Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Listen to the leadership, obey orders, comply with regulations, and keep secrets

 

Not too long ago, I took a trip on a container ship from Seattle to Shanghai. You can see some photos of it on my old blog, if you’re a container ship travel nut. I went with my friend and fellow Ricochet contributor Mike Murphy, and we had an amazing time. Except for the storms.

When we steamed into Shanghai, though, there was a problem.

Evidently, not too many people arrive in the People’s Republic via container ship.

So as the mess got sorted out — which (surprise!) took $100 in cash — I had time to wander around the customs office. There was an information kiosk with a touchscreen display, and as I tapped my way through the various listings, I came across this screen.

It may be hard to read. It’s the “Code of Professional Ethics” which all customs officers are supposed to follow.

Of course, I agree with all of them. But you should feel free to choose your own favorite. Mine is in bold. All other punctuation (or lack thereof) is original:

Be loyal to the Party

Be steadfast in faith, listen to the command of the Party, protect the Constitution and be loyal to the motherland.

Serve the people

Love the people, be a devoted civil servant, know clearly what to love and what to hate and be committed to eliminating the evils and protecting the good.

Be impartial in law enforcement

Don’t play favoritism. Don’t bow to the high and mighty. It is strictly forbidden to extort confessions. Don’t be wrong or connive at people.

Be just and impartial, clear-handed and clear-headed.

Live plainly and work hard. Work selflessly for the public interest. Guard against corrupting influences and reject bribes. Don’t get influenced or contaminated.

Unity and coordination

Have the interest of the whole at heart and do one’s utmost to cooperate. Respect each other and support each other.

Be prepared to sacrifice one’s life

Be dedicated to one’s duty and skilled and proficient in one’s work. Be intelligent and brave and fear no sacrifice

Strictly observe discipline

Listen to the leadership, obey orders, comply with regulations and keep secrets.

Perform one’s duties in a civilized manner

Be modest and prudent. Don’t make a show of one’s authority. Treat people politely and be neat and tidy in appearance.

Listen to the leadership, obey orders, comply with regulations, and keep secrets. Sort of describes the relationship most of the news media have with the Obama administration, don’t you think?

There are 7 comments.

  1. James Poulos Contributor

    No Code of Professional Ethics is complete, Rob, without this commandment — slipped pretty sneakily, I think, into a hard-to-skim part of the list:

    Don’t be wrong

    A lesson to the media, the administration, and us all.

    • #1
    • May 30, 2010, at 1:05 AM PDT
    • Like
  2. Profile Photo Member
    James Poulos: No Code of Professional Ethics is complete, Rob, without this commandment — slipped pretty sneakily, I think, into a hard-to-skim part of the list:

    Don’t be wrong

    A lesson to the media, the administration, and us all. · May 29 at 1:05pm

    That’s a bit like “Don’t be evil”– and we all know how that one went.

    • #2
    • May 30, 2010, at 2:06 AM PDT
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  3. Joe Escalante Contributor

    They had me at motherland. Where do I sign up? It’s kind of a poor man’s Vatican document though. I’m sure the same author also pens the encyclicals for the CPCA.

    • #3
    • May 30, 2010, at 4:57 AM PDT
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  4. FeliciaB Inactive

    Who says communism is a-religious? The list reads like a pastor’s pledge as he takes over pastoring a church…

    • #4
    • May 30, 2010, at 5:02 AM PDT
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  5. Ottoman Umpire Inactive

    “Be loyal to the party” could have been the motto of my fraternity…

    • #5
    • May 30, 2010, at 6:15 AM PDT
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  6. Duane Oyen Member

    FeliciaB: Who says communism is a-religious? The list reads like a pastor’s pledge as he takes over pastoring a church… · May 29 at 5:02pm

    Well, when the Nanjing printing outfit published its one-millionth Bible, the local Party leaders all rushed down there to have their pictures taken with the company brass, so I predict that there will be a lot more pastors before long. One friend a bit farther West in China got his parents set up in a Bible study before he headed back to the US so they would have a social group for company.

    The best thing there, though, is the Cultural Revolution Theme restaurant, which pokes fun at everything you have ever read about China under Mao.

    • #6
    • May 30, 2010, at 10:02 AM PDT
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  7. Melanie Graham Contributor

    Oddly enough, “Listen to the leadership, obey orders, comply with regulations and keep secrets” is what Rob told me if I wanted to post here.

    • #7
    • June 1, 2010, at 11:55 AM PDT
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