The Crucifixion of George Zimmerman

 

As I write these words, Benjamin Jealous, the President of the NAACP, is arguing that it is nearly impossible for an African-American to get justice in this country. He is demanding that the Department of Justice charge George Zimmerman in federal court with conspiring to deprive Trayvon Martin of his civil rights, and he claims to have collected one million signatures on a petition making the same demand. Attorney General Eric Holder is exploring this very possibility; Holder’s friends among The New Black Panthers have put a bounty on George Zimmerman’s head; and his underlings at the Department of Justice have set up an email address so that citizens can send them the dirt on George Zimmerman. A witch hunt is underway.

Of course, there is a case to be made that there has been a conspiracy to deprive an American citizen of his civil rights, and the citizen in question would, indeed, qualify under federal law as an African-American. But the citizen whose rights were threatened was not Trayvon Martin. It was George Zimmerman himself, and the men who should be charged are those who have orchestrated the witch hunt underway now for more than a year. Eric Holder and Barack Obama are first on this list. And the top brass at NBC, The New York Times, CNN, CBS, and ABC as well as the special prosecutor, the presiding judge, and the leadership of the NAACP should be arraigned alongside them.

Think a bit about what has happened. On February 26, 2012, George Zimmerman, a longtime captain in the Neighborhood Watch in Sanford, Florida, was cruising the high-crime neighborhood in which he lived. He had been doing this for years, and he had assisted in a number of arrests. If you resided in such a place, you would be grateful to public-spirited citizens such as Zimmerman, who year in and year out worked to make it less unsafe to live there. He is one among many such unsung American heroes, and the treatment meted out to him — even by conservatives, one of whom described him back in 2012 as a vigilante and another of whom has suggested in the last few days that he should have been charged with negligent homicide — is a disgrace.

In the course of this particular tour by car, Zimmerman noticed someone wearing a hoodie — an outfit favored by burglars and thieves because it makes identification difficult — who was behaving in a suspicious manner, wandering about and looking in the windows of darkened houses as if he was casing them for a break-in. Zimmerman called 911, alerted the police to the situation, and, when the person in the hoodie suddenly left the street and cut between two houses, he followed him on foot a certain distance. All of this is a matter of public record.

Contrary to claims repeatedly broadcast by the media, Zimmerman was not told not to follow the suspect. Nor was he instructed by the police dispatcher to return to his car. He was told that following the suspect was unnecessary. That is all. The worst that can be said of him in this regard is that he put himself in danger. What he did was not in any respect immoral or improper; it was courageous. He had every right to attempt to keep the suspect in view. There had been a rash of burglaries in the neighborhood.

According to his own testimony, when told by the police dispatcher that what he was doing was unnecessary, Zimmerman returned in the direction of his car, was attacked, knocked down, had his head slammed repeatedly into the concrete sidewalk, and was told by his assailant that he was going to die. When the man on top of him noticed his gun and reached for it, Zimmerman claimed, he grabbed it first and shot his assailant in self-defense.

As the police soon discovered, the physical evidence gibed perfectly with Zimmerman’s claims. His nose is broken. His face was bloody. There was plenty of blood on the back of his head. Trayvon Martin, the person in the hoodie, had been shot at very close quarters but was otherwise unharmed. Moreover, there was a witness who testified that Martin had Zimmerman under him and was pummeling him and that Zimmerman was yelling for help and asking that 911 be called. The local police and the local district attorney weighed the evidence and rightly concluded that the shooting was an act of self-defense.

Then, on the 8th of March, as this timeline conveniently provided by Breitbart.com makes clear, the drumbeat began. Trayvon Martin’s parents — who were, with the help of a lawyer named Benjamin Crump, hoping to cash in by suing the gated community where George Zimmerman lived — appeared on CBS This Morning, demanding that Zimmerman be tried; and that very day the Associated Press racialized the story, falsely asserting that Zimmerman was white (a claim, incidentally, that it repeated two days ago).

