The First Cut is the Deepest

 

During the last few years, my intellectual and emotional energy has been devoted to three areas—the first involved pickleball. There was a group of players on public courts not far from me who cheerfully whacked the plastic ball across the net and expressed considerable joy and excitement at the results. I thought, “This looks like fun.”

Perhaps because this was at the beginning of the great Covid lockdowns, I also began to explore new intellectual areas of interest. I discovered “A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs” at songs.com where Andrew Hickey analyzed the history of rock and roll which was very much the soundtrack of my youth.

Later, after making many new friends through pickleball, my friends came to me for advice on their medical problems.  Since they knew I was a doctor, and because I was their friend, they felt compelled to tell me everything about their life.

I remain passionately involved in my small pickleball community. I’ve been exploring the meaning and significance of the huge number of songs and albums that I was aware of but hadn’t tried to understand. And most of all I have become a volunteer patient advocate for my friends who look up to me for medical advice. Anyone who wants my advice only needs to bring me their imaging, studies, and medical records and I will try to make sense of it.

It is a strange journey that continues to evolve. The medical problems seem to get more and more complicated. I have learned that the first cut is the deepest. And that is both exhilarating and humbling.

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There are 11 comments.

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  1. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    I had the album that contained that song. The version I had had been put out in Germany. (I probably still have it buried in a closet.) I see no evidence of it in Wikipedia’s discography for Stevens. Go figure.

    • #1
  2. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    Arahant (View Comment):

    I had the album that contained that song. The version I had had been put out in Germany. (I probably still have it buried in a closet.) I see no evidence of it in Wikipedia’s discography for Stevens. Go figure.

    Yeah, I always associated that song with Rod Stewart not the artist formerly known as Cat Stevens but I have learned everything is more complex than it seems at first.

    • #2
  3. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):
    Yeah, I always associated that song with Rod Stewart not the artist formerly known as Cat Stevens but I have learned everything is more complex than it seems at first.

    Especially with songs.

    • #3
  4. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    Another great example of that is the song “Love Hurts” written by Bouldleaux Bryant and covered by every great band of the last half century. His name comes up a lot when you begin to explore the roots of rock and country music.

    • #4
  5. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):

    Another great example of that is the song “Love Hurts” written by Bouldleaux Bryant and covered by every great band of the last half century. His name comes up a lot when you begin to explore the roots of rock and country music.

    Indeed. I immediately thought of the Roy Orbison version, although the Everly Brothers recorded it first.

    • #5
  6. Southern Pessimist Member
    Southern Pessimist
    @SouthernPessimist

    About twenty years ago, I had a conversation with Robert Pinsky (our poet laureate at the time) about the poetic contributions of modern songwriters such as Dylan and he dismissed my  comments about Dylan but did concede that the Bryant team in Nashville was worthy of consideration as true poets.

    I am sure that Dylan’s Nobel prize must have chapped him worse than sandpaper knickers.

    • #6
  7. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Southern Pessimist (View Comment):
    About twenty years ago, I had a conversation with Robert Pinsky about the poetic contributions of modern songwriters such as Dylan and he dismissed my  comments about Dylan but did concede that the Bryant team in Nashville was worthy of consideration as true poets.

    Can’t argue with him on that.

    • #7
  8. The Scarecrow Thatcher
    The Scarecrow
    @TheScarecrow

    Couldn’t care less about pickle ball, but the music thing looks fascinating. Is it just a website I can find?

    • #8
  9. OldPhil Coolidge
    OldPhil
    @OldPhil

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):

    Couldn’t care less about pickle ball, but the music thing looks fascinating. Is it just a website I can find?

    A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs

    • #9
  10. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    OldPhil (View Comment):

    The Scarecrow (View Comment):

    Couldn’t care less about pickle ball, but the music thing looks fascinating. Is it just a website I can find?

    A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs

    Oh, that is good!

    Bookmarked.

    • #10
  11. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    I’m wondering if “Poppa Was A Rolling Stone” is among the 500 songs. I think it’s even better than “I Heard It Through The Grapevine”. The line in the song “ When he died, all he left us was alone” is just so powerful. 

    • #11
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