It’s Election Day in the UK!

 

Does it matter?

I dunno any more.  Ever since (and  perhaps even before) I read the headline a day or so ago that Rishi Sunak (that’s Rasheed Sunook, to you Biden acolytes) said that the Tory party has “24 hours to save Britain.

I’m fairly rational.  The one or two (or three or four) of you on this site who think I’m an emotional whack job, do your worst.  You know who you are. And I’m ready.

And yet.

When it comes right down to it, I can’t help noticing that the “Tory” party has been in power in the UK since May 2010.  All the way through David Cameron, Theresa May, Boris Johnson, Liz Truss, and Rishi Sunak.

That’s roughly (in my emotional whack job terms) about 125,000 hours.

Really, Rishi?  You’re pandering for votes over your ability to “fix” things in the next twenty-four?

What the fpft hell has your party been doing for the past one-hundred-twenty-five thousand?

And.  Whatever.  Please stop blaming everything on Liz Truss who was–let’s face it–Prime Minister for what? 44 days?  Maybe 1000 of those hours.

What about the other 124, 000? Who was in charge for them?

Not Liz Truss, that’s for sure.

Honestly.  I can’t even.

Eight years ago I went to bed at some ungodly hour sure that the Brexiteers must have lost.  Shortly thereafter, I woke up to find that that was–gloriously–not the case.

Five months later, I stayed awake (more favorable time zone) to watch the lamentations of the United States mainstream media as Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton for the presidency.  That might have been even more glorious.

I don’t expect history to repeat itself in the one case.  As for the other, the jury’s still out.

What say you?

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  1. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    There’s a minor pseudo-“scandal” that PM Sunak owns a condo in Santa Monica. If, as expected, he loses, I will at least buy him a drink at The King’s Head. 

    • #1
  2. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Gonna be a rough 5 years with the commies in charge.

    • #2
  3. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    The question I’ve been itching to as PM Sunak since about a month after he took over:

    • #3
  4. EJHill Staff
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    It struck me that while Europe is turning right, the UK is turning left. But are they?

    Are the voters embracing Labour or are they just pushing the exhausted Tories to the side? Boris Johnson came in and captured an 83 seat majority in the House and squandered it all away. What a waste.

    • #4
  5. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    EJHill (View Comment):

    It struck me that while Europe is turning right, the UK is turning left. But are they?

    Are the voters embracing Labour or are they just pushing the exhausted Tories to the side? Boris Johnson came in and captured an 83 seat majority in the House and squandered it all away. What a waste.

    Good question. I believe that Bill Clinton won in 1992 because voters were bored with 12 years of GOP power. That’s not as crazy as it sounds; most administrations run out of gas by some point. 

    • #5
  6. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    There’s a minor pseudo-“scandal” that PM Sunak owns a condo in Santa Monica. If, as expected, he loses, I will at least buy him a drink at The King’s Head.

    The Henry Olsen podcast on the Brit election said that Rishi is going to move to California and be (again) part of the high tech elite.

    • #6
  7. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    EJHill (View Comment):

    It struck me that while Europe is turning right, the UK is turning left. But are they?

    Are the voters embracing Labour or are they just pushing the exhausted Tories to the side? Boris Johnson came in and captured an 83 seat majority in the House and squandered it all away. What a waste.

    Exactly. I would be tempted to vote Labour ( did I get the spelling right, She?) just because 14 years is a long time to be in power. I’m hoping Sir Keir won’t to too much damage but am worried about the Constitutional reforms Labour wants to push through. How you change a Constitution when you don’t have a written Constitution is one thing about Britain I haven’t figured out – along with cricket.

    • #7
  8. EJHill Staff
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    colleenb: How you change a Constitution when you don’t have a written Constitution is one thing about Britain I haven’t figured out – along with cricket.

    They consider the collective output of Parliament as the “English Constitution.”

    • #8
  9. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    EJHill (View Comment):

    colleenb: How you change a Constitution when you don’t have a written Constitution is one thing about Britain I haven’t figured out – along with cricket.

    They consider the collective output of Parliament as the “English Constitution.”

    But is that really a Constitution? I guess so but I guess this American just can’t wrap her head around it. By the way, why does a Labour person accept an admittedly honorific title? Shouldn’t a real Labour person eschew that upper class title thing?