On March 13, 2012, MSNBC’s Al Sharpton picked up the theme, and that same day Matt Guttman, an ABC reporter in Miami, began peddling the completely unsubstantiated claim that Zimmerman shot Martin because he was black. When it was discovered that Zimmerman’s mother is Peruvian, he was turned by The New York Times and Reuters into “a white Hispanic.” No one in the mainstream media went to the trouble of discovering that most of the man’s forebears on his mother’s side were native Americans and that he had a grandparent of African extraction.

Eight days thereafter, CNN falsely reported that, in his conversation with the police dispatcher, Zimmerman had referred to Martin as “a f___ing coon.” It took them weeks to retract the claim (and this past weekend Nancy Grace resurrected this false charge).

It was at this point that Eric Holder’s Department of Justice got into the act, organizing demonstrations in Florida and flying Al Sharpton in to stir up the crowd with the following words:

Trayvon could have been any one of our sons. Trayvon could have been any one of us. . . We are tired of going to jail for nothing and others going home for something. Zimmerman should have been arrested that night … you cannot defend yourself against a pack of Skittles and iced tea. Don’t talk to us like we’re stupid! Don’t talk to us like we’re ignorant! We love our children like you love yours. Lock him up! . . .

We cannot allow a legal precedent to be established in this city that tells us it is legal for a man to kill us, tell any story he wants, and walks out with the murder weapon.

A day later, on the 23rd of March, the President of the United States, entered the fray, sounding the same theme as Sharpton: “Trayvon could have been any one of our sons. If I had a son, he would look like Trayvon.” The subtext was unmistakable.

Four days later, NBC broadcast on The Today Show an edited tape. Here is the actual exchange between Zimmerman and the police dispatcher:

Zimmerman: This guy looks like he’s up to no good. Or he’s on drugs or something. It’s raining and he’s just walking around, looking about.

Dispatcher: OK, and this guy — is he black, white or Hispanic?

Zimmerman: He looks black.

Here is the exchange as edited and presented by NBC:

Zimmerman: This guy looks like he’s up to no good. He looks black.

A day later ABC News falsely reported: “A police surveillance video taken the night that Trayvon Martin was shot dead shows no blood or bruises on George Zimmerman.”

A day thereafter, on NBC Chris Matthews chimed in:

George Zimmerman says he shot Trayvon Martin after Trayvon broke his nose and repeatedly slammed the back of his head into a concrete sidewalk, but newly released video tape of Zimmerman arriving at the police station–we’re looking at it there–appears to show no evidence of a broken nose or obvious wounds to the back of Zimmerman’s head.

Had ABC or NBC bothered to enhance the grainy photograph, as they easily could have, the damage done George Zimmerman would have become visible.

Finally, of course, on 11 April 2012 — after the Republican Governor of Florida, collapsing like a house of cards before the media onslaught, appointed a special prosecutor — Zimmerman was arrested and charged with second-degree murder. Eric Holder had in the meantime dispatched 18 FBI agents to dig up dirt on the man. The rest, I suspect, you know.

It is the duty of a defense attorney to defend his client and to make the prosecution prove its case. It is not his duty to see that justice is done. His proper stance is adversarial. It is his responsibility to be a partisan. The defendant is to be presumed innocent until and unless he is proven guilty.

In our system of justice, the duty of a prosecutor differs markedly from that of a defense attorney. He is not supposed to be a partisan of anyone or anything — apart from the rule of law. He is not supposed to be adversarial. It is his duty to do justice. If he has no case, it is incumbent on him to seek a dismissal of charges. If he has evidence favorable to the defense, it is his duty to provide them with that evidence in a timely fashion.

In the case of George Zimmerman, the special prosecutor, Angela Corey, made inflammatory statements to the press in such a manner as to attempt to bias the jury pool. Her team more than once delayed for months in providing pertinent evidence to the defense. In one crucial particular, the defense learned about the existence of exculpatory evidence only when alerted by an IT specialist in her office, who has since been fired for performing the duty incumbent on her.

