Quote of the Day: Delusion

 

A delusion is something that people believe in despite a total lack of evidence. —Richard Dawkins

I’m urging all my millennial peers and the young people coming up behind us to look for signs and symptoms of them being in a Democrat-induced delusion. Don’t confuse the dream state of the socialists with any sort of reality. If you spot any signs of this politically terminal affliction within yourself, please seek help. —Charlie Kirk

There is not to be found, in all history, any miracle attested by a sufficient number of men, of such unquestioned good sense, education and learning, as to secure us against all delusion in themselves. —David Hume

Why are so many people today lured into delusion? If we study the political scene, for one, we hear people who believe that Joe Biden is sometimes subject to stuttering, not that he is in the throes of dementia. That he and Donald Trump are about the same age, so age is irrelevant. That at least Joe Biden is trying to defend democracy, whereas Donald Trump is going to create an authoritarian regime. That Jill Biden will attest to Joe Biden’s hard work and condemn Donald Trump’s lack of character.

The Left continues to support Joe Biden for president in some polls, yet they criticize the lack of an immigration policy. They are suffering from the poor economy and inflation, and yet somehow, they see Joe Biden as separate from these situations. How is that possible?

Part of the explanation is that they are more afraid of Donald Trump than they are of Joe Biden. The media and the Left have done an excellent job of ramping up the propaganda for Biden and against Trump. Despite the damage that Biden has wreaked on this country, they fear that a Trump presidency will be worse. Although Trump showed no evidence of being a dictator in his first term and enacted many policies that benefited the economy, foreign relations, business, and manufacturing, people have been propagandized into fearing him.

My concern is that, even though the public has criticized Biden and his policies in the polls, they will still vote for him on November 5. If you ask them why, they’ll give you a simple answer.

Trump.

Published in Group Writing
This post was promoted to the Main Feed at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

There are 31 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I know that Richard Dawkins believes that there is no G-d, but it’s interesting to see the many different ways that people can use the word, “delusion.”

    • #1
  2. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Richard Dawkins believes inanimate matter reconfigured itself by an unknown process to become self-replicating. He’s never seen that happen. Nobody else has either. He has no evidence of it happening. Clearly he is delusional.

    • #2
  3. namlliT noD Member
    namlliT noD
    @DonTillman

    Susan Quinn: Why are so many people today lured into delusion?

    Because propaganda campaigns can be somewhat effective.  ‘Nothing to do with the actual issues.

     

    • #3
  4. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Arthur Koestler (‘Darkness at Noon’), himself a former Communist, wrote about ideologically closed systems and the difficulty of escaping their gravitational pull.  Link

    • #4
  5. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Also, a post I wrote 9 years ago:  What Are The Fundamental Axioms of ‘Progressivism?  (I used that term because ‘wokeness’ was not yet in general use)  Lots of responses in the comments.

     

     

    • #5
  6. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Well, I have been told repeatedly that supporting Trump is delusional. 

    Unfortunately, we have camps starting from vastly different points. 

    • #6
  7. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    What is delusion? It is an accepted lie. And that lie can originate in others and be transmitted to us, or originate in us and be transmitted to others. Because of this, the lie once accepted has its origins obscured. And we hold fastest to that which we think originated within us. Hubris holds tightly to the lie lest the truth reveal that our thinking is in error, that our minds are not as brilliant as we wish them to be. To challenge a man’s delusions, then, is to challenge the seat of their being. It is not a small things to give up the coveted lie.

    • #7
  8. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Part of the explanation is that they are more afraid of Donald Trump than they are of Joe Biden. The media and the Left have done an excellent job of ramping up the propaganda for Biden and against Trump. In spite of the damage that Biden has wreaked on this country, they fear that a Trump presidency will be worse.

    Susan, I don’t think the Left and the media ( but I repeat myself…) are afraid of Biden at all. Why would they?  He’s on their side. And I doubt they would view what you and I see as damage to this country as damage at all – it’s progress! The Left marches on with its desire to destroy the existing order (order itself, really). 

    I don’t think they even seriously fear a Trump presidency either, or at least not all of them professing to be terrified at the prospect. They just don’t like him. Oh, they would demonize any Republican candidate, but he just seems to drive them off the charts. 

    • #8
  9. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Rodin (View Comment):

    What is delusion? It is an accepted lie. And that lie can originate in others and be transmitted to us, or originate in us and be transmitted to others. Because of this, the lie once accepted has its origins obscured. And we hold fastest to that which we think originated within us. Hubris holds tightly to the lie lest the truth reveal that our thinking is in error, that our minds are not as brilliant as we wish them to be. To challenge a man’s delusions, then, is to challenge the seat of their being. It is not a small things to give up the coveted lie.

    Very well said, Rodin. We do hold tight to our delusions, as if they were a part of us. Thank you.

