Next of Kim

 

Last week, a decrepit Kim Jong-il took a midnight train from North Korea into China, where he met with Chinese president Hu Jintao in the northern Chinese industrial city of Changchun.The trip had two probable motives. The first was to avoid having to meet Jimmy Carter, who was in Pyongyang to free an American citizen. The Dear Leader can be forgiven his desire to skip an encounter with the world’s most irritating man.The second motive was probably to introduce his son and heir, Kim Jong-un — dubbed Youth Captain — to his Chinese overlords. After a long struggle, a consensus has emerged: Kim Jong-un is the new Kim on the Block. So what do we know about the Youth Captain? Not much. A photo of him as a boy is on the right. Other than that, you know, the usual. From the Chosun-Ilbo:

Those who knew “Pak Un,” the name he used at the Swiss school, say he was indifferent to political issues and never made any anti-American comments. He worshipped basketball players in the NBA. A friend who visited his apartment at #10, Kirchstrasse, Liebefeld, recalls that Kim had a room filled with NBA-memorabilia.

In class, Pak Un was generally shy and awkward with girls, but he became a different person on basketball court, according to his classmates. “A fiercely competitive player,” said classmate Nikola Kovacevic. “He was very explosive. He could make things happen. He was the playmaker.”

Kim also had a collection of Nike sneakers. “We only dreamed about having such shoes. He was wearing them,” recalled Kovacevic, who estimated the price of each pair at around US$200.

Shy and awkward with girls? Loves basketball? We can work with that, right? May I suggest Special Envoys to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Kobe Bryant?

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  1. Profile Photo Member
    @ScottR

    Kim Jong “il” being succeeded by Kim Jong “un” to threaten us with a missile called the “no dong.” Just can’t take these people seriously.

    • #1
  2. Profile Photo Podcaster
    @EJHill
    Rob Long May I suggest Special Envoys to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Kobe Bryant? ·

    Think strategic. David Robinson, Annapolis ’87.

    • #2
  3. Profile Photo Inactive
    @HumzaAhmad

    I think the real question is not who the new Kim is or how he will “govern”, but what power he or his father ever actually wielded over the DPRK’s policies. Over the years, numerous DPRK watchers have debunked the common belief that Kim Jong-il and the DPRK regime are simply crazy nationalist-communist zealots, which means that there is a method to the madness. What we need to know in order to make good DPRK policy is what role the current Kim played in creating and implementing that method, and whether that role will ultimately be diminished or possibly enhanced by the new Kim. And to the extent that either Kim is not involved and there are others calling at least some of the shots, who are they and how do we pull their levers to affect policy changes?

    • #3
  4. Profile Photo Member
    @JimmyCarter

    We should relocate the U.N. headquarters here

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryugyong_Hotel

    • #4
  5. Profile Photo Thatcher
    @StevenPotter
    EJHill

    Rob Long May I suggest Special Envoys to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Kobe Bryant? ·

    Think strategic. David Robinson, Annapolis ’87. · Aug 31 at 6:44am

    Sounds like a job for The Dream Team. I’m thinking the Class of 1992.

    • #5
  6. Profile Photo Member
    @
    Rob Long […] We can work with that, right? May I suggest Special Envoys to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Kobe Bryant?

    Whoa, Rob, do you want to accelerate Kim Jong-un’s progress down the path to megalomania? If the guy already knows how to play basketball, that’s the only thing I can imagine Kobe teaching!

    • #6

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