    • #9
  10. She Member
    She
    @She

    colleenb (View Comment):
    By the way, why does a Labour person accept an admittedly honorific title? Shouldn’t a real Labour person eschew that upper class title thing?

    Bravo.  I’ve spent a couple of weeks asking pretty much the same thing on a few British news websites.  Mostly, the “dislikes” have outweighed the “likes.”

    Starmer has really made a meal of his humble beginnings.  (They may not have been so humble.)  Still and all, he’s recently had much press coverage for saying that he wouldn’t “go private” and around the NHS, even for the sake of his own children who might be dying.

    Most Brits, the polls say, find this attitude inexplicable.  Most Brits would move heaven and earth, and go around whatever they needed to, to get life-saving treatment for their loved ones.

    Still, I guess “Sir Keir” is poised to become the next PM.

    TBC, the peerage/title was awarded to him ten years ago, by the monarch, for “services to law and criminal justice.”

    And yes.  I believe a man who has the moral principles he pretends to, and who doesn’t otherwise think his wife should be referred to for the rest of her life as though her first name is “Lady,” should have refused the bloody thing.

    • #10
  11. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    She (View Comment):
    Most Brits, the polls say, find this attitude inexplicable.  Most Brits would move heaven and earth, and go around whatever they needed to, to get life-saving treatment for their loved ones.

    If his own children don’t rate any more than that, what can the average British taxpayer expect?

    I’d bounce him to the curb on general principles.

    • #11
  12. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    Percival (View Comment):

    She (View Comment):
    Most Brits, the polls say, find this attitude inexplicable. Most Brits would move heaven and earth, and go around whatever they needed to, to get life-saving treatment for their loved ones.

    If his own children don’t rate any more than that, what can the average British taxpayer expect?

    I’d bounce him to the curb on general principles.

    It’s so interesting that you can’t see the principled reason behind a view other than your own.

    You don’t have to agree with the other view.  You should be able to understand it.  It’s not complicated.

    • #12
  13. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    She (View Comment):
    Most Brits, the polls say, find this attitude inexplicable. Most Brits would move heaven and earth, and go around whatever they needed to, to get life-saving treatment for their loved ones.

    If his own children don’t rate any more than that, what can the average British taxpayer expect?

    I’d bounce him to the curb on general principles.

    It’s so interesting that you can’t see the principled reason behind a view other than your own.

    You don’t have to agree with the other view. You should be able to understand it. It’s not complicated.

    I guess that I should defer to your superior intellect, yes?

    how about this: the Russian gas was cheap and there was no chance that a dime store weasel-faced KGB gunsel would throw Europe into chaos and cut them off so that they’d knuckle under. That’s what the Germans thought.

    • #13
  14. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot) Member
    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patriot)
    @ArizonaPatriot

    Percival (View Comment):

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    She (View Comment):
    Most Brits, the polls say, find this attitude inexplicable. Most Brits would move heaven and earth, and go around whatever they needed to, to get life-saving treatment for their loved ones.

    If his own children don’t rate any more than that, what can the average British taxpayer expect?

    I’d bounce him to the curb on general principles.

    It’s so interesting that you can’t see the principled reason behind a view other than your own.

    You don’t have to agree with the other view. You should be able to understand it. It’s not complicated.

    I guess that I should defer to your superior intellect, yes?

    how about this: the Russian gas was cheap and there was no chance that a dime store weasel-faced KGB gunsel would throw Europe into chaos and cut them off so that they’d knuckle under. That’s what the Germans thought.

    Easier to be snarky than to try thinking, isn’t it?

    I wasn’t claiming a superior intellect.  I was saying that you should be able to understand it.  I was actually expressing confidence in your intellect.

    But hey, since you didn’t rise to the occasion, I’ll make the point.  It doesn’t take a dizzying intellect.  A middle-schooler could understand it.

    I don’t know whether or not this expresses Starmer’s personal explanation.  I can imagine, though, that he believes that the National Health Service should provide good medical care to everyone in Britain.  I can imagine, too, that in implementing that goal, he doesn’t expect any special treatment for himself, or for his kids.

    That’s a principled position.  No special treatment for his own kids.

    It’s your position that actually looks unprincipled, as you seem to expect special treatment for your kids.  It’s understandable to want that.  But principled?  On a day when we’re supposedly celebrating an assertion that “all men are created equal”?