    • #9
  10. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Also, a post I wrote 9 years ago: What Are The Fundamental Axioms of ‘Progressivism? (I used that term because ‘wokeness’ was not yet in general use) Lots of responses in the comments.

     

     

    Could give a link? Thanks in advance.

    • #10
  11. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Arthur Koestler (‘Darkness at Noon’), himself a former Communist, wrote about ideologically closed systems and the difficulty of escaping their gravitational pull. Link

    Fascinating, David. I especially liked your closing:

    I think there are a lot of people in America today, and in the West generally, who have become accustomed to having ‘the raw material for their deeper emotions’ delivered by the public sphere.

    Second, for some people the desire for affiliation shades into the darker pleasure of behaving with cruelty to those outside the charmed circle…while simultaneously feeling very virtuous about their behavior  See my post Conformity, Cruelty, and Political Activism.

    Third, people who are intelligent, but not at all creative, tend to latch on to the intellectual systems created by others and to hold to those systems create by others even more fiercely than the originators of those systems would do.  This observation is from the writer Andre Maurois, and I think it is correct.  I also think that the description ‘intelligent but not creative’ describes a high percentage of the current incumbents in academia and media organizations.

    • #11
  12. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    Susan, I don’t think the Left and the media ( but I repeat myself…) are afraid of Biden at all.

    Jean, I think they may be concerned about Biden’s mental state and his poor performance, but I guess I think they are more afraid of Trump than you do. It’s hard to believe that the fear is that great, but I believe it is.

    • #12
  13. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Also, a post I wrote 9 years ago: What Are The Fundamental Axioms of ‘Progressivism? (I used that term because ‘wokeness’ was not yet in general use) Lots of responses in the comments.

     

     

    Could give a link? Thanks in advance.

    Sorry, I thought I’d linked it.  Hopefully this will work.

     

     

    • #13
  14. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I know that Richard Dawkins believes that there is no G-d, but it’s interesting to see the many different ways that people can use the word, “delusion.”

    I can picture Dawkins walking through the Pearly Gates.  There, he meets God sitting at a table.  The sign reads:

    “I’m God.  Change my mind.”

    • #14
  15. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Stad (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I know that Richard Dawkins believes that there is no G-d, but it’s interesting to see the many different ways that people can use the word, “delusion.”

    I can picture Dawkins walking through the Pearly Gates. There, he meets God sitting at a table. The sign reads:

    “I’m God. Change my mind.”

    Love it!

    • #15
  16. Mark Camp Member
    Mark Camp
    @MarkCamp

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    David Foster (View Comment):

    Also, a post I wrote 9 years ago: What Are The Fundamental Axioms of ‘Progressivism? (I used that term because ‘wokeness’ was not yet in general use) Lots of responses in the comments.….Hopefully this will work.

    It works, thanks.

    I scanned the Comments looking for an intelligent reply to the question you asked, and was delighted to find one:

    Vader

    So far, I don’t see much in the way of axioms in the comments. I see a lot of comments about flawed reasoning, and a lot of observations about lousy outcomes, all of which seem right but none of which actually get to the axiomatic basis.

    I stopped reading there, not wanting to break the spell.  If I accidentally come back to the present Comment when I am in the right frame of mind, I may read and comment on Vader’s analysis.

    • #16
  17. She Member
    She
    @She

    I don’t know if Richard Dawkins actually understands the relationship between “cause” and “effect.”

    For some time, Dawkins has professed himself to be a “secular Christian.”  As I understand it, he means that he really likes the effects of what used to be called “Western, or Judeo-Christian, Civ,” and he appreciates living in the free and open society that’s grown from it and in which he’s grown up, while–at the same time–he doesn’t buy into the more faith-based strictures of the religion–those which very likely engendered the freedom he applauds–and that he continues to deplore those adherents who are more “religious” in their faith.

    Dawkins frames his position as a “secular Christian” as  one in which he has “the same sense as secular Jews have a feeling for nostalgia and ceremonies.”

    I don’t know enough about Judaism to understand if this is an apt analogy.

    Is it?

    • #17
  18. GlennAmurgis Coolidge
    GlennAmurgis
    @GlennAmurgis

    to quote George Costanza – “It’s not a lie if you believe it”

     

    • #18
  19. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

     

    She (View Comment):

    I don’t know if Richard Dawkins actually understands the relationship between “cause” and “effect.”

    For some time, Dawkins has professed himself to be a “secular Christian.” As I understand it, he means that he really likes the effects of what used to be called “Western, or Judeo-Christian, Civ,” and he appreciates living in the free and open society that’s grown from it and in which he’s grown up, while–at the same time–he doesn’t buy into the more faith-based strictures of the religion–those which very likely engendered the freedom he applauds–and that he continues to deplore those adherents who are more “religious” in their faith.