The judge at the preliminary hearing, in a situation in which the prosecution presented not one shred of evidence suggesting even the possibility of second-degree murder, nonetheless accepted the charge. When the trial was finally held and it became evident, after the prosecution rested, that Angela Corey and her assistants had no case, the judge once again refused a defense motion to dismiss the charges. And when the defense opted not to call George Zimmerman to the stand, as was their right, the judge took it upon herself to directly question him in front of the jury before all the testimony had  been heard in a fashion unprecedented, unprofessional, and prejudicial to the case presented by the defense.

The jury in this trial was not told that Trayvon Martin had been suspended from high school in October, 2011 for having burglary tools and stolen jewelry in his locker. They were not informed that he had been suspended a second time in February 2012 when he was caught with marijuana and a marijuana pipe. They were not told that the only reason that he had no criminal record is that the police chief in Miami-Dade county wanted to make it seem as if juvenile crime had gone down. They were not made aware of the taste for violence that Martin had displayed on his social media page. The photographs on Martin’s cell phone, showing him smoking pot and holding a gun, were also not made available to the jury. This evidence — suggesting that Martin was a punk more than capable of burglary and obsessed with violence — was deemed inadmissible.

In short, over the course of more than a year, the President of the United States, the Attorney General of the United States, the country’s leading media outlets, the special prosecutor, and the presiding judge did everything in their power to railroad into prison an innocent man. And in the process they ruined his life.

It is perfectly possible that George Zimmerman will be murdered. To this end, Spike Lee and Roseanne Barr early on tried to broadcast to all and sundry his address. Presumably with the same end in mind, CNN recently revealed his social security number, his telephone number, and his address. To this end, a star professional football player predicted that Zimmerman would not last a year. Threats are being tweeted now with great regularity. Zimmerman and his parents have gone into hiding. Riots are now being staged. And the leadership of the NAACP, the Majority Leader of the United States Senate, the prosecutors in the case, and the likes of Nancy Grace on CNN are doing everything that they can to whip up sentiment against the man in the manner of a lynch mob.

Even, however, if George Zimmerman manages to escape assassination, he will be a marked man for the rest of his life; and there is absolutely nothing that he can do to rectify the situation. He has been tried and condemned in the court of public opinion. Marion Barry has, in a celebratory manner, announced that Zimmerman will never know peace, and he is right.

Barack Obama now piously proposes that “we honor Trayvon Martin,” the burglar and dope-head who attacked and tried to murder George Zimmerman, and that we do so by working to “stem the tide of gun violence.” The implication of his remarks is that Martin was an innocent worthy of deep respect and honor and that George Zimmerman is a scoundrel who should not have been accorded the right of self-defense.

I am old enough to remember how George Wallace subtly played on the fears and racial prejudices of white Americans. In my brief time as a newspaper reporter back in 1968, I attended a press conference he gave, and I covered a rally he staged in Oklahoma City. I have seen visceral hatred up close, and I have watched a master demagogue at work.

I regret to have to say that the first African-American President of the United States and the first African-American Attorney General are cut from similar cloth. Like their associate and instrument Al Sharpton, they are racist demagogues who prey on the fears and prejudices of black Americans. And these days, our media elite, their supporters on the liberal left, and the leaders of the NAACP are no better. In pursuit of a racialist narrative, they all conspired to deny George Zimmerman a fair trial.

That Zimmerman managed nonetheless to get an acquittal is testimony to his patience and to the perseverance and courage of his lawyers. They, the Sanford police who originally investigated the slaying of Trayvon Martin, the local district attorney who reviewed the evidence and chose not to prosecute, and the members of the jury deserve accolades. Everyone else involved in this shameful business should be cashiered forthwith. The prosecutors should be disbarred, as Alan Dershowitz has argued. The judge should be impeached, and everyone else should be fired and driven with contempt and loathing from the public square.

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  1. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BrentB67

    Dr Rahe if Trayvon Martin had been carrying a gun, or even a knife I think there is a very good possibility that George Zimmerman would be dead. If George Zimmerman had been killed in the altercation rather than using justified self defense as was the case and for which he should’ve never been charged would we still think Zimmerman a hero or would we think he was foolish?

