Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Cut Me to the Quik

 

LA schools have decided to ban “flavored milk,” permitting only milk-flavored milk. The issue, of course, is childhood obesity. Flavored milk has extra sugar. Regular milk is healthier. Don’t even ask about menthol milk; it’s been banned for years. This objection by a school board member makes sense to any parent who’s ever read the nutritional label:

(Galatzan) noted the district serves fruit juices containing 27 to 29 grams of sugar per serving, more than the amount of sugar in flavored milk – 20 grams in 8 ounces of fat-free chocolate milk and 27 grams in fat-free strawberry.

But it’s juice! Therefore it’s healthy, especially if it’s organic, and the fruit was fertilized with night-soil gathered from free-range goats. Here’s the quote that makes the shoulders sag with an almost inexpressible weariness:

The board’s decision was applauded by several proponents in the audience.

“Thirty percent of our kids are obese or are on track to diabetes,” said Jennie Cook of Food for Lunch, a coalition advocating nutritious school food. She has been pushing the district to eliminate flavored milk for the past year. “This is a social justice issue.”

What isn’t? You could say that calling the grave peril of chocolate milk “a social justice issue” means all the others have been pretty much solved, but of course that’s not the case. Any desirable situation that has not yet come to pass is a “social justice” issue. The more injustices there are, the more we need the firm, wise hand of the State to herd us to a future that’s 47% more just – which will still be 83% more unjust than the future beyond that one.

One more point: who’s been serving up pizza and tater tots to the kids for decades? Public schools.  A huge system with standardized menus and big suppliers takes forever to modify. Individual private schools, with vouchers for all, would be much more nimble and responsive, and serve the students and the parents much more efficiently.

Assuming that’s the goal of modern education, of course.

There are 35 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Translucent Chum Inactive

    How long before we hear of DOE swat teams taking down kids with baggies of Nestle Quik hidden in their backpacks…

    • #1
    • June 15, 2011, at 11:45 AM PDT
    • Like
  2. Jack Richman Member
    Jack RichmanJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Assume away.

    • #2
    • June 15, 2011, at 11:45 AM PDT
    • Like
  3. Casey Inactive

    “Thirty percent of our kids are obese…”

    My kids are my own. I’m not sharing.

    • #3
    • June 15, 2011, at 11:45 AM PDT
    • Like
  4. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasaJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    James: Thanks for ruining my day. My oldest daughter has three boys (7, 4, and 2). We go with some degree of regularity to McDonald’s where I buy each a Happy Meal (with toy included), and–I shudder to mention it–each of them always wants chocolate milk. I’ve been buying it for them, and they’ve been drinking it.

    None are obese (or anything like it), so I haven’t worried about that. But to find out that I’ve not only been a bad grandfather but have committed an act of “social injustice” hits me where it hurts.

    Should I be in jail?

    While I’m in a confessional mood, let me also say that I recently ran my home sprinkling system during the day (we’re supposed to run them at night). Your thoughts: is this another act of social injustice or is it merely a sacrilege to Gaia? I need some spiritual guidance.

    • #4
    • June 15, 2011, at 11:46 AM PDT
    • Like
  5. Translucent Chum Inactive

    And will there be a different sentence for powdered Quik vs. liquid Quik?

    • #5
    • June 15, 2011, at 11:46 AM PDT
    • Like
  6. tabula rasa Member
    tabula rasaJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member
    James Lileks:

    “Thirty percent of our kids are obese or are on track to diabetes,” said Jennie Cook of Food for Lunch, a coalition advocating nutritious school food. She has been pushing the district to eliminate flavored milk for the past year. “This is a social justice issue.” ·

    Casey: “Thirty percent of our kids are obese…”

    My kids are my own. I’m not sharing. · Jun 15 at 11:45am

    Great point, Casey. Why doesn’t Jennie Cook teach her own children to drink regular milk and let other parents manage their own children’s lives? Probably a silly question: the default setting of liberals is to compel the rest of us to conform to their “enlightened” view of the world. They have a hard time understanding why we aren’t grateful.

