C. S. Lewis Weighs in on Hillary

 

queen hillaryYes, the great C. S. Lewis died in 1963.  And that makes it all the more amazing that he provides a crystal clear portrayal of Hillary in The Magician’s Nephew.  You may recall the scene where Hillary… excuse me, Jadis of Charn — the evil sorceress who eventually kills Aslan — explains to Digory why she must possess complete power, and why she must be above the law.

I had forgotten that you are only a common boy. How could you understand reasons of State? You must learn, child, that what would be wrong for you or for any of the common people is not wrong in a great Queen such as I. The weight of the world is on our shoulders. We must be freed from all rules. Ours is a high and lonely destiny.

Is this not accurate? Hillary makes laws, but she has no need to obey them. Why? Because it is her “high and lonely destiny” to hold power.  Laws only stand in her way. Like good little children, we must be taught to take our medicine. It’s good for us.

Once again, I feel the urge to cry for our country.

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  1. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    tabula rasa: Once again, I feel the urge to cry for our country.

    New rivers are springing forth each day.

    • #1
  2. Misthiocracy Member
    Misthiocracy
    @Misthiocracy

    As a loyal subject of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, I find this post insulting to genuine queens.  Heck, I bet my Queen pays her taxes more faithfully than Hillary does!  ;-)

    • #2
  3. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasa
    @tabularasa

    Misthiocracy:As a loyal subject of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, I find this post insulting to genuine queens. Heck, I bet my Queen pays her taxes more faithfully than Hillary does! ;-)

    I blame C. S. Lewis.  Crazy Irishman.

    • #3
  4. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    No despair, TR. She ain’t been crowned yet.

    • #4
  5. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasa
    @tabularasa

    Percival:No despair, TR.She ain’t been crowned yet.

    I know, and agree, but the mere fact that so many Americans think she should be president is itself deeply depressing.

    I’m all for a woman president, but not that woman.

    • #5
  6. blank generation member Inactive
    blank generation member
    @blankgenerationmember

    I don’t think this is the correct literary reference.  I’m not the first to observe that the Snopes family from Faulkner is the way to look at it.  Admittedly I’ve only read The Hamlet, but its all about what you can get over someone.

    • #6
  7. Indaba Member
    Indaba
    @

    Brilliantly put, as usual, Tabula.

    The Queen wa such a frightening character as she was so attractive and powerful and it sounded so rational.

    • #7
  8. Songwriter Inactive
    Songwriter
    @user_19450

    Wonderful comparison, TR.

    • #8
  9. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasa
    @tabularasa

    blank generation member:I don’t think this is the correct literary reference. I’m not the first to observe that the Snopes family from Faulkner is the way to look at it. Admittedly I’ve only read The Hamlet, but its all about what you can get over someone.

    I can agree so long as we stipulate that Hillary is Ab Snopes.

    • #9
  10. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    tabula rasa:

    blank generation member:I don’t think this is the correct literary reference. I’m not the first to observe that the Snopes family from Faulkner is the way to look at it. Admittedly I’ve only read The Hamlet, but its all about what you can get over someone.

    I can agree so long as we stipulate that Hillary is Ab Snopes.

    And Bill is Ike Snopes?

    • #10
  11. Nanda Panjandrum Member
    Nanda Panjandrum
    @

    I’all bring the tissues, TR…

    • #11
  12. user_494971 Contributor
    user_494971
    @HankRhody

    tabula rasa: Yes, the great C. S. Lewis died in 1963. And that makes it all the more amazing that he provides a crystal clear portrayal of Hillary in The Magician’s Nephew.

    Read this out loud to my roommate, adding “That’s got to be the meanest thing I’ve ever heard someone say.

    He replied “I know. Totally unfair to the Queen from the Magician’s Nephew.”

    • #12
  13. Ross C Member
    Ross C
    @RossC

    I have also been mulling over this concept of Queen Hillary and I think it is a very apt one.  She is plagued by scandal, above the law and common morality, an extremely rich person via entitlement only, and out of touch with the ordinary American will hopefully doom her candidacy.

