My Experience with a Tesla

 

I have been a car junkie for my entire life. As a child, I sat in our family’s MG roadster and cried as someone who was buying it was on the way to our house to pick it up.  Virtually every car I owned was a stick shift, and as my years progressed, my cars got better. I have owned BMW 740 series, Mercedes AMG sedans, and two Golf GTIs.  My cars generally don’t last to 3 years of ownership.  6 years ago, I bought a Tesla Model S.  I did not buy it to save the planet, I bought it because I got to drive a friend’s Model S for a day. 

They are a blast to drive, as an electric motor can deliver maximum torque as soon as it starts spinning. No shifting of gears to get up to maximum torque, no shifting ever.  With regenerative braking, you don’t need to downshift as you enter corners.  Lift your foot off the accelerator and mountain and curving roads become fun.  Our house already had Solar panels, so I have never had to pay for gas, as 99% of my charging is done at home. When I purchased the car it came with free supercharging for the duration of my ownership.

We had one long road trip from San Diego to Portland. My wife and I planned our departures on the 2-day trip up and back to leave early, drive roughly 150 miles, and stop for breakfast as the car recharged. We had a coffee stop, lunch, a walking break, dinner, and then a Hotel with superchargers.  We figured the charging breaks on the first day cost us about 45 mins extra time on a 750-mile day.  It was actually a little more enjoyable as we got to stretch our legs a little more. 

Now the fun part: after roughly 50,000 miles —I have a short commute — and my total expenditure has been a set of tires!  I have no trips to the dealer, no oil changes, no 5,000-mile checkups for maintenance, nothing.  I figure that is at least two times a year I would have had to drop off at the dealer and be picked up, or otherwise be provided with a loner.  I have several friends with the same experience of NO maintenance cost.  (A friend of mine’s wife had a 60-mile one-way commute and her brakes needed replacing at 320,000 miles.  I had a BMW that needed new brakes at 18,000 miles for 900 dollars, and that was 25 years ago and not covered under warranty!)

I know the charging issue is an issue for some people, but for most, the cars make so much sense.  Never go to a gas station, no service appointments, a blast to drive, and California weather makes the cold battery problem a nonissue.  My brothers are amazed that I have kept the same car for 6 years, and I have no thoughts of a new car unless I win the lottery — which isn’t likely because I don’t play.  If I did, I would get a Model S Plaid!

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  1. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Glad my tax dollars helped pay for you to have a car i can’t afford. 

    • #1
  2. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    From the point of view of a car lover, the electrics are terrific. The center of balance is lower for better handling. Smooth-as-silk neck-snapping torque when you want it, minimal maintenance costs. 

    My Chevrolet Volt, which was made 2011-19, is IMHO being recognized as one way to do a much more practical transition. It’s a “strong” (that is, series) hybrid. It’s always propelled electrically, unlike Prius-type parallel hybrids that switch back and forth, but the Volt has a small engine that runs a generator if needed, so it gets by with a much smaller battery (it weighs 440 pounds). It has an 8 gallon gas tank. We try to use it all up in a year. Don’t want it to go bad in the lines. 

     

     

    • #2
  3. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    From the point of view of a car lover, the electrics are terrific. The center of balance is lower for better handling. Smooth-as-silk neck-snapping torque when you want it, minimal maintenance costs.

    That can be true, but if something DOES need repair/replacement, the parts can be very expensive, and difficult/slow to get.  Hertz, for example, is pulling back on EV rentals for that reason, among others.

    And after 6 years, Kipputt is approaching the time of battery replacement.  Then he’s going to get some sticker shock.

    • #3
  4. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    From the point of view of a car lover, the electrics are terrific. The center of balance is lower for better handling. Smooth-as-silk neck-snapping torque when you want it, minimal maintenance costs.

    That can be true, but if something DOES need repair/replacement, the parts can be very expensive, and difficult/slow to get. Hertz, for example, is pulling back on EV rentals for that reason, among others.