    • #6
    • June 16, 2011, at 1:10 AM PDT
    • Like
  7. Palaeologus Inactive

    Jaime Oliver is a tool. Can we deport him at least?

    Misthiocracy: I’ve experimented with mixing plain cocoa with skim milk, but even in a blender it doesn’t mix very well. The cocoa particles don’t dissolve.

    There must be sort of magic going on in store-bought chocolate milk that keeps the solution from separating…. · Jun 15 at 12:29pm

    You ever try making a roux with cocoa powder (in place of flour) & butter?

    That might be worth a shot.

    • #7
    • June 16, 2011, at 1:13 AM PDT
    • Like
  8. Nic Neufeld Inactive

    I’m young enough to remember when chocolate milk started being introduced into schools. Personally I was against it. The kid who lobbied for it was annoyingly sanctimonious about it, and I always, throughout elementary, middle, and high school got the traditional white milk in stubborn protest. I’m not a health nazi by any stretch…if a district wants to serve kids traditional small beer or milk stout more power to em. But I do get annoyed by the idea that sodas are unacceptably unhealthy, but sugar-packed chocolate milk is healthy. Yes, I admit, this is just a decades-old grudge at the smarmy sanctimony of a fellow 4th grader who campaigned for the “right” to have chocolate milk in school.

    • #8
    • June 16, 2011, at 1:28 AM PDT
    • Like
  9. M Tabor Inactive

    I work in the education media, and I’ve been using this example for months to demonstrate how upside-down and twisted priorities are not only in public education, but in the outfits that cover ed. I was saying just yesterday that in April, if you wanted attention for your school or district, all you had to do was tell the local paper that you were banning flavored milk.

    It sounds flippant, but I wasn’t kidding.

    As the latest round of NAEP results have come out, we’ve seen that only about 9% of 4th graders can identify Abraham Lincoln visually (does it get much easier than his image/profile?!). But hey — at least they’ll have 10g less sugar pumping through their historically-illiterate bodies.

    • #9
    • June 16, 2011, at 1:43 AM PDT
    • Like
  10. M Tabor Inactive
    Nic Neufeld: Yes, I admit, this is just a decades-old grudge at the smarmy sanctimony of a fellow 4th grader who campaigned for the “right” to have chocolate milk in school. · Jun 15 at 1:28pm

    Nic, any idea what the kid does with his life now?

    • #10
    • June 16, 2011, at 1:45 AM PDT
    • Like
  11. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western ChauvinistJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Typical leftist stage-one thinking idiocy. Chocolate milk provides some very important nutrients kids need. Think calcium for bone growth, protein for muscle development and, early on, fat for brain development.

    One of my kiddos won’t even eat cereal with plain milk, choosing to eat her mini-wheat cereal dry (oh no! more sugar!! — yeah, but some of the only fiber she’ll eat). She’s smart as a whip and skinny as a rail. And she’s getting her chocolate milk if I have to smuggle it in her stainless steel water bottle every day.

    How about parents take responsibility for their own kids and the buttinskies get out of our kids’ lunch boxes?

    • #11
    • June 16, 2011, at 1:50 AM PDT
    • Like
  12. Diego Sun Devil Inactive

    So, the kids are getting fat by drinking chocolate milk at school, eh? Let’s check the average weight in 10 years. Something tells me it’s the after school diet that’s making them fat far more quickly than the supposedly evil chocolate milk. Just curious, at the end of the meeting, did the busy bodies chant, “One of us! One of us!”?

