in the same way anymore than the economy. How to bring America together? Americans have come together in their rejection of Mr. Obama is the implied answer: To the dislike of Mr. Obama, some are born, some achieve it, and some have it thrust upon them — and they can all vote for Mr. Perry in the upcoming elections.

Naturally, we must wonder about Mr. Perry’s America. But first, we have to see what America was, to see what she is and what she could be, in the happy event. The quality Mr. Perry brings out is the resilience of America — enduring the Civil War, the World Wars, the Great Depression, Mr. Carter — I paraphrase here — and Mr. Obama. America may look incompetent to prevent the greatest political problems, but she will find a way to get through crisis (I might add, unlike any other modern regime). This argument from mere survival contains within itself something far more serious and more questionable: America should be proud of civilization. America does not have to settle for a mediocre economy and rule by bureaucracy. Innovation is the solution. Within the survival of America is concealed the pride and the taste for innovation.

Mr. Perry thus comes around to showing what is good and what is bad. It’s time to create opportunity for everyone, to give everyone a stake in the country, to restore hope to forgotten Americans — millions of middle-class and working Americans who have no hope in the future. Keeping faith with them is good; not keeping faith with them is bad. That is the standard by which political action should be judged in America. This standard has been abandoned. Washington the place is too arrogant. It does not agree that communities are unique, that individuals should be free. Mr. Perry does not return to speak about community, but he has a lot to say about individualism. Individualism is stifled by the regulations which are hurting the economy.

In light of this judgment, the problems of the future can be specified. In his first direct address to a part of the electorate, Mr. Perry addresses the millennials — after all, they are the future: Our generation is passing debt on to your generation. (Again, breaking the social compact.) I will reform entitlements responsibly! Everyone who counts on retirement can rest easy; everyone else has to get serious about reform. Mr. Perry may justify this inequality, but he cannot change it. As for everyone else’s future, Mr. Perry addresses the forgotten Americans in his second direct address: Middle-class life is harder and harder for America: I hear you! I’m gonna do something about it! You are not forgotten! I’m running to be your President. His third, last direct address is to small business: Dodd-Frank is hurting you — but I hear you — your time is coming. Capitalism is not corporatism nor benefits guaranteed without risk — nor yet putting Wall St. above Main St.

Now, we come to Mr. Perry’s America. He says, there is nothing wrong with America today that a change in leadership will not make happen. We’re just a few good decisions away from — I paraphrase here — paradise. Behold tax reform: Loopholes will be eliminated and the corporate tax rates will be lowered. (How the first one can be achieved politically, given the opposition of the few, whose support he needs, or why the second one would really move the people, whose votes he needs, is unclear at best.) Blocking Obama-era regulations. (The Day One promises about stopping the regulatory state are obviously easily done where pending regulations are concerned — but how about everything already done? The suggestion that it was Mr. Obama’s fault as opposed to the logic of the regulatory state is rather unfair.) Building the Keystone pipeline. Energy is the core problem of modern times, wherein we see all that we could do and therefore must do. Mr. Perry has seen energy and has concluded that America could be as successful as Texas.

Witness then the success of Texas. Witness the educational achievements: Texas high-school graduation rates — second in the country; first in graduation rates for blacks and hispanics. Witness border security — which carefully avoid talk about immigration probems — the deployment of the Texas National Guard in 2014. All of this is attributable to Mr. Perry. Texas looks so good it makes the rest of America look bad by comparison — it is the most successful state and without it, America would have lost jobs during Mr. Obama’s administration. He was governor both during the boom and during the bust — the man is equal to unequal times.

But success does nothing to foster indolence or forgetfulness in Mr. Perry. He knows the ugly truth: National security requires strength — the presidency is about defense, basically — there is no peace other than by threatening to kill your enemies and doing it when necessary. Hence, there will be no deal with Iran while Mr. Perry is president.

There are 80 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Ball Diamond Ball Inactive

    This is a crackling good write-up, TT. Thank you and my compliments.