    A good part of that is inevitable no matter how cars change over the years. It used to be that a mid-range General Motors V-6 could be serviced in any of thousands of US dealerships, because the basic design hadn’t changed much since the early Eighties. Try going into a dealership and getting parts for a mid-engine 2024 Corvette.

    When I was a kid (apparently, you too) the local yellow pages were full of TV repairmen. I don’t think I’ve actually repaired a TV in 30 years.

    The car repair place a few blocks from here was great–friendly, reasonably priced, a good place to read old magazines while Judge Judy and Hot Bench played in the background. Their families and mine all knew each other. And why not? Every year, rain or shine, we’d spend a couple of grand keeping the family fleet on the road.

    They moved a couple of years ago. In a way, it makes things easier; I don’t have to do more than send a Christmas card anymore.

    • #4
  5. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Gary McVey (View Comment):
    When I was a kid (apparently, you too) the local yellow pages were full of TV repairmen. I don’t think I’ve actually repaired a TV in 30 years.

    I have, even far more recently, but it makes no sense to pay someone else to do it.

    • #5
  6. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Gary McVey (View Comment):
    When I was a kid (apparently, you too) the local yellow pages were full of TV repairmen. I don’t think I’ve actually repaired a TV in 30 years.

    I have, even far more recently, but it makes no sense to pay someone else to do it.

    My grown kids can’t believe that old Dad carried these bulky monsters to the shop, and more often, popped open the back of the cabinet to pull the tubes for testing and replacement. I enjoy the slightly unearned aura of expertise, but back in our day it was not much less common than bringing empty milk bottles back to the store. Color TVs had a lot of tubes and I got to know the “frequent flyers” that went bad quickly. The drug store tube tester was also a cabinet of common replacement tubes. 

    • #6
  7. Headedwest Coolidge
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    How advantageous would it be if you had to pay for charging?

    • #7
  8. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Gary McVey (View Comment):
    When I was a kid (apparently, you too) the local yellow pages were full of TV repairmen. I don’t think I’ve actually repaired a TV in 30 years.

    I have, even far more recently, but it makes no sense to pay someone else to do it.

    My grown kids can’t believe that old Dad carried these bulky monsters to the shop, and more often, popped open the back of the cabinet to pull the tubes for testing and replacement. I enjoy the slightly unearned aura of expertise, but back in our day it was not much less common than bringing empty milk bottles back to the store. Color TVs had a lot of tubes and I got to know the “frequent flyers” that went bad quickly. The drug store tube tester was also a cabinet of common replacement tubes.

    In my case it was an LCD TV, the part was cheap but if I’d had to pay someone else to do it, it would be cheaper to buy another new one.

    • #8
  9. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    How advantageous would it be if you had to pay for charging?

    Especially if the charging cost included road taxes paid by everyone else?

    • #9
  10. The Scarecrow Thatcher
    The Scarecrow
    @TheScarecrow

    Your story (which sounds great, btw) points out the real crux of the argument about these cars: for some people, in some situations, who have certain needs and not others, who have their particular priorities in a travel machine, a battery-powered car might be just the thing. For others, a retiree in a gated community, say, maybe a golf cart might do it. A masonry contractor might require a big dually one-ton pickup. Some people get along quite nicely on a bicycle.

    So where is the wisdom and justification (and right, in a free society) to mandate by law that everybody must use the same car that works so well for, say, you in your situation? Why can’t they leave us the hell alone and mind their own business?

    • #10
  11. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):
    So where is the wisdom and justification (and right, in a free society) to mandate by law that everybody must use the same car that works so well for, say, you in your situation? Why can’t they leave us the hell alone and mind their own business

    The more they are mandatory the more I am against them.

    Owning one is practically giving in.

    And I resent people not paying full price. “OH I love my electric car that was subsidized by taxpayers and driving it on roads I am not paying for!”

     

    • #11
  12. Kevin Schulte Member
    Kevin Schulte
    @KevinSchulte

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):
    So where is the wisdom and justification (and right, in a free society) to mandate by law that everybody must use the same car that works so well for, say, you in your situation? Why can’t they leave us the hell alone and mind their own business

    The more they are mandatory the more I am against them.

