Dachau Liberation: There is no Liberation

 

At the end of Special Report on Fox News last night, they had a brief, special item: the commemoration of the liberation of Dachau, the renowned concentration camp in Germany. Instead of my usual sadness, I felt rage, as I scanned the skeletal human beings being helped to leave the camp:

On April 27, 1945, approximately 7,000 prisoners, mostly Jews, were forced to begin a death march from Dachau to Tegernsee, far to the south. The next day, many of the SS guards abandoned the camp. On April 29, the Dachau main camp was liberated by units of the 45th Infantry after a brief battle with the camp’s remaining guards.

As they neared the camp, the Americans found more than 30 railroad cars filled with bodies in various states of decomposition. Inside the camp there were more bodies and 30,000 survivors, most severely emaciated. Some of the American troops who liberated Dachau were so appalled by conditions at the camp that they machine-gunned at least two groups of captured German guards. It is officially reported that 30 SS guards were killed in this fashion, but conspiracy theorists have alleged that more than 10 times that number were executed by the American liberators. The German citizens of the town of Dachau were later forced to bury the 9,000 dead inmates found at the camp.

Almost no countries took in the Jews during the war, and those who did, did so at great risk. Even the U.S. and FDR tried to ignore the horrible story which was impossible to believe and initially closed the doors to the Jews:

Prisoners at Dachau were used as forced laborers, initially in the construction and expansion of the camp and later for German armaments production. The camp served as the training center for SS concentration camp guards and was a model for other Nazi concentration camps. Dachau was also the first Nazi camp to use prisoners as human guinea pigs in medical experiments. At Dachau, Nazi scientists tested the effects of freezing and changes to atmospheric pressure on inmates, infected them with malaria and tuberculosis and treated them with experimental drugs, and forced them to test methods of making seawater potable and of halting excessive bleeding. Hundreds of prisoners died or were crippled as a result of these experiments.

But that’s history, right?

*     *     *     *

To address the protestors across the country, you are in the process of re-establishing a new Nazi regime. Although you decry genocide, you are following in the footsteps of those who killed six million Jews and a total of 12 million people. At least they knew what they were fighting for, instead of following their leaders like lemmings.

George Washington in his letter to the Hebrew Community of Newport Rhode Island, assured us we had found a new home. Eventually we came to believe that we’d found a haven after World War II. Slowly, over time, exclusive organizations opened their doors, including universities.

But at this time we are condemned by the administration, faculty and students.

Are the doors closing once again? Are we being blamed for the problems of the world? Has the one country in the world who welcomed us begun to rue its decision?

Are we discovering, once again, that liberation is not attainable?

 

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  1. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

     Almost no countries took in the Jews during the war, and those who did, did so at great risk.

    Nobody talks about this, but the president of Haiti wanted to take in 40,000 Jews before World War II and FDR said “no”. They obviously need 40,000 Jews now. 

    • #1
  2. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Almost no countries took in the Jews during the war, and those who did, did so at great risk.

    Nobody talks about this, but the president of Haiti wanted to take in 40,000 Jews before World War II and FDR said “no”. They obviously need 40,000 Jews now.

    I wasn’t aware of that, Rufus. Thanks.

    • #2
  3. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Almost no countries took in the Jews during the war, and those who did, did so at great risk.

    Nobody talks about this, but the president of Haiti wanted to take in 40,000 Jews before World War II and FDR said “no”. They obviously need 40,000 Jews now.

    How did FDR control Haiti before WWII?

     

    • #3
  4. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Almost no countries took in the Jews during the war, and those who did, did so at great risk.

    Nobody talks about this, but the president of Haiti wanted to take in 40,000 Jews before World War II and FDR said “no”. They obviously need 40,000 Jews now.

    How did FDR control Haiti before WWII?

     

    He would have controlled when and where the State Department sprinkled Uncle Sam’s largesse. That could have been enough.

    • #4
  5. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    The USA was in charge of  the security for Haiti. Not cooperating would have been a big diplomatic headache. I still don’t see what the big deal is. Photos and fingerprints. Make them report in every month or something. Big deal.

    I’m not an expert, but that’s the way I see it.

    The Caribbean is such a vortex and it would’ve been a lot better with Jews running some of it.

    • #5
  6. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Today’s anti-Semitism in America…which is very closely linked to anti-American attitudes as well…is largely an ‘elite’ college phenomenon. Those are the places where it is most prevalent, and those are also the places where it is most tolerated.  

    Yesterday at Twitter, there was a post:

    I’m a left-wing Jew. I’ve never been to Israel. I’ve abhorred Netanyahu for years. I’ve always wanted peace to prevail. And here’s how 7/10, yhe war, and the way “peace protestors” have changed the way I see things permanently….

    (continues for multiple short posts)

    I made a very short comment:

    Much of the hate for Jews is closely coupled with hate for the United States, and, in many cases, for civilization in any form. The comment has so far garnered 893 ‘likes’….there are a few disagreements and hostile comments, but overall, the point seems to resonate.    

     

    • #6
  7. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    David Foster (View Comment):
    I’m a left-wing Jew. I’ve never been to Israel. I’ve abhorred Netanyahu for years. I’ve always wanted peace to prevail. And here’s how 7/10, yhe war, and the way “peace protestors” have changed the way I see things permanently….

    Anyone on the left abhors Netanyahu, David; it’s the thing to do. How did he explain that those actions changed the way he sees things–hate the Israelis or hate Hamas?