    Your principle appears to be selfishness.  Self-righteously selfish.

    • #14
  15. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    colleenb (View Comment):

    EJHill (View Comment):

    It struck me that while Europe is turning right, the UK is turning left. But are they?

    Are the voters embracing Labour or are they just pushing the exhausted Tories to the side? Boris Johnson came in and captured an 83 seat majority in the House and squandered it all away. What a waste.

    Exactly. I would be tempted to vote Labour ( did I get the spelling right, She?) just because 14 years is a long time to be in power. I’m hoping Sir Keir won’t to too much damage but am worried about the Constitutional reforms Labour wants to push through. How you change a Constitution when you don’t have a written Constitution is one thing about Britain I haven’t figured out – along with cricket.

    I’d be more tempted to vote for Nigel Farage’s Reform UK.

    • #15
  16. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    colleenb (View Comment):

    EJHill (View Comment):

    It struck me that while Europe is turning right, the UK is turning left. But are they?

    Are the voters embracing Labour or are they just pushing the exhausted Tories to the side? Boris Johnson came in and captured an 83 seat majority in the House and squandered it all away. What a waste.

    Exactly. I would be tempted to vote Labour ( did I get the spelling right, She?) just because 14 years is a long time to be in power. I’m hoping Sir Keir won’t to too much damage but am worried about the Constitutional reforms Labour wants to push through. How you change a Constitution when you don’t have a written Constitution is one thing about Britain I haven’t figured out – along with cricket.

    I’d be more tempted to vote for Nigel Farage’s Reform UK.

    True. Reform UK not available in every place but assume you can write in.

    • #16
  17. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt
    @BrianWatt

    If you’ve listened to Matt Goodwin in the past year, you know precisely why the conservatives got their drubbing tonight. The Tories essentially never challenged woke ideology, oversaw the expansion of both legal and illegal immigration under Boris Johnson and Sunak and did nothing, and enthusiastically embraced climate alarmism, NetZero, and wind technology as something that would somehow save Britain from extinction. When your party is led by condescending Oxbridge elites who’ve lost touch with the Britons who voted for Brexit and embraced many of Labour’s ideological positions, then you shouldn’t be surprised that long-time conservative voters became angry and either didn’t vote at all or voted for Farage’s Reform Party.

    • #17
  18. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    Brian Watt (View Comment):

    If you’ve listened to Matt Goodwin in the past year, you know precisely why the conservatives got their drubbing tonight. The Tories essentially never challenged woke ideology, oversaw the expansion of both legal and illegal immigration under Boris Johnson and Sunak and did nothing, and enthusiastically embraced climate alarmism, NetZero, and wind technology as something that would somehow save Britain from extinction. When your party is led by condescending Oxbridge elites who’ve lost touch with the Britons who voted for Brexit and embraced many of Labour’s ideological positions, then you shouldn’t be surprised that long-time conservative voters became angry and either didn’t vote at all or voted for Farage’s Reform Party.

    Not to mention they implemented a Covid lockdown regime more draconian than ours, then hypocritically ignored their own rules. 

    • #18
  19. Charles Mark Member
    Charles Mark
    @CharlesMark

    Many leftists who droned on about Trump (or any other GOP President) not winning “the popular vote” are ecstatic to see Labour win a massive majority, with around 36% of the UK’s equally irrelevant popular vote. This is how the UK’s first-past-the-post system works.

    As an aside, the demise of the far-left, woke on steroids, Israel-hating, Scottish National Party is most welcome.

    • #19
  20. GlennAmurgis Coolidge
    GlennAmurgis
    @GlennAmurgis

    The Tories did this to themselves. 

    Cameron is a “David Frum” conservative who cares more about Klauss Scwhab and Davos Crowd than the UK. 

    Lis Truss, Theresa May and Sunak was not up for the job

    Boris did ok on Brexit but not much else. He was a Covid Hypocrite in the manner of Gavin Newsom, he pushed the who “Build back better” and is a crazy greenie. 