    Owning one is practically giving in.

    And I resent people not paying full price. “OH I love my electric car that was subsidized by taxpayers and driving it on roads I am not paying for!”

    If the Prog’s get there way and force everyone into one of these . Expect your electric tax to zoom to pay for the evaporation of gas taxes .  And, as Progs always do . On the transition to electric tax , the tax will be raised on the occasion of the transfer . ” Never let a crisis go to waist ” .

    Eventually , Kipputt will help pay for the pot holed roads with the rest of us . In Spades !

    • #12
  13. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Gary McVey (View Comment):
    When I was a kid (apparently, you too) the local yellow pages were full of TV repairmen. I don’t think I’ve actually repaired a TV in 30 years.

    Remember the vacuum tube testers many stores had?

    • #13
  14. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    kedavis (View Comment):
    And after 6 years, Kipputt is approaching the time of battery replacement.  Then he’s going to get some sticker shock.

    I keep hearing about the horrors of battery replacement.

    I’ve never known anybody who owned an electric car who’s had to replace the battery.

     

    • #14
  15. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    kedavis (View Comment):
    That can be true, but if something DOES need repair/replacement, the parts can be very expensive, and difficult/slow to get.  Hertz, for example, is pulling back on EV rentals for that reason, among others.

    From what I’ve read, the repair/replacement that Hertz is concerned about is from accident/crash damage, not “normal” maintenance.

    And that’s getting more expensive for all cars, not just electrics.

    It used to be if you ripped the side mirror off your car, you went to the auto shop, spent $20 for a new one and bolted it in place.

    Now the mirror has embedded sensors and electronic in it and needs to  be be calibrated after installation at a cost of a few hundred bucks.

    • #15
  16. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    If electric cars were so great there would not need to be subsidies to get people to buy them.

     Electric cars are the fancy toys of the upper middle class and the rich.

     Those of us in the real world can’t afford them even with subsidies.

    • #16
  17. The Scarecrow Thatcher
    The Scarecrow
    @TheScarecrow

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    If electric cars were so great there would not need to be subsidies to get people to buy them.

    Electric cars are the fancy toys of the upper middle class and the rich.

    Those of us in the real world can’t afford them even with subsidies.

    Yes, they are ingenious and wonderful in certain conditions and situations. Like the tram ride that gets you around Disneyland. Or a subway system. Or an escalator. Or a golf cart. Or a moving belt in an airport. But does that mean we have to replace everything with any one of these? 

    I suppose a battery car might work out perfectly for everyone in on of those fifteen minute villages or whatever the WEF is on about. Maybe that is telling us something.

    • #17
  18. The Scarecrow Thatcher
    The Scarecrow
    @TheScarecrow

    The internal combustion engine is a marvelous thing. And it doesn’t have to be as complicated and expensive to work on as it is. My Briggs and Stratton engine on my lawn mower is a piece of cake to maintain and repair. And the engine in my first car, a 66 Buick Special, was fairly straightforward. There were many competing shops in my town who could gladly and easily keep it running for me. When I was in Morocco the mechanics there would even routinely fabricate replacement parts in the back room to keep things running – pretty impressive and resourceful.

    Cars are complicated because the government mandated that they be, all to increase fuel efficiency. But there are no solutions, only trade offs. And the trade off here was to make cars ridiculously complicated and expensive.

    Now they’re pushing battery cars, also complicated and expensive. How is this better?

    • #18
  19. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    If electric cars were so great there would not need to be subsidies to get people to buy them.

    Electric cars are the fancy toys of the upper middle class and the rich.

    Those of us in the real world can’t afford them even with subsidies.

    Yes, they are ingenious and wonderful in certain conditions and situations. Like the tram ride that gets you around Disneyland. Or a subway system. Or an escalator. Or a golf cart. Or a moving belt in an airport. But does that mean we have to replace everything with any one of these?

    I suppose a battery car might work out perfectly for everyone in on of those fifteen minute villages or whatever the WEF is on about. Maybe that is telling us something.