    If Trayvon had killed George Zimmerman we may not even be discussing it or never heard about it outside of our members in FL.

    • #1
  2. Profile Photo Inactive
    @TheMugwump

    We should be grateful to the Founding Fathers for the verdict in the Zimmerman case.  Despite every effort by a tyrannical administration to railroad an innocent man for the purpose of pushing a political agenda, the American system of checks and balances actually worked as it was designed.  This is something Barack Obama doesn’t appear to understand.  Or if he does understand, he considers it a nuisance.  An independent judiciary (the judge and prosecutor in this case not withstanding) was able to render a decision based on the opinion of a panel composed of ordinary citizens.  This case is precisely the reason our Founders established a provision in the Constitution for judgment by a jury of one’s peers.  We can tip our hats as well to the noblemen and noble men who drafted the Magna Carta.  Tyranny was thwarted last weekend in a Florida courtroom.  We have reason to be sanguine. 

    • #2
  3. Profile Photo Member
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Dr. Rahe, thank you for walking us back to the beginning of this, and making it clear who, exactly, is responsible for turning this into the Circus of Race Hustlers.

    It took a few weeks before this went nationwide, and it only did so because there was a real effort by several people to ensure it went nationwide.

    It was never about justice. It was about whipping up racial tensions prior to an election to keep the white guilt at a high level and keep the base energized. It was about money and power and fame.

    Paul A. Rahe: Everyone else involved in this shameful business should be cashiered forthwith. The prosecutors should be disbarred, as Alan Dershowitz has argued. The judge should be impeached, and everyone else should be fired and driven with contempt and loathing from the public square.

    “Everyone else” includes Eric Holder and Barack Obama.

    Eric Holder is so evil the devil himself threw in the towel saying “I can’t compete with that.”

    • #3
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    @tabularasa

    Excellent summary and comments.  

    Mr. Obama and Mr. Holder haven’t the slightest interest in healing racial wounds.  Their whole game is racial (Martin/Zimmerman and Professor Gates), gender (the war on Sandra Fluke), ethnic (all the immigration stuff) and LGBT (calling Jason Collins when he bravely told the world he’s gay). All those divides are crucial to them:  they protect them as their greatest possessions.

    Alan Dershowitz occasionally comes out of the liberal fog to say some wise, and true things.  This time it was about the Zimmerman prosecutors.  More often, he debunks leftist garbage about Israel.

    • #4
  5. Profile Photo Member
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    One factual correction.  Zimmerman wasn’t out patrolling or “cruising” the neighborhood.  He was on his way to the store; Target, if memory serves.  

    It’s a significant distinction because of the desperation  to portray Zimmerman as a wanna-be cop who was looking for trouble.

    • #5
  6. Profile Photo Inactive
    @StarvetheBeast

    Black America has been told since the sixties that they’re victims, that nothing they do is their fault.

    “Of course you can’t get a job. Because of slavery. Of course you drop of of school. Because of racism. Of course your subculture glorifies violence, because of lynchings that happened decades before you were born.”

    The left tells them this because it keeps the large majority of blacks voting for the left. What we’re seeing in this article is the result.

    Actually, Ben Jealous is right that the desperate social state of at-risk urban black America is the fault of white society, just not in the way he thinks.

    • #6
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    @DrewInWisconsin

    George Zimmerman was a nobody and the incident was nothing compared to what happens in Chicago on any given weekend. 

    But to achieve the advancement of the Party, George Zimmerman had to become Emmanuel Goldstein.

    • #7
  8. Profile Photo Coolidge
    @ctlaw

    Ironically, Zimmerman is clearly less white than Jealous is and likely nearly as much African.