    • #13
  14. Pencilvania Inactive
    Pencilvania
    @Pencilvania

    Excuse my ignorance, I didn’t read the book – but what happens to the Queen eventually?  Is she overthrown?

    And does it involve emails?

    • #14
  15. AUMom Member
    AUMom
    @AUMom

    Pencilvania:Excuse my ignorance, I didn’t read the book – but what happens to the Queen eventually? Is she overthrown?

    And does it involve emails?

    It does not involve emails. She is finally overthrown but not before ruling Narnia for many years where it was “always winter but never Christmas.”

    • #15
  16. Pencilvania Inactive
    Pencilvania
    @Pencilvania

    Augh. That’s just awful.

    • #16
  17. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    Actually, Hillary! (TM) reminds me more of the Lady of the Green Kirtle from “The Silver Chair.”  Remember the following passage from the book?  It is pure Hillary! (TM):

    “What is this sun that you all speak of? Do you mean anything by the word?”

    “Yes, we jolly well do,” said Scrubb.

    “Can you tell me what it’s like?” asked the Witch (thrum, thrum, thrum, went the strings).

    “Please it your Grace,” said the Prince, very coldly and politely. “You see that lamp. It is round and yellow and gives light to the whole room; and hangeth moreover from the roof. Now that thing which we call the sun is like the lamp, only far greater and brighter. It giveth light to the whole Overworld and hangeth in the sky.”

    “Hangeth from what, my lord?” asked the Witch; and then, while they were all still thinking how to answer her, she added, with another of her soft, silver laughs: “You see? When you try to think out clearly what this sun must be, you cannot tell me. You can only tell me it is like the lamp. Your sun is a dream; and there is nothing in that dream that was not copied from the lamp. The lamp is the real thing; the sun is but a tale, a children’s story.”

    “Yes, I see now,” said Jill in a heavy, hopeless tone. “It must be so.” And while she said this, it seemed to her to be very good sense.

    Slowly and gravely the Witch repeated, “There is no sun.” And they all said nothing. She repeated, in a softer and deeper voice. “There is no sun.” After a pause, and after a struggle in their minds, all four of them said together. “You are right. There is no sun.” It was such a relief to give in and say it.

    “There never was a sun,” said the Witch.

    “No. There never was a sun,” said the Prince, and the Marsh-wiggle, and the children.

    Seawriter

    • #17
  18. user_57140 Member
    user_57140
    @KarenHumiston

    I love the scene in The Magician’s Nephew where the wicked and clueless Uncle Andrew fawns on Jadis in smitten admiration (“Dem fine woman!  A dem fine woman!”)  while everyone with a brain and any sense of morality looks on in horror.  Hillary Clinton: a”dem fine woman!”

    • #18
  19. Hartmann von Aue Member
    Hartmann von Aue
    @HartmannvonAue

    At least Jadis was pretty, by all accounts. I kid of course, TR. The description of Charn though, along with the scene in That Hideous Strength in which the bull dyke policewoman has Jane stripped and tortures her earn C.S. Lewis my vote for horror author of the 20th century. The cheap, gore-driven theatrics of Clive Barker and Ramsey Campbell seem puerile by comparison.

    As for HRC: I don’t think she’s going to be healthy enough to run in another 16 months.

    • #19
  20. DrewInWisconsin Coolidge
    DrewInWisconsin
    @DrewInWisconsin

    This was a common theme for Lewis. It imbues much of his “Space Trilogy,” too. If I had some time, I’d look up the similar passages from “Out of the Silent Planet” and “That Hideous Strength.” 

    • #20
  21. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    Royals

    • #21
  22. Ricochet Inactive
    Ricochet
    @GoldwatersRevenge

    My question is what act short of cold bloodied murder before a bevy of unimpeachable witnesses would make her unfit for office in the minds of her rabid followers. Every new Clinton scandal is seen only as as a ploy by evil Republicans, throwing mud at the ceiling, hoping someday it will stick. The Queen rides in a bullet proof carriage.