    • #12
    • June 16, 2011, at 1:53 AM PDT
    • Like
  13. M Tabor Inactive
    Sun Devil Steve: So, the kids are getting fat by drinking chocolate milk at school, eh? Let’s check the average weight in 10 years. Something tells me it’s the after school diet that’s making them fat far more quickly than the supposedly evil chocolate milk. Just curious, at the end of the meeting, did the busy bodies chant, “One of us! One of us!”? · Jun 15 at 1:53pm

    The average kid has about 6 hours of screen time a day, which is made up of computers, television, mobile devices, etc.

    Six. Hours. A. Day. glued to some sort of screen. I know how tough it is to stay healthy — I’m tied to a screen about 12 hours a day.

    And this is the issue — the cafeteria reform advocates say that obesity and poor health comes from 8oz of chocolate milk and ~20g of sugar while ignoring the 1080p elephants in the room.

    • #13
    • June 16, 2011, at 2:23 AM PDT
    • Like
  14. Lucy Pevensie Inactive
    Western Chauvinist: Typical leftist stage-one thinking idiocy. Chocolate milk provides some very important nutrients kids need. Think calcium for bone growth, protein for muscle development and, early on, fat for brain development.

    One of my kiddos won’t even eat cereal with plain milk, choosing to eat her mini-wheat cereal dry (oh no! more sugar!! — yeah, but some of the only fiber she’ll eat). She’s smart as a whip and skinny as a rail. And she’s getting her chocolate milk if I have to smuggle it in her stainless steel water bottle every day.

    How about parents take responsibility for their own kids and the buttinskies get out of our kids’ lunch boxes? · Jun 15 at 1:50pm

    Right there with you, Western Chauvinist. My small, thin child needs that milk and she also needs every calorie we can get into her. We’ve spent our entire lives fighting the (private) school food rules, designed to limit obesity. It’s exhausting and infuriating.

    • #14
    • June 16, 2011, at 2:35 AM PDT
    • Like
  15. Lucy Pevensie Inactive
    Matthew K. Tabor
    Sun Devil Steve: So, the kids are getting fat by drinking chocolate milk at school, eh? Let’s check the average weight in 10 years. Something tells me it’s the after school diet that’s making them fat far more quickly than the supposedly evil chocolate milk.

    The average kid has about 6 hours of screen time a day, which is made up of computers, television, mobile devices, etc.

    Six. Hours. A. Day. glued to some sort of screen. I know how tough it is to stay healthy — I’m tied to a screen about 12 hours a day.

    And this is the issue — the cafeteria reform advocates say that obesity and poor health comes from 8oz of chocolate milk and ~20g of sugar while ignoring the 1080p elephants in the room. · Jun 15 at 2:23pm

    But they’re “safer” indoors than out playing, don’t you know? The poor kids never get to run around the way we did when we were young.

    • #15
    • June 16, 2011, at 2:37 AM PDT
    • Like
  16. Sheila S. Member
    Sheila S.Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I have five children. One of them, my 14 yr old daughter, has a slight weight issue and has been a little chunky from birth. She is built exactly like her paternal grandfather, poor kid. When she tries to eat more healthfully, she is sabotaged by the typical school lunches. There are no salads or fresh fruit or lean choices available to the kids, even in the older grades with a la carte lines. If she wants a low-fat, healthy lunch she has to bring it from home.

    I get so frustrated and angry with the food police who continue to serve pizza with puddles of grease pooling on top, but balk at chocolate milk. Chocolate milk is one of the more benign nutritional evils of the average school lunch, and five meals per week is not what has caused the childhood obesity problem in America. How arrogant of these people to think so.

    • #16
    • June 16, 2011, at 2:43 AM PDT
    • Like
  17. Sheila S. Member
    Sheila S.Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    On the subject of juice, I read a little nutritional tidbit years ago that changed the way I felt about fruit juice (someone please correct me if I am wrong about this!):

    1) Our bodies cannot store Vitamin C, so we need to take in a certain amount of Vitamin C each day.

    2) A small child’s Vitamin C needs are met with 8 oz of apple juice. Anything over that is just sugary sweetness in a cup.

    Took the mommy guilt right out of kool-aid for me!

