Liberal Mob Claims Another Scalp — Jon Gabriel

 

Brendan Eich, a successful developer and tech legend, was recently named the CEO for Mozilla Corporation. The for-profit venture is most closely associated with their open-source Firefox web browser.

But after his appointment, a dark secret emerged about Eich’s past. Was it embezzlement or child endangerment? Terrorism or even murder? Even worse. Six years ago, he donated $1,000 to California’s Proposition 8, which banned same-sex marriages in the state.

This personal view, which in 2008 was supported by the majority of California voters and President Obama himself, is now a firing offense in the U.S. Under intense pressure from Silicon Valley activists, Eich has stepped down as CEO and also from the board of the nonprofit foundation which wholly owns it.

Mitchell Baker, Executive Chairwoman of Mozilla announced the change on the company’s blog:

Mozilla believes both in equality and freedom of speech. Equality is necessary for meaningful speech. And you need free speech to fight for equality. Figuring out how to stand for both at the same time can be hard.

Our organizational culture reflects diversity and inclusiveness. We welcome contributions from everyone regardless of age, culture, ethnicity, gender, gender-identity, language, race, sexual orientation, geographical location and religious views. Mozilla supports equality for all.

We have employees with a wide diversity of views. Our culture of openness extends to encouraging staff and community to share their beliefs and opinions in public. This is meant to distinguish Mozilla from most organizations and hold us to a higher standard. But this time we failed to listen, to engage, and to be guided by our community.

Of course, this statement utterly contradicts the company’s cowardly submission to a technofascist lynch mob, but that’s beside the point. Diversity is Conformity. Tolerance is Intolerance. Freedom is Slavery.

As the witch hunt grew, Eich insisted that he would not step down. “I don’t want to talk about my personal beliefs because I kept them out of Mozilla all these 15 years we’ve been going,” he said in one interview. “I don’t believe they’re relevant.”

But in a world where the press exposes political donor lists and the IRS demands to know the content of our prayers, the personal is always political. And now, professional.

There are 147 comments.

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  1. Thatcher

    Man, Going to have to switch browsers. But I hate Google too.

    Everyone is a coward in the face to thugs it seems these days.

    I wonder if you could do a comic in which Lex Luthor is an arch villian, not because he has any real crimes, but because he is a John Galt like figure that make money and believes in Truth, Justice and the American way (unlike the Gay Mafia).

    • #1
    • April 3, 2014 at 1:36 pm
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  2. Member

    America. RIP.

    • #2
    • April 3, 2014 at 1:37 pm
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  3. Thatcher

    The Progressives revealed their intention long ago and we refused to listen: The goal is universal forced endorsement of SSM and any objections will be silenced. Accepting the idea that jumping on the social SSM-bandwagon would lead to liberty was self-deception at best.

    They have all the momentum, and moves like this only reward them. They will not stop; they have no decency.

    • #3
    • April 3, 2014 at 1:39 pm
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  4. Member

    It is ironic to me that one of the few public figures that is standing up to Big Brother is Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder. There have been multiple attempts to bully him into changing the team’s name. He is standing fast. He has been subpar as an NFL owner, but I give him credit for standing up to the Liberal Fascists.

    • #4
    • April 3, 2014 at 1:56 pm
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  5. Inactive

    “Our culture of openness extends to encouraging staff and community to share their beliefs and opinions in public.” And then they fired a guy for doing exactly that? What a horrifying joke of an announcement. This is shocking. (Oh, and separate and apart from the tolerance/diversity issue [insert irony observation here], “marriage” is by definition a union of a man and a women. Put that in your inclusiveness pipe and smoke it, left-wing fascists.)

    • #5
    • April 3, 2014 at 1:56 pm
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  6. Contributor

    Where did people ever get the idea that redefining marriage would have bad consequences for a free people?

    • #6
    • April 3, 2014 at 2:01 pm
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  7. Inactive

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    Man, Going to have to switch browsers. But I hate Google too.

     
    Give Opera a try.

    • #7
    • April 3, 2014 at 2:05 pm
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  8. Member

    This might be my favorite part of the blog:

    No responses yet
    Comments are closed, but trackbacks are open.

    • #8
    • April 3, 2014 at 2:12 pm
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  9. Member

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.:

    Our organizational culture reflects diversity and inclusiveness. We welcome contributions from everyone regardless of age, culture, ethnicity, gender, gender-identity, language, race, sexual orientation, geographical location and religious views.

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha. No you don’t.

    This is how I can tell I’m getting old: I can actually remember a time when liberals thought that hounding someone from public life for having a controversial opinion was a bad thing. Can you imagine?

    I support gay marriage. I think Prop 8 was stupid, and would have voted against it had I lived in California. I still find it kind of amazing that anyone who holds the same opinion as well-known dashboard saint Barack Obama back in 2008 is now considered an unconscionable bigot.

    All the people cheering this news better pray that none of their opinions ever become unfashionable.