    • #22
  23. user_170953 Inactive
    user_170953
    @WilliamLaing

    [Digory realise that uncle Andrew was saying ‘ours is a high and lonely destiny’ – the same thing as Queen Jadis]. “but it did not sound nearly as impressive now, possibly because Uncle Andrew was not seven feet tall and dazzlingly beautiful.” The former Secretary of State suffers by comparison in much the same way as Uncle Andrew did.

    • #23
  24. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    Perfect comparison.

    I would love to see on Facebook the picture of crowned Hillary that you have for this post, or EJHill’s picture, with the C.S. Lewis quote (“The weight of the world…..”) added under “Ready for Queen Hillary.”

    • #24
  25. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasa
    @tabularasa

    Seawriter:Actually, Hillary! (TM) reminds me more of the Lady of the Green Kirtle from “The Silver Chair.” Remember the following passage from the book? It is pure Hillary! (TM):

    “What is this sun that you all speak of? Do you mean anything by the word?”

    “Yes, we jolly well do,” said Scrubb.

    “Can you tell me what it’s like?” asked the Witch (thrum, thrum, thrum, went the strings).

    “Please it your Grace,” said the Prince, very coldly and politely. “You see that lamp. It is round and yellow and gives light to the whole room; and hangeth moreover from the roof. Now that thing which we call the sun is like the lamp, only far greater and brighter. It giveth light to the whole Overworld and hangeth in the sky.”

    “Hangeth from what, my lord?” asked the Witch; and then, while they were all still thinking how to answer her, she added, with another of her soft, silver laughs: “You see? When you try to think out clearly what this sun must be, you cannot tell me. You can only tell me it is like the lamp. Your sun is a dream; and there is nothing in that dream that was not copied from the lamp. The lamp is the real thing; the sun is but a tale, a children’s story.”

    “Yes, I see now,” said Jill in a heavy, hopeless tone. “It must be so.” And while she said this, it seemed to her to be very good sense.

    Slowly and gravely the Witch repeated, “There is no sun.” And they all said nothing. She repeated, in a softer and deeper voice. “There is no sun.” After a pause, and after a struggle in their minds, all four of them said together. “You are right. There is no sun.” It was such a relief to give in and say it.

    “There never was a sun,” said the Witch.

    “No. There never was a sun,” said the Prince, and the Marsh-wiggle, and the children.

    Seawriter

    Excellent.  Lewis seems prophetic.

    • #25
  26. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasa
    @tabularasa

    DrewInWisconsin:This was a common theme for Lewis. It imbues much of his “Space Trilogy,” too. If I had some time, I’d look up the similar passages from “Out of the Silent Planet” and “That Hideous Strength.”

    And not only his fiction.  Lewis wrote often, and with great derision, of the intellectual elites and bureaucrats of the modern omnicompetent, omnipresent state.  He hated concentrations of power and those who seek that power, once concentrated.

    • #26
  27. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasa
    @tabularasa

    AUMom:

    Pencilvania:Excuse my ignorance, I didn’t read the book – but what happens to the Queen eventually? Is she overthrown?

    And does it involve emails?

    It does not involve emails. She is finally overthrown but not before ruling Narnia for many years where it was “always winter but never Christmas.”

    And doesn’t that sound consistent with Hillary’s dour personality?  She would happily cancel Christmas if she could be president.

    • #27
  28. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    tabula rasa:

    She would happily cancel Christmas if she could be president.

    Nah. She’d keep it, but ban gift-giving, parties, and elaborate dinners to underscore her ability to make your life miserable.

    Seawriter

    • #28
  29. AUMom Member
    AUMom
    @AUMom

    Should Hillary ever get her hands on wand that turns folks to stone, we are all going to be in trouble.

    • #29
  30. RedRules Inactive
    RedRules
    @RedRules

    Isn’t that guy white?! I am just feeling so triggered right now…..

    • #30

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