    • #8
  9. Profile Photo Contributor
    @PaulARahe
    BrentB67: Dr Rahe if Trayvon Martin had been carrying a gun, or even a knife I think there is a very good possibility that George Zimmerman would be dead. If George Zimmerman had been killed in the altercation rather than using justified self defense as was the case and for which he should’ve never been charged would we still think Zimmerman a hero or would we think he was foolish?

    If Trayvon had killed George Zimmerman we may not even be discussing it or never heard about it outside of our members in FL. · 44 minutes ago

    I would, in such circumstances, regard George Zimmerman as a man who died in the course of pursuing his duty. He risked his life, and he almost lost it.

    • #9
  10. Profile Photo Contributor
    @PaulARahe
    Miffed White Male: One factual correction.  Zimmerman wasn’t out patrolling or “cruising” the neighborhood.  He was on his way to the store; Target, if memory serves.  

    It’s a significant distinction because of the desperation  to portray Zimmerman as a wanna-be cop who was looking for trouble. · 16 minutes ago

    Thanks for this. I presumed that it was his turn to patrol. That night he was just a guy with his eyes open.

    • #10
  11. Profile Photo Member
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    Here’s the saddest part.  Somewhere in America in the next few months, a white guy is going to see a black guy who looks suspicious.  And he’s not going to get involved, because it’s not worth the risk.

    And somebody’s going to wind up raped or dead as a result.

    • #11
  12. Profile Photo Inactive
    @flownover

    Red herring. These people never waste a crisis. And failing that,  create a crisis when needed . 

    While they’re yelling “squirrel !” to the dogs they take us to be, they’re doing something else or covering something else up . 

    I guess there are no shortages of things they need to cover up.

    And follow the money, I smell more reparations flowing out of this. Possibly a boost for the NAACP and CBC. Where is the SPLC in all this anyway ? Did Julian Bond sleep through the wakeup call ?

    • #12
  13. Profile Photo Contributor
    @TommyDeSeno

    Paul I’m not sure why you would think jewelry (not stolen jewelry – you’re supplying that modifier) and some marijuana residue would be relevant to the jurors’ inquiry. 

    If you think it proper to prejudice a jury with irrelevancies the purpose of which is to plant the seed that someone is not a good person, then I ask for your comments on whether the jury should have been told these things:

    1. This was Zimmerman’s 3rd run-in with the law for violent behavior;

    2. Zimmerman was previously arrested for assault on a police officer;

    3. Zimmerman was previously subject to a restraining order for violence against a woman;

    4. Zimmerman was admitted to a judicial diversionary program to avoid prison;

    5. Zimmerman was accused of sexual molestation of a female relative who was a minor.

    You ask if I would like him as my neighborhood watch captain?  I wouldn’t want him in my neighborhood.

    Considering the symbolism of the Crucifix in America, your use of term in reference to such a man is in poor taste.

    • #13
  14. Profile Photo Member
    @Misthiocracy

    Best all-around summary of the case I’ve read so far.

    Kudos, Prof. Rahe.

    • #14
  15. Profile Photo Contributor
    @TommyDeSeno
    Miffed White Male: Here’s the saddest part.  Somewhere in America in the next few months, a white guy is going to see a black guy who looks suspicious.  And he’s not going to get involved, because it’s not worth the risk.

    And somebody’s going to wind up raped or dead as a result. · 5 minutes ago

    Oh my.

    • #15
  16. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BrentB67
    Miffed White Male: Here’s the saddest part.  Somewhere in America in the next few months, a white guy is going to see a black guy who looks suspicious.  And he’s not going to get involved, because it’s not worth the risk.

    And somebody’s going to wind up raped or dead as a result. · 7 minutes ago

    Does calling the police count as getting involved?

    • #16
  17. Profile Photo Member
    @MiffedWhiteMale
    Tommy De Seno: Paul I’m not sure why you would think jewelry (not stolen jewelry – you’re supplying that modifier) and some marijuana residue would be relevant to the juror’s inquiry. 

    Ummm, the jewelry WAS stolen.  Not necessarily by Trayvon, but it was stolen.

    Relevence to the Jury aside, please don’t be making up “facts”.