    Dawkins frames his position as a “secular Christian” as one in which he has “the same sense as secular Jews have a feeling for nostalgia and ceremonies.”

    I don’t know enough about Judaism to understand if this is an apt analogy.

    Is it?

    Maybe Dawkins can help me out by drawing a distinction between “secular Christian” and “cultural parasite.”

    • #19
  20. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Percival (View Comment):

     

    She (View Comment):

    I don’t know if Richard Dawkins actually understands the relationship between “cause” and “effect.”

    For some time, Dawkins has professed himself to be a “secular Christian.” As I understand it, he means that he really likes the effects of what used to be called “Western, or Judeo-Christian, Civ,” and he appreciates living in the free and open society that’s grown from it and in which he’s grown up, while–at the same time–he doesn’t buy into the more faith-based strictures of the religion–those which very likely engendered the freedom he applauds–and that he continues to deplore those adherents who are more “religious” in their faith.

    Dawkins frames his position as a “secular Christian” as one in which he has “the same sense as secular Jews have a feeling for nostalgia and ceremonies.”

    I don’t know enough about Judaism to understand if this is an apt analogy.

    Is it?

    Maybe Dawkins can help me out by drawing a distinction between “secular Christian” and “cultural parasite.”

    Just so.

    • #20
  21. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Percival (View Comment):

    Richard Dawkins believes inanimate matter reconfigured itself by an unknown process to become self-replicating. He’s never seen that happen. Nobody else has either. He has no evidence of it happening. Clearly he is delusional.

    The abiogenesis argument is still a G-d of the gaps argument. Abiogenesis can be interpreted as suggesting the existence of a sentience beyond the random mutations but it is the the slam  dunk case self-congratulatory theists think it is.

    • #21
  22. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Richard Dawkins believes inanimate matter reconfigured itself by an unknown process to become self-replicating. He’s never seen that happen. Nobody else has either. He has no evidence of it happening. Clearly he is delusional.

    The abiogenesis argument is still a G-d of the gaps argument. Abiogenesis can be interpreted as suggesting the existence of a sentience beyond the random mutations but it is the the slam dunk case self-congratulatory theists think it is.

    How does a pile of chemicals mutate?

    • #22
  23. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    She (View Comment):

    I don’t know if Richard Dawkins actually understands the relationship between “cause” and “effect.”

    For some time, Dawkins has professed himself to be a “secular Christian.” As I understand it, he means that he really likes the effects of what used to be called “Western, or Judeo-Christian, Civ,” and he appreciates living in the free and open society that’s grown from it and in which he’s grown up, while–at the same time–he doesn’t buy into the more faith-based strictures of the religion–those which very likely engendered the freedom he applauds–and that he continues to deplore those adherents who are more “religious” in their faith.

    Dawkins frames his position as a “secular Christian” as one in which he has “the same sense as secular Jews have a feeling for nostalgia and ceremonies.”

    I don’t know enough about Judaism to understand if this is an apt analogy.

    Is it?

    I don’t know enough about secular Christianity to make the comparison. ;-)  But the description of the secular Jews sounds about right.

    • #23
  24. Tedley Member
    Tedley
    @Tedley

    Susan Quinn: The Left continues to support Joe Biden for president in some polls, yet they criticize the lack of an immigration policy. They are suffering from the poor economy and inflation, and yet somehow, they see Joe Biden as separate from these situations. How is that possible?

    It’s because they don’t realize that when Americans vote for a president, we are voting for a team of people that the president is going to select to fill Executive Branch appointed positions.  The people who Biden selected to be on his team are mostly pursuing negative policies that are (to list but a few) destructive, corrupt, and anti-democratic.  On the other hand, Trump’s team generally sought to implement positive policies that were the opposite of Biden’s policies.  For those who don’t like Trump, this is a major reason to overlook their distaste and vote for him this year. 

    • #24
  25. Jim Kearney Member
    Jim Kearney
    @JimKearney

    Susan Quinn: The media and the Left have done an excellent job of ramping up the propaganda for Biden and against Trump.

    I’m not so sure they’ve done an excellent job, unless the country has gotten pretty dumb.

    Promulgating illusions, convincing people of the truth of propaganda, can go too far and invite comedic absurdity. 

    Eastern Europeans and Cubans got on to them eventually. It became a whole genre of Russian humor, the only one really. And for the last 65 years Cubans just lined up at the bolsa negrathe black market store, while the official ones became an unofficial joke.

    Most of the liberals I know are smart, well-educated people. Here are three ridiculous delusions currently being circulated by less intelligent, less credible far leftwingers:

    1. Trump has no intention of serving only one term, and is planning a permanent dictatorship;
    2. The January 6 demonstrations in Washington were akin to events at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861;
    3. Questioning the outcome of the 2020 Presidential election in any state means you want to abolish democracy.