    Back to milk: Many years ago a friend of mine had a hard time getting her toddler to eat enough and was worried about her health. The little girl wouldn’t drink milk, either. She had offered chocolate milk to no avail – the child heard the word “milk” after the word “chocolate” and wouldn’t even try it. I suggested strawberry Quik and calling it “Pink bunny juice” instead. Worked like a charm, and the child moved from there to trying chocolate milk, and eventually non-flavored milk.

    • #17
    • June 16, 2011, at 2:54 AM PDT
    • Like
  18. Paul A. Rahe Contributor

    Social justice is a misnomer. We owe justice to individuals, not to groups. The minute someone uses the phrase social justice you know that you are being conned.

    • #18
    • June 16, 2011, at 3:28 AM PDT
    • Like
  19. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor
    Misthiocracy:

    I’m no food expert, but surely milk contains enough natural sugars (lactose) that one shouldn’t need to add refined sugar (sucrose) when one makes it all chocolaty-awesome.

    Lactose, while being a sugar, is an extremely unsweet one (like 1/5 as sweet as sucrose), and as JM Rives explained above, cocoa alkaloids are extremely bitter.

    JM gave you great advice. Another tip that might help is to add milk gradually to the cocoa powder, first making a paste, then a slurry, then a beverage, rather than trying to add a small amount of cocoa powder to a large amount of milk. Having a bulky sweetener pre-mixed with the cocoa powder also helps — although if you use Sucralose, it’s too fluffy to make that much of a difference.

    I used to sometimes make myself unsweetened hot cocoa when I was younger, but I never got hooked. A little sweetness just brings out the flavor much more, like a little salt makes food taste more like themselves (a little pinch of salt in your chocolate milk may improve flavor, too).

    Also, whether or no you sweeten, add some vanilla or cinnamon. Your tastebuds will thank you.

    • #19
    • June 16, 2011, at 3:54 AM PDT
    • Like
  20. StickerShock Inactive

    “Or get your kids to pack their own.”

    Yup. This is one more stinging reminder that I’ve been guilty of doing too many things for my kids that they could have been shouldering on their own.

    My son does mow the lawn, rake leaves, and shovel snow, though. He’s not completely pampered.

    • #20
    • June 16, 2011, at 4:55 AM PDT
    • Like
  21. StickerShock Inactive

    This just seems like a no-brainer to me —- pack your kids’ lunches.

    At my kids’ public school the “pizza was cold and the salad was hot.”

    At their private elementary school I volunteered occasionally & found, to my horror, that they didn’t wash the lettuce. (E coli outbreaks are always traced back to lettuce….) And the cleanliness of the kitchen was…..questionable. I also found about five crates of milk cartons that had been delivered in the morning and allowed to sit out in the hot sun for hours. I had to fight the lunch program coordinators to make them throw it out. as they were worried about $$ over the kids’ health.

    It takes only a few minutes to assemble a healthy lunch (and yes, that can include chocolate milk) that includes a piece of fruit, some baby carrots, a sandwich, and something fun. At least when I make the lunch I know that the food preparer washed her hands first.

    • #21
    • June 16, 2011, at 5:24 AM PDT
    • Like
  22. Palaeologus Inactive
    StickerShock: This just seems like a no-brainer to me —- pack your kids’ lunches.

    For now, yes. But nonsense like this tends to keep stretching…

    • #22
    • June 16, 2011, at 6:46 AM PDT
    • Like
  23. Misthiocracy got drunk and Member
    Misthiocracy got drunk andJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member
    Matthew K. Tabor The average kid has about 6 hours of screen time a day, which is made up of computers, television, mobile devices, etc.

    What til they get jobs in the nation’s cubicle farms. That’s a few hours LESS screentime than what I endure.

    • #23
    • June 16, 2011, at 8:16 AM PDT
    • Like
  24. Misthiocracy got drunk and Member
    Misthiocracy got drunk andJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member
    Midget Faded Rattlesnake Then I became a teenager and discovered it was easier to stay slender by skipping lunch altogether.