    • #1
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:43 AM PDT
    • Like
  2. Profile Photo Member

    Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    • #2
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:52 AM PDT
    • Like
  3. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    Ball Diamond Ball:This is a crackling good write-up, TT. Thank you and my compliments.

    Thanks for the kind words.

    • #3
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:56 AM PDT
    • Like
  4. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Are you that kid who goes around with some kind of submit to authority slogan? You sound like him–but maybe I shouldn’t jump to conclusions.

    1.Do not let people fool you about the purpose of suspension points. You were looking for a dash.

    2.You’re not qualified to tell me what my writing relies on–you’re making a fool of yourself gratis if you try. I recommend asking people what they mean or believe or suppose.

    3.You’re not qualified to tell anyone what America has been spending time & treasure doing. You’re long on assertions, short on any sense of how questionable they are while questioning the invisible suppositions of writing you do not address as it is. I think kids these days would call that ironic; previously it was called lack of self-awareness.

    4.What in hell has the likelihood of Mr. Perry’s being elected have to do with the goodness of the article, as you might say?

    5.’Humbly submit…’ in your statement is just precious.

    • #4
    • June 5, 2015, at 6:06 AM PDT
    • Like
  5. Casey Way Member
    Casey WayJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon… (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good.

    So, the article is not very good because it doesn’t match your claims which to this point seem mostly opinion?

    Mad Libs works well for this: Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another [Senator, inexperienced executive, Clinton, Bush…] to the Presidency anytime soon…

    Unless you describe why it’s unlikely, it’s unlikely this phrase supports your next claim .

    Two points: GWB approval ratings are highest since 2005. Certain Heroic Man screen portrayals garnered popular and financial success in pop culture this year.

     It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    The time and treasure spent does not get us away from a “Heroic Man theory”, but instead exemplifies it. Despite the politics and strategy overhead for better and for worse, those treasured men and women gave their all in deference to civilian leadership and for our protection. They were not getting away from heroic perceptions, they we’re too busy being heroes.

    I look forward to rebuttal and the support of your specious claims in the comments.

    • #5
    • June 5, 2015, at 6:48 AM PDT
    • Like
  6. Trink Coolidge
    TrinkJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Dang, Titus. This is awesome. I’m going to give Perry another look. I’d written him off. I guiltily admit that I didn’t watch the entirety of his speech and feel even worse that those brothers you identified are American heroes. Dang. On breezing past my husband as he was watching this event – I quipped about those two thuggish-looking fellows standing behind him as hopefully not being his sons, but body-guards. Dang. They’re the best – the manliness necessity – that America produces. Dang. Thank you. (Pardon all the “dangs”, but CoC wouldn’t permit anything more poetic ;)

    • #6
    • June 5, 2015, at 6:52 AM PDT
    • Like
  7. MLH Inactive

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Are you saying that that is a good thing?

    • #7
    • June 5, 2015, at 6:53 AM PDT
    • Like
  8. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    Trink:Dang, Titus. This is awesome. I’m going to give Perry another look. I’d written him off. I guiltily admit that I didn’t watch the entirety of his speech and feel even worse that those brothers you identified are American heroes. Dang. On breezing past my husband as he was watching this event – I quipped about those two thuggish-looking fellows standing behind him as hopefully not being his sons, but body-guards. Dang. They’re the best – the manliness necessity – that America produces. Dang. Thank you. (Pardon all the “dangs”, but CoC wouldn’t permit anything more poetic ;)

    Hello–being that we usually talk about poetry, this is a rather unexpected surprise. Dang will have to do until the CoC sees sense.

    They do look like bodyguards–mean, ugly looks & a kind of tension in them, as though they were waiting to fight hell. They are not handsome or even well-dressed. I’m sure their manners are unattractive. But you are absolutely right that they are proof that America produces manliness & that it serves a good & just cause.

    It is not easy to find something better to say about Mr. Perry than that he, so to speak, adopted Mr. Marcus Luttrell in his time of need. Americans talk about VA or te problems of veterans or PTSD; this man took him into his home.