    • #7
  8. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    Anyone on the left abhors Netanyahu, David; it’s the thing to do. How did he explain that those actions changed the way he sees things–hate the Israelis or hate Hamas?

    Best to read his whole series of posts.  

    I was idealistic before and was even open to a one state solution because I believed *most* Palestinians surely didn’t actually want to kill Jewish people. After watching them join in on and celebrate the massacre of 7/10 – I now have serious worries peace can ever happen.

    Listening to Palestinian academics and students around the world has shocked me. Most I have heard speak, have an antisemitism problem *so profound* that it negates their ability to be fit to do their job.

    Listening to left-wing students and academics, journalists, Marxist groups and other organisations I previously trusted like the UN or Amnesty, I see there is also a *profound* problem with antisemitism that makes many unfit for their roles.

    I have seen Muslim people I previously respected engaging repeatedly antisemitic tropes as well as using their positions to target Israel and Jewish people in a way that’s made me see a profound problem with antisemitism within Muslim groups also.

    (more)

    OK, he should have seen all this *years ago*, but better late than never.  

    • #8
  9. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    David Foster (View Comment):
    OK, he should have seen all this *years ago*, but better late than never.  

    I’m thrilled! I’m so glad that he now has clarity. Thanks for adding his follow-on comments.

    • #9
  10. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    It seems appropriate to post the symbol of the 45th Infantry Division, a thunderbird.

    The Division contained many American Indian members, and its original symbol had reflected that fact–it was a symbol used by some of the southwestern tribes, a sun sign, I believe, and it looked rather like a swastika.  As WWII approached, it was changed to the thunderbird for obvious reasons.

     

    • #10
  11. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    David Foster (View Comment):

    It seems appropriate to post the symbol of the 45th Infantry Division, a thunderbird.

    The Division contained many American Indian members, and its original symbol had reflected that fact–it was a symbol used by some of the southwestern tribes, a sun sign, I believe, and it looked rather like a swastika. As WWII approached, it was changed to the thunderbird for obvious reasons.

     

    A swastika rotated 45° counter clockwise, with the same color scheme. They made the change in 1939.

    • #11
  12. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Almost no countries took in the Jews during the war, and those who did, did so at great risk.

    Nobody talks about this, but the president of Haiti wanted to take in 40,000 Jews before World War II and FDR said “no”. They obviously need 40,000 Jews now.

    How did FDR control Haiti before WWII?

    According to the US State Department, the US occupied Haiti from 1915-1934.

    https://history.state.gov/milestones/1914-1920/haiti

    https://2001-2009.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/wwi/88275.htm#:~:text=Under%20interventionist%20policies%20of%20the,This%20occupation%20continued%20until%201934.

     

    • #12
  13. GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms Reagan
    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms
    @GLDIII

    I visited Dachau in 2000. It was one of the most somber and sobering experiences of my adult life. It makes you confront the reality of broken nature of the humanity.

    The French Rousseanian’s were  wrong on the “state of man’s nature”, that we are basically sympathetic and peaceful. A tour of that place in Bavaria will make you appreciate what the Founder’s vision for self government and their understanding of the human heart tried to navigate.

    • #13
  14. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Ma… (View Comment):

    I visited Dachau in 2000. It was one of the most somber and sobering experiences of my adult life. It makes you confront the reality of broken nature of the humanity.

    The French Rousseanian’s were wrong on the “state of man’s nature”, that we are basically sympathetic and peaceful. A tour of that place in Bavaria will make you appreciate what the Founder’s vision for self government and their understanding of the human heart tried to navigate.

    I visited Dachau on my way back from Israel with a friend over 50 years ago. I was so shocked I could barely speak, and my friend cried most of the way through. It’s the photographs that especially stayed with me. Thanks, Jerry.

    • #14
  15. QuietPI Member
    QuietPI
    @Quietpi

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Ma… (View Comment):

    I visited Dachau in 2000. It was one of the most somber and sobering experiences of my adult life. It makes you confront the reality of broken nature of the humanity.

    The French Rousseanian’s were wrong on the “state of man’s nature”, that we are basically sympathetic and peaceful. A tour of that place in Bavaria will make you appreciate what the Founder’s vision for self government and their understanding of the human heart tried to navigate.

    I visited Dachau on my way back from Israel with a friend over 50 years ago. I was so shocked I could barely speak, and my friend cried most of the way through. It’s the photographs that especially stayed with me. Thanks, Jerry.

    And I in July, 2022.  It was near the end of a two – week tour of sites important to the Reformation, chiefly Luther.  One afternoon.  With all the really important places and things we saw in those two weeks, Dachau comes to mind first as I think about the trip.  

    And it’s the strangest thing – when I tell others about the tour, the moment I mention Dachau, it seems they ask about Dachau first.  

    There’s that group at UCLA that has set up a big screen, showing the rioters videos of October 7.  They should intersperse those with scenes of the “resettlement camps.”  

    • #15
  16. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Ma… (View Comment):
    The French Rousseanian’s were  wrong on the “state of man’s nature”, that we are basically sympathetic and peaceful. A tour of that place in Bavaria will make you appreciate what the Founder’s vision for self government and their understanding of the human heart tried to navigate.

    The Founders understood that the issue is centralized power. Every citizen has to have that view in their hearts. 

     

     

     

    • #16
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