    I like innovative stuff like theme park rides and modern mass transit, but an electric car is not experimental. They’ve been making them for 130 years. I use mine everywhere. That doesn’t mean it’s right for someone else. 

    Riding around town I see lots of big SUVs driven short city distances by women who weigh about 90 pounds, including their Chanel suits. Is that smart? How much money are they tossing out every time they need a gallon of milk or a loaf of bread? 

    Sure, it’s their right. I’m saving a bundle every year. That’s my right, too. 

    • #19
  20. Gary McVey Contributor
    Gary McVey
    @GaryMcVey

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    And after 6 years, Kipputt is approaching the time of battery replacement. Then he’s going to get some sticker shock.

    I keep hearing about the horrors of battery replacement.

    I’ve never known anybody who owned an electric car who’s had to replace the battery.

     

    That’s true, and it was a surprise. When we had a Nissan Leaf (battery only, not a hybrid) I was pissed off at the projected cost of battery replacement. Then I found out that it was a moot point, because as of the cars being in service ten years, nobody had to replace the battery yet. 

     

    • #20
  21. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    If electric cars were so great there would not need to be subsidies to get people to buy them.

    Electric cars are the fancy toys of the upper middle class and the rich.

    Those of us in the real world can’t afford them even with subsidies.

    Yes, they are ingenious and wonderful in certain conditions and situations. Like the tram ride that gets you around Disneyland. Or a subway system. Or an escalator. Or a golf cart. Or a moving belt in an airport. But does that mean we have to replace everything with any one of these?

    I suppose a battery car might work out perfectly for everyone in on of those fifteen minute villages or whatever the WEF is on about. Maybe that is telling us something.

    I like innovative stuff like theme park rides and modern mass transit, but an electric car is not experimental. They’ve been making them for 130 years. I use mine everywhere. That doesn’t mean it’s right for someone else.

    Riding around town I see lots of big SUVs driven short city distances by women who weigh about 90 pounds, including their Chanel suits. Is that smart? How much money are they tossing out every time they need a gallon of milk or a loaf of bread?

    Sure, it’s their right. I’m saving a bundle every year. That’s my right, too.

    It is not your right to be subsidized by everyone else.

     

    • #21
  22. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Kevin Schulte (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):
    So where is the wisdom and justification (and right, in a free society) to mandate by law that everybody must use the same car that works so well for, say, you in your situation? Why can’t they leave us the hell alone and mind their own business

    The more they are mandatory the more I am against them.

    Owning one is practically giving in.

    And I resent people not paying full price. “OH I love my electric car that was subsidized by taxpayers and driving it on roads I am not paying for!”

    If the Prog’s get there way and force everyone into one of these . Expect your electric tax to zoom to pay for the evaporation of gas taxes . And, as Progs always do . On the transition to electric tax , the tax will be raised on the occasion of the transfer . ” Never let a crisis go to waist ” .

    Eventually , Kipputt will help pay for the pot holed roads with the rest of us . In Spades !

    But will be have to pay retroactively for his benefits, in the meantime?

    • #22
  23. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    And after 6 years, Kipputt is approaching the time of battery replacement. Then he’s going to get some sticker shock.

    I keep hearing about the horrors of battery replacement.

    I’ve never known anybody who owned an electric car who’s had to replace the battery.

     

    That’s true, and it was a surprise. When we had a Nissan Leaf (battery only, not a hybrid) I was pissed off at the projected cost of battery replacement. Then I found out that it was a moot point, because as of the cars being in service ten years, nobody had to replace the battery yet.

     

    It’s true that first, the range drops.  So if you got an EV that started out with a 500-mile range but you only drive say 100 miles per day, you can afford to wait longer than someone who drives farther.  (That also seems to be more of an issue with people who use the “superchargers,” which seem to shorten battery life faster.)  It’ll also reduce the resale value a lot more, if that becomes an issue.  Someone looking for a deal on a used EV might not be interested in yours with its reduced range of maybe 200 miles.

    • #23
  24. philo Member
    philo
    @philo

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    And after 6 years, Kipputt is approaching the time of battery replacement. Then he’s going to get some sticker shock.