    • #17
  18. Profile Photo Contributor
    @TommyDeSeno
    Miffed White Male

    Tommy De Seno: Paul I’m not sure why you would think jewelry (not stolen jewelry – you’re supplying that modifier) and some marijuana residue would be relevant to the juror’s inquiry. 

    Ummm, the jewelry WAS stolen.  Not necessarily by Trayvon, but it was stolen.

    Relevence to the Jury aside, please don’t be making up “facts”. · 0 minutes ago

    How do you know that?

    • #18
  19. Profile Photo Member
    @MiffedWhiteMale
    BrentB67

    Miffed White Male: Here’s the saddest part.  Somewhere in America in the next few months, a white guy is going to see a black guy who looks suspicious.  And he’s not going to get involved, because it’s not worth the risk.

    And somebody’s going to wind up raped or dead as a result. · 7 minutes ago

    Does calling the police count as getting involved? · 4 minutes ago

    Hey, it’s probably just a kid walking home in the rain.  Why bother.

    • #19
  20. Profile Photo Inactive
    @UreyP3
    Let’s look at what we know.  The evidence produced at trial established these facts:1.  Zimmerman had turned around and headed back to his car – as advised by the dispatcher 2.  Martin followed him and sucker-punched him, knocking him to the ground. 3.  Martin straddled the supine Zimmerman and repeatedly beat him with both fists. 4.  Martin, astraddle the supine Zimmerman, repeatedly beat his head against the concrete sidewalk. 5.  Martin told Zimmerman he was going to die.6.  Immediately before Zimmerman’s decision to shoot Martin was unblemished, uninjured except for minor abrasions to his knuckles from beating Zimmerman.  The only injuries were Zimmerman’s alone. 7.  Martin was bigger, younger and stronger than Zimmerman. Some questions arise for the critics of the Zimmerman acquittal: What should Zimmerman have done instead of shooting?            Should he have passively accepted the beating?             Was his fear of serious injury/death not reasonable under the circumstances?             What alternative was available to Zimmerman to prevent further injury?             Did Zimmerman have a right to protect himself?              When may deadly force be used in self-defense?             What responsibility does Martin bear for his actions?          How do you justify Martin’s assault of Zimmerman?
    • #20
  21. Profile Photo Inactive
    @TheMugwump
    Tommy De Seno

    1. This was Zimmerman’s 3rd run-in with the law for violent behavior;

    2. Zimmerman was previously arrested for assault on a police officer;

    3. Zimmerman was previously subject to a restraining order for violence against a woman;

    4. Zimmerman was admitted to a judicial diversionary program to avoid prison;

    5. Zimmerman was accused of sexual molestation of a female relative who was a minor.

    Tommy, most of the things you cite are sufficient to deny a person the purchase of a firearm.  If any one of your claims is true, why was Zimmerman allowed to legally carry a concealed weapon?  Are you suggesting something slipped through the cracks?    

    • #21
  22. Profile Photo Member
    @ColinBLane

    There are indeed many villains in this tragedy, but I’m not prepared yet to say that Judge Debra Nelson is one of them.

    Her strange interrogation of George Zimmerman might well merit some kind of disciplinary action, but probably not impeachment (unless someone can demonstrate clear collusion with the Obama Administration, which seems unlikely and more the stuff of conspiracy theory than reality). 

    As for her “accepting” the charge against Zimmerman at a preliminary hearing at which “the prosecution presented not one shred of evidence suggesting even the possibility of second-degree murder,” I think you’re being a little presumptuous.  I once had a defense attorney tell me that any prosecutor worth his salt could indict a ham sandwich if he wanted to. The preliminary hearing process is very much stacked against a defendant, and the prosecution will usually present only evidence most favorable to their case at that point.

    As for her refusal to direct a verdict for Zimmerman after the prosecution rested, here’s a different take: she likely suspected an acquittal was on the way, and deemed that outcome preferable under the circumstances. We don’t know what was on her mind [continued]

    • #22
  23. Profile Photo Member
    @ColinBLane

    [continued] and frankly, I don’t ever like the “everyone’s in on the fix” narrative. Sounds too much like the Kennedy assassination paranoia to me.