    He is right that deeds matter more than speeches. Without that, people become unable to see heroes, & get pretty boys instead…

    • #8
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:04 AM PDT
    • Like
  9. captainpower Inactive

    Trink:On breezing past my husband as he was watching this event – I quipped about those two thuggish-looking fellows standing behind him as hopefully not being his sons, but body-guards.

    You aren’t alone.

    I didn’t know what Marcus Luttrell looked like even though I’d seen the movie Lone Survivor (never read the book though).

    Apparently, Rick Perry and his wife were there when Luttrell needed someone.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGiwOOUlwpY

    • #9
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:05 AM PDT
    • Like
  10. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    captainpower:

    Trink:On breezing past my husband as he was watching this event – I quipped about those two thuggish-looking fellows standing behind him as hopefully not being his sons, but body-guards.

    You aren’t alone.

    I didn’t know what Marcus Luttrell looked like even though I’d seen the movie Lone Survivor (never read the book though).

    Apparently, Perry was there when Luttrell needed someone.

    Wow, that’s a bit surprising for people who are supposed to do political reporting. Otherwise, people would not know–he’s not a public figure–if I did not write about movies, if I did not have a special interest in American war movies, I would not know either.

    By the way, it’s a good book–he talks about the training more than Chris Kyle does. Both of them seem to have been quite supportive of Mr. W. Bush. & the story of Operation Red Wing is worth reading, one terrible detail after another. Well, you can listen to the audiobook. This should be a gift for any kid who likes adventure…

    • #10
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:16 AM PDT
    • Like
  11. Trink Coolidge
    TrinkJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    captainpower:

    Trink:On breezing past my husband as he was watching this event – I quipped about those two thuggish-looking fellows standing behind him as hopefully not being his sons, but body-guards.

    You aren’t alone.

    Captainpower. Thank you for providing those good – and powerful links.

    • #11
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:24 AM PDT
    • Like
  12. Ball Diamond Ball Inactive

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Yeah, I’m gonna have to ask if you could just, um, SALUTE THE UNLIKELY, AND HONOR THE HEROIC. That would be greeeeat.

    • #12
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:33 AM PDT
    • Like
  13. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    Ball Diamond Ball:

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Yeah, I’m gonna have to ask if you could just, um, SALUTE THE UNLIKELY, AND HONOR THE HEROIC. That would be greeeeat.

    Yeah, I thought it was that kid. People on Ricochet happily do not treat people to imperatives & slogans a lot, so at first I thought it was endearing to see someone issuing orders like my young niece does. Then, it turns out, some people took him seriously, & took offense. I guess I’ll have to make sure my niece learns manners…

    • #13
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:37 AM PDT
    • Like
  14. Casey Way Member
    Casey WayJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Quick shout out to Morgan. Marcus commands most of the attention deservedly. But I imagine, as with most of the special forces, he has quite a few of his own impressive stories not yet to be publicized for various reasons. God Bless the mothers of such men.

    • #14
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:42 AM PDT
    • Like
  15. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    Casey Way:Quick shout out to Morgan. Marcus commands most of the attention deservedly. But I imagine, as with most of the special forces, he has quite a few of his own impressive stories not yet to be publicized for various reasons. God Bless the mothers of such men.

    Well said. They all have stories–but even the ones who do write about their deeds are reluctant–I suppose most warriors are these days, but this was not always so-

    • #15
    • June 5, 2015, at 7:48 AM PDT
    • Like
  16. The (apathetic) King Prawn Inactive

    Is there something of a crisis going on with our understanding and/or need of manliness in this nation? I think there is. Pajamaboy could not/would not ever stand before our enemies. This being the likely case, how do you think Perry’s manliness will be received?

    • #16
    • June 5, 2015, at 9:34 AM PDT
    • Like
  17. captainpower Inactive

    Titus Techera:Well said. They all have stories–but even the ones who do write about their deeds are reluctant–I suppose most warriors are these days, but this was not always so-

    When was it not so in America?