    I just don’t believe many voters are dumb enough to believe any of this nonsense. It’s all hyperbole.

    Folks do know the difference between Inauguration Day executive orders and the establishment of a dictatorship.

    When a Republican issues executive orders on Jan. 20, that’s a dictatorship. When a Democrat does it, that’s restoring Democracy, as the name indicates.

    Is anyone so stupid or brainwashed as to believe that? I just think they’ve overplayed their hand.

    ###

    I note that much of this discussion about delusional thinking digressed into a conversation about religious belief vs. non-belief. 

    Political parties are not supposed to be religious in our country, but there are true believers on both sides who connect (or “cling”, if you wish) to various Words and policy choices with the gaga enthusiasm of zealots and speakers-in-tongues.

    The irony of it all, this political go-round, is that the largely secular zealots on the Far Left so believe their own crazy illusions (e.g. those listed above) that they’re reducing to secondary position their most advantageous point of attack: the right’s vulnerability on policies leaning on supernatural authorities and storylines.

    “Christian Nationalism” as a catch phrase may overstate the threat, but its underlying sentiment has opened up a couple of new battle fronts where the Right stands likely to put one up in the “L” column. The post-Dobbs plebescites you know about. Now along comes the Ten Commandments mandate for the Louisiana schools.

    On the latter, you can see why the Left doesn’t want the kids reading those tablets. Louisiana might use the version where X marks the Commandment reading “Thou Shalt Not Covet Thy Neighbor’s Goods.” In other words, the Tablet Author Upstairs wants to ban the central economic motivator of the Democrat Party. 

     

    • #25
  26. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Jim Kearney (View Comment):
    I just don’t believe many voters are dumb enough to believe any of this nonsense. It’s all hyperbole.

    They may not really believe it, but they use it as a cudgel against the Right. You don’t have to believe in the verbal attacks you use.

    • #26
  27. Jim Kearney Member
    Jim Kearney
    @JimKearney

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Jim Kearney (View Comment):
    I just don’t believe many voters are dumb enough to believe any of this nonsense. It’s all hyperbole.

    They may not really believe it, but they use it as a cudgel against the Right. You don’t have to believe in the verbal attacks you use.

    Insincere attacks show disrespect for the audience. Taking party mythology to extremes annoys me and hopefully, others.

    • #27
  28. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Jim Kearney (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Jim Kearney (View Comment):
    I just don’t believe many voters are dumb enough to believe any of this nonsense. It’s all hyperbole.

    They may not really believe it, but they use it as a cudgel against the Right. You don’t have to believe in the verbal attacks you use.

    Insincere attacks show disrespect for the audience. Taking party mythology to extremes annoys me and hopefully, others.

    And yet you worry about the insincere attacks the Left makes. Curious.

    The Russian collusion hoax. Jussie Smollett being attacked in the notorious MAGA hotbed neighborhood of Streeterville in Chicago. The Border Patrol “whipping” illegals. Hunter’s laptop being “Russian disinformation.” The Wuhan lab leak theory being a racist conspiracy theory. The AlfaBank communication backchannel. Some of them, like the Covington kids confronting a Native American veteran collapsed when someone bothered to watch thirty seconds of additional available video. Even National Review lost their poop over that one.

    “We can’t call out their nonsense … Wapo will write mean things about us!”

    • #28
  29. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Percival (View Comment):

    Jim Kearney (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Jim Kearney (View Comment):
    I just don’t believe many voters are dumb enough to believe any of this nonsense. It’s all hyperbole.

    They may not really believe it, but they use it as a cudgel against the Right. You don’t have to believe in the verbal attacks you use.

    Insincere attacks show disrespect for the audience. Taking party mythology to extremes annoys me and hopefully, others.

    And yet you worry about the insincere attacks the Left makes. Curious.

    The Russian collusion hoax. Jussie Smollett being attacked in the notorious MAGA hotbed neighborhood of Streeterville in Chicago. The Border Patrol “whipping” illegals. Hunter’s laptop being “Russian disinformation.” The Wuhan lab leak theory being a racist conspiracy theory. The AlfaBank communication backchannel. Some of them, like the Covington kids confronting a Native American veteran collapsed when someone bothered to watch thirty seconds of additional available video. Even National Review lost their poop over that one.

    “We can’t call out their nonsense … Wapo will write mean things about us!”

    NRO

    Throwing non approved conservatives under the bus for 20 years.

    • #29
  30. Jim Kearney Member
    Jim Kearney
    @JimKearney

    Percival (View Comment):
    And yet you worry about the insincere attacks the Left makes. Curious.

    How does this relate to what I said?

    • #30
Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.