    • #23
  24. Profile Photo Contributor
    @TommyDeSeno
    UreyP3: Let’s look at what we know.  The evidence produced at trial established these facts:

    Established? 

    I’m not sure why you say you know this. 

    • #24
  25. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BrentB67
    Miffed White Male

    BrentB67

    Miffed White Male: Here’s the saddest part.  Somewhere in America in the next few months, a white guy is going to see a black guy who looks suspicious.  And he’s not going to get involved, because it’s not worth the risk.

    And somebody’s going to wind up raped or dead as a result. · 7 minutes ago

    Does calling the police count as getting involved? · 4 minutes ago

    Hey, it’s probably just a kid walking home in the rain.  Why bother. · 5 minutes ago

    I think in the Zimmerman case the reason he bothered was based on the recent crime history in the neighborhood and the weather. Zimmerman’s calling the police seemed reasonable and was a good act for his neighborhood.

    Is it your position that the only way to get involved is to pursue a suspicious person while armed?

    • #25
  26. Profile Photo Member
    @DrewInWisconsin
    Colin B Lane: . . . and frankly, I don’t ever like the “everyone’s in on the fix” narrative. Sounds too much like the Kennedy assassination paranoia to me.

    We live in interesting times. Times in which things that seemed like paranoia turn out to be true.

    • #26
  27. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Pelayo
    Tommy De Seno: Paul I’m not sure why you would think jewelry (not stolen jewelry – you’re supplying that modifier) and some marijuana residue would be relevant to the juror’s inquiry. 

    Tommy – that information may not be admissible as evidence in the courtroom, but it is certainly relevant in the court of public opinion where Trayvon Martin is being portrayed as some kind of angelic martyr.  Zimmerman may not be a Boy Scout, but he still has a right to alert police to suspicious activity and in Florida he has a Concealed Weapons Permit and a right to defend himself when being pummeled by a 5’11” tall, 158 pound, 17-year old who clearly was in much better shape than Zimmerman.  Zimmerman did not simply come across Trayvon Martin eating his Skittles and decide to open fire.  I have enjoyed many of your posts on this site in the past, but I have to disagree with your view on this one.

    • #27
  28. Profile Photo Contributor
    @TommyDeSeno

    Oh I forgot one:

    Please add to the prior list of Zimmerman malfeasance the Bill Clinton transgression of lying to a Judge (recall Zimmerman’s bail revocation for lying about his assets).

    Truly a Christ-like figure, that George Zimmerman.

    If only Jesus had popped a cap in Judas, the symmetry would be perfect.

    Good grief.

    • #28
  29. Profile Photo Member
    @ColinBLane
    DrewInWisconsin

    Colin B Lane: . . . and frankly, I don’t ever like the “everyone’s in on the fix” narrative. Sounds too much like the Kennedy assassination paranoia to me.

    We live in interesting times. Times in which things that seemed like paranoia turn out to be true. 

    Agreed, and I’m prepared to concede that the prosecutor’s charge of second degree murder and concealment of exculpatory evidence was reprehensible. But to suggest that the trial judge was willing to jeopardize her career (and perhaps even risk jail time) to participate in some massive conspiracy is a bridge too far for me, even in these interesting times.

    • #29
  30. Profile Photo Contributor
    @TommyDeSeno
    Mario the Gator

    Tommy De Seno: Paul I’m not sure why you would think jewelry (not stolen jewelry – you’re supplying that modifier) and some marijuana residue would be relevant to the juror’s inquiry. 

    Tommy – that information may not be admissible as evidence in the courtroom…

    That was Paul’s complaint.  He wanted it to be admissible, even though Tray has not one arrest on his record ever.

    I’m curious if Paul is equally upset that Zimmerman’s many legal transgressions were not put before the jury.

    It’s a test of his fairness.

    I hope he answers.

    • #30

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