    I’ve heard stories of WWII veterans being reluctant to talk about war because 1) war is horrific 2) they are modest. In my own extended family, a grandfather died and his war medals were found afterward, yet no one had been told that he had received them.

    We had movies made about war heroes like Sergeant York and Audie Murphy, but my impression was that they were made into war heroes reluctantly, finally embracing the role after much convincing.

    On the other hand, I have heard that Chris Kyle wasn’t especially reticent or modest. (And we are better for having heard his story. IMO, American Sniper was the Iraq War reporting of Michael Totten, Michael Yon, Bill Roggio, etc. all wrapped into a neat little 2-hour movie for normal people who don’t spend a decade reading blogs about this stuff.)

    • #17
    • June 5, 2015, at 10:05 AM PDT
    • Like
  18. Bob Thompson Member

    If someone has a life experience that closely parallels another’s and delivers a speech in which everything he says or touches on would have been how that other would have said those things, how can he not win unqualified support in his quest for the Presidency? Always had him high on my preferred list, but now he stands out.

    • #18
    • June 5, 2015, at 10:06 AM PDT
    • Like
  19. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    The King Prawn:Is there something of a crisis going on with our understanding and/or need of manliness in this nation? I think there is. Pajamaboy could not/would not ever stand before our enemies. This being the likely case, how do you think Perry’s manliness will be received?

    I think, not well. That is unfortunate & I am frankly only now thinking about what could be done.

    My sense is, the newer Americans get, the softer they get. Innovation carries this within it, although people will not confess it. Perhaps the age of heroes is passing away. A lot of that is good–crime rates are going down, there is more understanding & less harshness to all sorts of people who previously faced really ugly stuff, & anyway, civilization depends more on moderation than courage–more on womanly than manly virtue. But now we have people believing that manliness & war are something you can destroy. It is not that heroes will not suffice for civilization–but that civilization requires their doom. That is a disaster.

    Mr. Perry is no Washington, but the times are different, too. I think, if he really has learned to stand up for America & talk up the dignity of striving–not Silicon Valley ruthlessness without manliness, but a politically acceptable form of manliness–manliness fit for democracy–then he will make a great impact in this generation. I believe this man should make the effort. I think he owes it to his country. Who else will?

    • #19
    • June 5, 2015, at 10:09 AM PDT
    • Like
  20. Bob Thompson Member

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Where are you? Are you not up to extending and defending your point of view?

    • #20
    • June 5, 2015, at 10:19 AM PDT
    • Like
  21. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    captainpower:

    Titus Techera:Well said. They all have stories–but even the ones who do write about their deeds are reluctant–I suppose most warriors are these days, but this was not always so-

    When was it not so in America?

    I’ve heard stories of WWII veterans being reluctant to talk about war because 1) war is horrific 2) they are modest. In my own extended family, a grandfather died and his war medals w ere found afterward, yet no one had been told that he had received them.

    I agree with this. But remember the prestige of at least famous soldiers–not just Grant & Sherman & their memoirs. But remember the awe in which Washington was held.

    I think democracy does this. For example, Mr. Perry says in this speech–his father flew missions over Europe–tail gunner, I think. Then he went back to being a cotton farmer in dry land. Now that’s an astounding move…

    We had movies made about war heroes like Sergeant York and Audie Murphy, but my impression was that they were made into war heroes reluctantly, finally embracing the role after much convincing.

    There is some truth to that.

    I have heard that Chris Kyle wasn’t especially reticent or modest.

    Yeah.

    (And we are better for having heard his story. IMO, American Sniper was the Iraq War reporting of Michael Totten, Michael Yon, Bill Roggio, etc. all wrapped into a neat little 2-hour movie for normal people .)

    Exactly right.

    • #21
    • June 5, 2015, at 10:25 AM PDT
    • Like
  22. Ross C Member
    Ross CJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Enough about the article, did anyone notice the rather large and ominous identical twins bookending the governor? Am I wrong?