    I keep hearing about the horrors of battery replacement.

    I’ve never known anybody who owned an electric car who’s had to replace the battery.

     

    That’s true, and it was a surprise. When we had a Nissan Leaf (battery only, not a hybrid) I was pissed off at the projected cost of battery replacement. Then I found out that it was a moot point, because as of the cars being in service ten years, nobody had to replace the battery yet.

     

    It’s true that first, the range drops. So if you got an EV that started out with a 500-mile range but you only drive say 100 miles per day, you can afford to wait longer than someone who drives farther. (That also seems to be more of an issue with people who use the “superchargers,” which seem to shorten battery life faster.) It’ll also reduce the resale value a lot more, if that becomes an issue. Someone looking for a deal on a used EV might not be interested in yours with its reduced range of maybe 200 miles.

    You hint at it with your “resale value” comment but – to more explicitly point out the big turd on the table – the used car market for such vehicles will not work (without additional subsidies, I suppose). Those in the second and third hand market cannot afford to risk it on an iffy battery. They may buy them really cheap but eventually dead EVs will be abandoned in place like fast food wrappers littering urban areas today. What a mess. 

    • #24
  25. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    philo (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Gary McVey (View Comment):

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    And after 6 years, Kipputt is approaching the time of battery replacement. Then he’s going to get some sticker shock.

    I keep hearing about the horrors of battery replacement.

    I’ve never known anybody who owned an electric car who’s had to replace the battery.

     

    That’s true, and it was a surprise. When we had a Nissan Leaf (battery only, not a hybrid) I was pissed off at the projected cost of battery replacement. Then I found out that it was a moot point, because as of the cars being in service ten years, nobody had to replace the battery yet.

     

    It’s true that first, the range drops. So if you got an EV that started out with a 500-mile range but you only drive say 100 miles per day, you can afford to wait longer than someone who drives farther. (That also seems to be more of an issue with people who use the “superchargers,” which seem to shorten battery life faster.) It’ll also reduce the resale value a lot more, if that becomes an issue. Someone looking for a deal on a used EV might not be interested in yours with its reduced range of maybe 200 miles.

    You hint at it with your “resale value” comment but – to more explicitly point out the big turd on the table – the used car market for such vehicles will not work (without additional subsidies, I suppose). Those in the second and third hand market cannot afford to risk it on an iffy battery. They may buy them really cheap but eventually dead EVs will be abandoned in place like fast food wrappers littering urban areas today. What a mess.

    Why would they be “abandoned in place”?  ICE car engines fail.  The cars aren’t left littering the side of the road.

    • #25
  26. Cosmik Phred Member
    Cosmik Phred
    @CosmikPhred

    Here’s my MiL’s Model S experience…

    She was an early adopter and got her $8K or $9K credit – which she didn’t need. She had condos in Del Mar and Tahoe while she lived at a luxury retirement community in the Bay Area. If the authorities were honest they would’ve said “we’re gonna provide subsidies so the wealthy can purchase luxury sports sedans.”

    She accepted the hit on her time to travel between all of her properties. All well and good traveling on the I-5 corridor.  Not as good when going further afield where she’d have to make a detour to find a supercharger.

    I drove it over the hill to Carson City from South Lake Tahoe.  It’s a fantastic vehicle…until it has to be repaired.  On one of my MiL’s trips south she ran over something on I-5 and there was body damage or something or other.  It took months for the repair to happen.  Then she decided to run the Model S into a traffic island on her way to our house at Thanksgiving.  This pretty much dislocated the front driver side wheel/tire from the vehicle. Long story short, due to the age of the car and parts availability, it was totaled.  It has since been salvaged by more enterprising folks and is probably still on the road.  

    She got a decent payout and now drives a RAV4 hybrid and can make good time to visit us and her place in Tahoe. Also, she doesn’t have to stress out over the Tesla running down while parked in our driveway with the charging station 40 minutes away.

    The repair travails are more a statement of about Tesla’s immaturity as a car company and business model than electric vehicles as a whole, but as they say:  your mileage may vary.