    • #9
    • April 3, 2014 at 2:49 pm
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  10. Member

    Roberto:

    Bryan G. Stephens: Man, Going to have to switch browsers. But I hate Google too.

    Give Opera a try.

     Is there any advantage for keeping Firefox?

    I might consider switching just to send the message that this is reprehensible. But I doubt the Opera crew is any better. Note the environmental policy at the bottom of their vision page.

    Web browsers might not be the ideal industry for it, but conservatives do need to support conservative-owned companies if only to counteract liberal boycotts and defamation. It would be nice if we could just focus on products and services, but liberals will successfully suppress conservative businesses if we do.

    • #10
    • April 3, 2014 at 2:50 pm
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  11. Member

    PsychLynne made a very important point in the Member Feed:

    It’s certainly a way to dry up donations, without having to worry about campaign finance laws at all.

    More than laws determine the limits of our freedoms.

    • #11
    • April 3, 2014 at 2:57 pm
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  12. Inactive

    Everyone in the academy and many other fields live in fear of this sort of thing. And oh my goodness–the irony of that statement from the company is breathtaking. Of course, they know no one on the left will call them on it. The upside is that they are setting themselves up for a future like the never-ending and losing (for the left) one over abortion. These kinds of witch hunts don’t last forever, and when they crash, a lot comes down with them. Those of us who live in CA are not in the least surprised. That was exactly the atmosphere at the time, Obama’s stated position notwithstanding. Count the Smith family as proud donors to Prop 8 who were “exposed” on 8 maps.

    • #12
    • April 3, 2014 at 3:02 pm
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  13. Inactive

    Aaron Miller:

    Roberto:

    Bryan G. Stephens: Man, Going to have to switch browsers. But I hate Google too.

    Give Opera a try.

    Is there any advantage for keeping Firefox?

    Using a browser that has a smaller market share increases the odds that web pages will not display correctly as developers are less likely to spend time testing a site with niche browsers, Firefox is one of the big three so there is that. Also there is a large selection of add-ons for Firefox that many find useful which will no longer be available if you choose to use an alternate browser.

    • #13
    • April 3, 2014 at 3:35 pm
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  14. Contributor

    Wylee Coyote:

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.:

    Our organizational culture reflects diversity and inclusiveness. We welcome contributions from everyone regardless of age, culture, ethnicity, gender, gender-identity, language, race, sexual orientation, geographical location and religious views.

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha. No you don’t.
    ….

    Translation: if you’re Muslim, we won’t run you out of the company for opposing SSM. 

    • #14
    • April 3, 2014 at 3:41 pm
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  15. Member

    It’s really kinda scary. What happened to “tolerance”? Mozilla clearly doesn’t believe in openness or inclusiveness or equality for all. I don’t see why they posted that nonsense. They should’ve just said “hey, this situation could’ve become financially disastrous so we cut the guy loose. In the end, we are driven by profits.”

    • #15
    • April 3, 2014 at 4:19 pm
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  16. Member

    Roberto: Is there any advantage for keeping Firefox? Using a browser that has a smaller market share increases the odds that web pages will not display correctly as developers are less likely to spend time testing a site with niche browsers, Firefox is one of the big three so there is that. Also there is a large selection of add-ons for Firefox that many find useful which will no longer be available if you choose to use an alternate browser.

    I decided to give Opera a try, so far Ricochet seems to work as well as 2.0 does in any other browser. And Opera does have add-ons too, though probably not as many.

    Chrome is also a viable alternative, with an extensive selection of add-ons. I get that some people don’t trust Google, though.

    • #16
    • April 3, 2014 at 4:55 pm
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  17. Inactive

    Goodbye, Firefox.

    Hello again, Safari.

    • #17
    • April 3, 2014 at 5:03 pm
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  18. Member

    “Our organizational culture reflects diversity and inclusiveness. We welcome contributions from everyone regardless of age, culture, ethnicity, gender, gender-identity, language, race, sexual orientation, geographical location and religious views. Mozilla supports equality for all.”- Blahblahblah.

    Mitchell Baker could have saved her time writing the company’s rationale for forcing Eich out by just summing it up with this Office clip:

    • #18
    • April 3, 2014 at 5:19 pm
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  19. Member

    On Chrome I’ve used a plug-in called FlashBlock that prevents Flash from running automatically when a page loads. It makes it easy to view the Flash videos you actually want to see, while preventing annoying Flash ads that start running (and playing audio) w/o your permission.

    I just discovered Opera comes with this feature built-in: go to Settings->Web Sites, then under Plug-ins change the setting to Click to play.

    • #19
    • April 3, 2014 at 5:33 pm
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  20. Member

    Aaron Miller: I might consider switching just to send the message that this is reprehensible. But I doubt the Opera crew is any better. Note the environmental policy at the bottom of their vision page.

    I don’t object to a company having an environmental policy. There’s value to clean air, clean water, recycling, and so forth, especially when done voluntarily rather than as part of some over-broad top-down mandate. 