    It’s going to take a while for them to build up their bench – I hope they don’t have to go through another version of the 1970s to get their next Maggie. (the UK 70s were even worse than the US)

    • #20
  21. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    Steyn:

    Sir Keir has pulled off what the commentators are calling a “loveless landslide”. He was the beneficiary, in England, of the implosion of the Conservative Party and, north of the border, of the implosion of the Scottish National Party – both entirely deserved. Yet Labour’s share of the vote is five points lower than Jeremy Corbyn’s supposedly humiliating defeat in 2017: in fact, it is the lowest share of the vote for any majority-winning party ever – just thirty-five per cent.

    • #21
  22. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    The Tories deserve to be ended. I hope Reform can replace them – a new right-wing, pro-British party.

    • #22
  23. Michael G. Gallagher Coolidge
    Michael G. Gallagher
    @MichaelGallagher

    To @she, @JosephStanko, @CharlesMark,@GlennAmurgis, @iwe

    It looks like the Brits are going to put themselves through another period of self-induced socialist pain and suffering. They did this between mid-1945 when they voted Churchill out of office until 1979, when they installed Margaret Thatcher in 10 Downing Street. Hopefully, they’ll learn their lessons far more quickly this time around.

    • #23
  24. iWe Coolidge
    iWe
    @iWe

    I follow Nigel Farage. He is doing a press conference now, live on Twitter/X. Fantastic.

    • #24
  25. She Member
    She
    @She

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    I don’t know whether or not this expresses Starmer’s personal explanation. I can imagine, though, that he believes that the National Health Service should provide good medical care to everyone in Britain. I can imagine, too, that in implementing that goal…

    Good luck to him in that regard.  Several sticks of dynamite and a match might be a good start.

    That’s a principled position. No special treatment for his own kids.

    It’s your position that actually looks unprincipled, as you seem to expect special treatment for your kids. It’s understandable to want that. But principled? On a day when we’re supposedly celebrating an assertion that “all men are created equal”?

    I don’t know how “Sir Keir Starmer” feels about that.  He has acknowledged that he uses a private dentist.  (Adults in Britain are eligible for NHS dentistry, but must pay what we in the US would refer to as a “co-pay” in order to cover a portion of the cost.  But Sir Keir is quite happy to go private and pay full freight for his teeth. And very nice, principled, teeth they appear to be.)

    The provision, and use of, private service healthcare is widespread and perfectly legal in Britain. People at all income levels occasionally “go private,” even just in a one-off situation where they can’t get NHS care in a timely manner but a few pounds will–for example–get them an appointment with a GP (family practitioner) at a private clinic, so they can get antibiotics for their child’s lung infection.  There’s little, if any stigma attached to their doing so, hysterical animadversions to the contrary by foreigners notwithstanding.

    • #25
  26. She Member
    She
    @She

    Charles Mark (View Comment):
    As an aside, the demise of the far-left, woke on steroids, Israel-hating, Scottish National Party is most welcome.

    Indeed.  What Nicola Sturgeon started, Humza Yousaf continued, and John Swinney was left holding the bag.

    Strangely, my sister’s constituency (in Scotland) has been told that the result of the vote won’t be announced until tomorrow.  When I asked her what on earth they were doing, her response was “printing more votes?”

    I’m still not sure if she was joking or not.

    • #26
  27. She Member
    She
    @She

    iWe (View Comment):

    I follow Nigel Farage. He is doing a press conference now, live on Twitter/X. Fantastic.

    I listened to that.  He was strenuously heckled at the start.  Considering that all admitted were supposed to have been vetted and be supporters of Reform UK, one wonders how they got in there undetected.

    Also considering that two UK Members of Parliament have actually been assassinated  (to death) by members of the public in the last eight years, and that Rishi Sunak’s house has been regularly targeted by both climate and anti-Israel protestors, some of whom have broken through any protective barriers and have been seen climbing on his rooftop to erect signs supporting their cause, and given that threats of arson and physical harm against British MPs have exploded to an extent not even contemplated against their counterparts in the United States, one would think the Brits would be a little more proactive and ginger about allowing just anyone into such an event.

    May God keep Nigel, and all the rest of them safe.  Because I’m not sure Scotland Yard is doing its bit.

    • #27
  28. She Member
    She
    @She

    One of the oddities of the British party politic is the rather cynical deployment of MP candidates throughout the electoral rolls who do not live in the areas in which they run, but who are “selected” to run there because they’re likely to win there.