    • #26
  27. drlorentz Member
    drlorentz
    @drlorentz

    Aside from the obvious my-taxes-subsidized-your-purchase, there’s also the only slightly less obvious observation that the electric grid is nowhere near able to support a large-scale adoption of electric vehicles. This is exacerbated by the Regime’s push to eliminate natural gas in favor of electricity for cooking and heating.

    In the longer term, it’s absurd to replace cars propelled by a cheap, high-density fuel with batteries* that need to be charged from the grid.† Solar panels are not a practical solution for most of the US population because not every place is California. And those ‘free’ supercharging stations are likely supplied by fossil fuels.

    Should the day ever come when nuclear power is finally accepted as a reasonable replacement for hydrocarbon fuels, electric vehicles will make sense, though further battery improvements are also required to make the lifecycle cost (without subsidies) competitive. For now, it’s simply another transfer-of-wealth scam, just like so many elements of the post-industrial economy.

    *made of materials sourced from hostile foreign countries and mined using slave labor 
    †a grid which is mostly not powered by pixie dust (i.e., wind farms or solar farms) but instead using fossil fuels or the dreaded nukes.

    • #27
  28. ctlaw Coolidge
    ctlaw
    @ctlaw

    Kipputt: Now the fun part: after roughly 50,000 miles —I have a short commute — and my total expenditure has been a set of tires!  I have no trips to the dealer, no oil changes, no 5,000-mile checkups for maintenance, nothing.  I figure that is at least two times a year I would have had to drop off at the dealer and be picked up, or otherwise be provided with a loner. 

    Have you done this basic stuff yourself:

    • Brake fluid health check every 4 years (replace if necessary)*.
    • A/C desiccant bag replacement every 3 years.
    • Cabin air filter replacement every 3 years.
    • HEPA filters replacement every 3 years.
    • Clean and lubricate brake calipers every year or 12,500 miles (20,000 km) if in an area where roads are salted during winter.
    • Rotate tires every 6,250 miles (10,000 km) or if tread depth difference is 2/32 in (1.5 mm) or greater, whichever comes first.

    *Heavy brake usage due to towing, mountain descents, or performance driving — especially for vehicles in hot and humid environments — may necessitate more frequent brake fluid checks and replacements.

    https://www.tesla.com/ownersmanual/models/en_us/GUID-E95DAAD9-646E-4249-9930-B109ED7B1D91.html

     

    There seems to be an interesting bimodal distribution with EVs: mostly much lower than with even a good ICE car like your experience; and nightmare (often due to parts availability).

    • #28
  29. Terence Smith Coolidge
    Terence Smith
    @TerrySmith

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    How advantageous would it be if you had to pay for charging?

    Especially if the charging cost included road taxes paid by everyone else?

    Michigan tacks on a hefty registration fee for EV’s to make up for the lost gas tax revenue. The state at least gets its road money one way or the other. 

    • #29
  30. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    drlorentz (View Comment):

    Aside from the obvious my-taxes-subsidized-your-purchase, there’s also the only slightly less obvious observation that the electric grid is nowhere near able to support a large-scale adoption of electric vehicles. This is exacerbated by the Regime’s push to eliminate natural gas in favor of electricity for cooking and heating.

    In the longer term, it’s absurd to replace cars propelled by a cheap, high-density fuel with batteries* that need to be charged from the grid.† Solar panels are not a practical solution for most of the US population because not every place is California. And those ‘free’ supercharging stations are likely supplied by fossil fuels.

    Should the day ever come when nuclear power is finally accepted as a reasonable replacement for hydrocarbon fuels, electric vehicles will make sense, though further battery improvements are also required to make the lifecycle cost (without subsidies) competitive. For now, it’s simply another transfer-of-wealth scam, just like so many elements of the post-industrial economy.

    *made of materials sourced from hostile foreign countries and mined using slave labor
    †a grid which is mostly not powered by pixie dust (i.e., wind farms or solar farms) but instead using fossil fuels or the dreaded nukes.

    With good nuke power, we could make carbon fuels by carbon extraction from the air. 

     

    • #30
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