    I think this could be a Bond villain thing…wait a minute… FEMALE twin bodyguards. Yeah, that’s the ticket.

    • #22
    • June 5, 2015, at 10:48 AM PDT
    • Like
  23. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera

    Ross C:Enough about the article, did anyone notice the rather large and ominous identical twins bookending the governor? Am I wrong?

    I think this could be a Bond villain thing…wait a minute… FEMALE twin bodyguards. Yeah, that’s the ticket.

    They’re Navy SEALs, the twins.Yes, everyone noticed them. Apparently, no one knows them. Mr. Perry seems to have made quite an effort to help out one of them, Mr. Marcus Luttrell, who seems to have had a very hard time getting back to civilization after he was rescued in Afghanistan, after operation Red Wings went really bad–see Lone Survivor. I believe that’s why the brothers are so close to Mr. Perry.

    • #23
    • June 5, 2015, at 11:21 AM PDT
    • Like
  24. Profile Photo Member

    Bob Thompson:

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Where are you? Are you not up to extending and defending your point of view?

    Good to meet you. Sad to see you are in need of a Texas “man’s man” to run for, and win, the Presidency in an era where this nation’s people (especially its Social Conservatives) can manage just fine without one.

    If Marcus Luttrell wants to go into politics, that’s his business, though I think his time is better served in other areas.

    • #24
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:16 PM PDT
    • Like
  25. Concretevol Thatcher

    I knew who they were but I’m wierd that way. It was extremely funny when liberal reporters on Twitter thought they were being funny by making fun of them during the speech, only to be ridiculed for showing their collective asses. :)

    • #25
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:17 PM PDT
    • Like
  26. John Walker Contributor

    He’ll do.

    He isn’t my first choice, but he speaks to people over the gatekeepers.

    • #26
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:19 PM PDT
    • Like
  27. Bob Thompson Member

    Brad2971:

    Bob Thompson:

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Where are you? Are you not up to extending and defending your point of view?

    Good to meet you. Sad to see you are in need of a Texas “man’s man” to run for, and win, the Presidency in an era where this nation’s people (especially its Social Conservatives) can manage just fine without one.

    If Marcus Luttrell wants to go into politics, that’s his business, though I think his time is better served in other areas.

    Wow! I understand your first sentence, after that I’m lost, totally.

    • #27
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:29 PM PDT
    • Like
  28. Ball Diamond Ball Inactive

    Bob Thompson:

    Brad2971:

    Bob Thompson:

    Brad2971:Actually, when you consider the unlikeliness of electing another Texan to the Presidency anytime soon (I’ll humbly submit we’ll elect another Californian before another Texan, and a Floridian before both of them), this article is…not very good. It relies too much on Heroic Man theory that this nation spent a fair amount of time and treasure getting away from.

    Where are you? Are you not up to extending and defending your point of view?

    Good to meet you. Sad to see you are in need of a Texas “man’s man” to run for, and win, the Presidency in an era where this nation’s people (especially its Social Conservatives) can manage just fine without one.

    If Marcus Luttrell wants to go into politics, that’s his business, though I think his time is better served in other areas.

    Wow! I understand your first sentence, after that I’m lost, totally.

    You’re not missing anything.

    • #28
    • June 5, 2015, at 5:49 PM PDT
    • Like
  29. The Reticulator Member

    The quality Mr. Perry brings out is the resilience of America — enduring the Civil War, the World Wars, the Great Depression, Mr. Carter — I paraphrase here — and Mr. Obama

    America may have been resilient enough to endure all of the above, but I question whether it is resilient enough to survive Bill Clinton or ObamaCare.

    • #29
    • June 5, 2015, at 6:36 PM PDT
    • Like
  30. Manny Member

    I loved it. That was a great speech, and he hit the values themes. I had settled on Jeb but this is a very strong. It’s now a toss up for me between the two.

    • #30
    • June 5, 2015, at 6:53 PM PDT
    • Like

Comments are closed because this post is more than six months old. Please write a new post if you would like to continue this conversation.