    I can’t quite figure out the US analog, because I regularly see the fallout from a person who runs in a congressional district or state who’s found out not to really live in it, and I see the excoriation and accusations of “carpetbagging” with all of the “carpetbaggage” that goes with it, and the regular failure to thrive and get themselves elected because of it.  Dr. Oz, call your office.

    That doesn’t seem to be the case in the UK.  Nigel Farage (to pick a person at random) doesn’t live in Clacton. He was selected to run there by the party, which thought (rightly) that he could win there.  Good on him.  He deserves a win in his eighth try.

    This is a common practice by all the parties, one I was expostulating about with my sister (in Scotland) earlier today.  “Oh, yes,” she said.  “And they’ll take a younger person and try them out in various constituencies all over the country to get them some seasoning, and then–when they think they’re ready–they’ll run them in a bigger constituency where they might win.”

    IMHO, this explains a lot about what’s wrong with the British system.

    At the moment, there’s a fairly strong movement in favor of “proportional representation” by percentage of the national vote.  This would remedy the fact that, while Labor only got 34% of the national vote, it has 63% of the MPs. Or that–while Reform had almost 15% of the vote and achieved only five seats, the LibDems had three-percent fewer in the national vote total (12%) and achieved seventy-one seats.

    I think–were I still living in Britain and voting in Britain, that I could accept such an outcome, if I believed that every one of those MPs lived in his or her constituency  and loved, and truly represented, his or her constituents.

    But in a–for want of a better word–“rigged” system where many of them ran only because that’s where their party had shunted them, for the “win,” I don’t really know if “local politics” is the be-all-and-end-all anymore.

    Why not just post a “national slate” for each party, let the election happen, and then apportion the MPs based on the national vote?

    (I should mention that–living in Scotland–my sister is already subject to something of such a system for the Scottish Parliament.  I can’t recount here what she says about the fallout.)

    • #28
  29. Barfly Member
    Barfly
    @Barfly

    She: the “Tory” party has been in power in the UK since May 2010.

    From over here, it seems the only good thing they did was Brexit. Is that right?

    • #29
  30. She Member
    She
    @She

    Barfly (View Comment):

    She: the “Tory” party has been in power in the UK since May 2010.

    From over here, it seems the only good thing they did was Brexit. Is that right?

    Well, allowing a referendum on Brexit, anyway.  When the votes came in, and he discovered his side had lost, the first thing Tory PM David Cameron did was resign, ushering in (without a popular election) fellow “Remainer” Theresa May.  She swore to uphold the will of the people, but did much to enmesh them further with EU regulation and institutions (and is primarily responsible for the fact that the UK is all-in on “Net Zero.”)  Her failure to actually execute the terms of Brexit led to her resignation in 2019, and the country’s last election, in which Boris Johnson, on the pledge of “Get Brexit Done” was elected with a thumping Conservative majority.  He turned out to be something of a disappointment, but did move Brexit forward, getting Britain out of a number of EU entanglements, but leaving the question of Northern Ireland–and its shared border with still-in-the-EU southern Republic,in particular–as an undealt-with hairball.  He then got himself all tied up in “Cakegate” because he’d he’d had a party at No 10 among people who were already there working together to celebrate his birthday and had eaten a piece of cake and drunk a glass of wine.  This was viewed by his opponents within his own party as a horrible betrayal of Covid lockdown principles, and eventually–amidst the accompanying media hysteria–brought down the government.  Next up, the new leader of the Party, Liz Truss (who’d not really been involved in the plot to overthrow Boris), for her forty-nine days as Prime Minister before she was dethroned by “Fishy Rishi” and the same sort of internal cabal who brought down BoJo, in her case because they didn’t like the fact that she’d announced an intention to govern as an actual Conservative.  And since Rishi Sunak had been the second-place finisher when Truss won the Party member vote to elect her  (again, not a popular election), Sunak was crowned the next Prime Minister in October of 2022.

    None of this deals with the other ongoing sore spot, the Conservative’s inability to “stop the boats” of illegal immigrants crossing the border from France.  But that’s another story.

    So here we are.

    Brexit still isn’t actually done, and there’s a strong possibility, if Starmer remains in No. 10 for any length of time, that key EU relationships, if not an actual rejoining with Europe will happen at some time.

    So I guess the short answer to your question is “Not even that, really, because they never closed the deal.”

    • #30
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