    More importantly, unlike the other side, I don’t insist that companies I patronize agree with me on every issue in the first place. I just think Mozilla crossed a line here by firing someone for their personal religious & political views.

    • #20
    • April 3, 2014 at 5:56 pm
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  21. Member

    But I doubt the Opera crew is any better. Note the environmental policy at the bottom of their vision page.

    I don’t care what their stated politics are. It’s that they bowed to the screamers. I’d fully uninstall FF but I create web content and have to evaluate the formatting, etc.

    • #21
    • April 3, 2014 at 7:28 pm
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  22. Member

    I suspect they all want my head on a pike, so I see no reason to rotate browsers based on who last offended me.

    Justice Breyer wants restrict speech because it might result in political pressure he doesn’t like. The IRS leaks donors of unfavored causes, which may not have led directly to this, but certainly contributed. Now this. Rob Long joked that Ricochet was the resistance. I’m no longer convinced its a joke.

    Anyone know how to create a black-market communications network a la the fax machines the Chinese Student movement used? Because we may need one in the next decade.

    • #22
    • April 3, 2014 at 7:32 pm
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  23. Member

    All the people cheering this news better pray that none of their opinions ever become unfashionable.

    I tried to make this point with a few Twitterlocutors but to no avail. They were sure that their antipathy to bigotry was a hill worth dying on, and that if society decided to persecute them for that, they’d be honored.

    I even pointed out that they might get targeted for something that’s non-controversial today, and it made no impact. They’re on the right side of history and that’s all there is to that.

    • #23
    • April 3, 2014 at 7:35 pm
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  24. Member

    Goldgeller:
    It’s really kinda scary. What happened to “tolerance”?

     “Tolerance” was a weapon used by the counterculture revolution to say, “We’re going to do what we want and you squares are going to shut up about it.”

    Until they got into power and could use more than fake slogans to defeat their enemies.

    • #24
    • April 3, 2014 at 7:39 pm
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  25. Member

    Joseph Stanko: I don’t object to a company having an environmental policy.[…] especially when done voluntarily

    I don’t object either. But inclusion of said policy on a company website is a pretty sure sign of liberal loons, even if conservatives could get on board.

    Besides, Opera is a software company, not a chemical supplier. Odds are, they wouldn’t even use paper if not for the accountants.

    Joseph Stanko: More importantly, unlike the other side, I don’t insist that companies I patronize agree with me on every issue in the first place. I just think Mozilla crossed a line here by firing someone for their personal religious & political views.

    At risk of declaring someone guilty by association, do you know many liberals who object to such rampant demonization and political bullying?

    Have any Firefox competitors spoken out against this despicable act? Doing so probably wouldn’t undermine profits because they would gain users like us as they lost jackbooted consumers. But even if speaking out did require a financial hit, are we really going to sell our freedoms so cheaply?

    I’ll give liberals this: they, at least, acknowledge that business is more than money.

    • #25
    • April 3, 2014 at 7:45 pm
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  26. Member

    dicentra: ”Tolerance” was a weapon used by the counterculture revolution to say, “We’re going to do what we want and you squares are going to shut up about it.”

    They’re tolerant of everything except intolerance. Seriously, that’s a common argument I hear. Conveniently enough, they get to decide what counts as “tolerant” and “intolerant.”

    • #26
    • April 3, 2014 at 8:14 pm
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  27. Member

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    Man, Going to have to switch browsers. But I hate Google too.
    Everyone is a coward in the face to thugs it seems these days.
    I wonder if you could do a comic in which Lex Luthor is an arch villian, not because he has any real crimes, but because he is a John Galt like figure that make money and believes in Truth, Justice and the American way (unlike the Gay Mafia).

     
    That plot is used all the time. I suspect you want to see it used ironically.

    On a related note, Stan Lee took mentioned that he enjoyed getting people to like Tony Stark (Iron Man), a rich CEO they would normally love to hate.

    • #27
    • April 3, 2014 at 8:21 pm
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  28. Inactive

    For me, it is the fact that they collapsed in the face of a lynch mob over someone’s private expression of a political opinion; and because it’s an opinion I happen to agree with, I won’t be using Firefox any more. Compound it with the perfectly hypocritical explanation of their “tolerant” corporate culture. Right. Being a supporter of marriage in California these days feels a bit like what it must have been like to be a Jew in Germany in the 30s.

    BTW, you can leave a comment for them about whether Firefox made you “happy” or “sad” today. I let them know why Firefox made me sad and why I won’t be using it anymore.

    • #28
    • April 3, 2014 at 9:26 pm
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  29. Contributor

    I wonder if the Duck Dynasty guys have any job openings….

    • #29
    • April 3, 2014 at 9:35 pm
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  30. Member

    Totus Porcus: BTW, you can leave a comment for them about whether Firefox made you “happy” or “sad” today. I let them know why Firefox made me sad and why I won’t be using it anymore.

     Where? Can you add a link?

    • #30
    • April 3, 2014 at 9:54 pm
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