    I thought snakes only had to eat about once a week or so…

    • #24
    • June 16, 2011, at 8:17 AM PDT
    • Like
  25. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor
    StickerShock: This just seems like a no-brainer to me —- pack your kids’ lunches.

    Or get your kids to pack their own.

    My mom got me to do this during elementary school, and so for a coupla years in a row, I’d eat a mealy apple (Mom got the mealy ones because they were cheaper) with a peanut-butter-and-strawberry-jam sandwich on unevenly-sliced rye bread (Dad didn’t believe in having sliced bread, grape jelly, or sliced deli products in the house, and rye was the easiest thing in the fridge to reach, which explains the odd combination). It tasted awful, but I survived.

    I also faithfully bought white milk instead of chocolate for lunch. My family had successfully scared me into believing Chocolate Milk Was Evil.

    Then I became a teenager and discovered it was easier to stay slender by skipping lunch altogether. (Stupid, maybe. But teens are known for that.)

    One result of being made to drink milk every day as a child: I won’t drink milk anymore. I hardly ever buy the stuff, I’m so sick of it. Would rather have yogurt or cheese.

    • #25
    • June 16, 2011, at 8:44 AM PDT
    • Like
  26. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor
    StickerShock: “Or get your kids to pack their own.”

    Yup. This is one more stinging reminder that I’ve been guilty of doing too many things for my kids that they could have been shouldering on their own.

    Oh, don’t worry ;-) There’s plenty of other stuff Mom wasn’t successful at getting us to do on our own.

    And I was hardly a model kid when it came to doing the chores that were assigned to me, which weren’t burdensome at all in retrospect.

    • #26
    • June 16, 2011, at 11:24 AM PDT
    • Like
  27. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    Er… and what about flavored soy or rice milks?

    Dirty little secret: one reason some kids (and even adults) prefer soy or rice milk to regular milk is these “milks” are typically sweetened and flavored to make them palatable.

    I remember once being put on a dairy- and sugar-free diet by my allergist (for chronic sinus problems). It was extremely hard to find unsweetened soy milk, and when I did find it, it tasted awful. Bleagh!

    • #27
    • June 16, 2011, at 12:02 PM PDT
    • Like
  28. Franz Nisswandt Inactive

    Fruit sugar, interestingly enough, works quite nicely for fattening up bears as they prepare for their annual winter nap (i.e., blueberries).

    Once again, I’m happy to have grown up in Duluth (Mark Twain’s much-aligned arctic zone) back in the late 1960s when the lunch ladies (yes, it was PC back then — and required — to call them lunch ladies) served up “hot lunch” – without nutritional labels – for 35 cents, including the 8 ounce milk. Fast forward to high school in Two Harbors (think: COLDER, up the north shore of Lake Superior) where we bribed the now monikered “lunch attendants” (actually, one nice older woman was affectionately known to our group as “Mom”) to give us extra toastie dogs or pizza slices, and paid the extra fifty cents for the obligatory chocolate malt and EXTRA milk.

    • #28
    • June 16, 2011, at 12:05 PM PDT
    • Like
  29. KC Mulville Inactive

    I propose that we adopt the principle that so long as it’s good for the children, that alone empowers us to trample anyone’s values and impose our expert advice so that all schools and parents must follow our demands.

    After all, it’s for the children.

    • #29
    • June 16, 2011, at 12:08 PM PDT
    • Like
  30. Tommy De Seno Contributor

    James you and I should live dangerously and get together for a couple of chocolate milks.

    You buy.

    If my kids don’t get chocolate milk in the morning they are as mean as when my wife doesn’t get coffee.

    • #30
    • June 16, 2011, at 12:18 PM PDT
    • Like

Comments are closed because this post is more than six months old. Please write a new post if you would like to continue this conversation.