Colin Powell: Zimmerman Verdict “Questionable”

 

 Appearing on CBS’s Face the Nation yesterday, the former Secretary of State and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff weighed in—with his customary ham-handedness—on the George Zimmerman not-guilty verdict. As reported in the Los Angeles Times:

“I think that [the verdict] will be seen as a questionable judgment on the part of the judicial system down there, but I don’t know if it will have staying power,” Powell said. “These cases come along and they blaze across the midnight sky and then … they’re forgotten.”

The only questionable judgment in the legal case against George Zimmerman was that displayed by the state of Florida in pursuing it in the first place. They had no case, and anyone with a shred of sense knew it. The jury delivered the proper verdict in rejecting the prosecution’s overwrought characterizations of the defendant.

And as for that bit about blazing across the midnight sky before being forgotten … that sounds rather like Colin Powell.

There are 27 comments.

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  1. Profile Photo Inactive
    @CommodoreBTC

    That answer is classic Powell, utterly noncommittal, but a sop to conventional wisdom among liberal elites.

    • #1
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    @KCMulville

    I’m not sure I even know what it means. What “staying power?” Unless he’s saying that the Zimmerman case was a temporary comment on the culture, and that the verdict didn’t change anyone’s mind about race relations. But if so, then more’s the pity – the Zimmerman case was a useful lesson about what happens when reverse discrimination goes political. It showed why trying to distort the facts to exploit a racial narrative leaves everyone resentful. 

    • #2
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    @EugeneKriegsmann

    Many of us have thought of Powell as a turncoat since his retreat from the Bush administration. I think that what has happened is that Powell is simply pursuing his natural constituency, the Black vote, or, at least, approval of Blacks and, by association, Liberals. We so much wanted a Black conservative that we projected conservatism on him. He has, likely, always been a Liberal and a political general with as much integrity as one can expect from anyone who has risen in an army rife with politics and political correctness.

    • #3
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    @BrentB67

    Colin Powell would do well to sit down and take a long look at John McCain. A brave military officer and leader that tried his hands at politics and failed.

    Unfortunately for Messer’s McCain and Powell we tend to be remembered by our last great acts. McCain will be remembered as a liberal Senator living off his legacy and cuddling up to democrats and reporters at every opportunity. Colin Powell will be remembered similar to McCain with a dash or racism thrown in thanks to these inspired comments about the Zimmer trial.

    • #4
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    @Foxman

    Isn’t Mr Powell a “House Negro”?  When did he get rehabilitated?

    • #5
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    @Wolfsheim

    Powell was on record as pro-abortion and pro-reverse-discrimination…So what’s so surprising here?

    • #6
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    @JMaestro
    Butters: That answer is classic Powell, utterly noncommittal, but a sop to conventional wisdom among liberal elites. · 47 minutes ago

    I think you’ve summed up Powell quite neatly: just another lead-from-behind politician.

    Powell is in it for Powell, and he’s not going to risk any of his polite-society fame to confront difficult questions honestly.

    Just the opposite: conventional politicians need racial division. For the same reason the Oberlins, Dukes and Columbias need it.

    • #7
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    @MarkMonaghan

    Yes forgotten – kinda like Powell’s generalship. 

    • #8
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    @JamesGawron

    Jack,

    A long time ago I thought it would be great if Colin Powell would run for President as a Republican.  Gd said no.

    Gd was right.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #9
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    @Pelayo

    I have officially lost any shred of respect I still had for Colin Powell.  I once came across a “Leadership Primer” from Colin Powell that contained 20 lessons for leaders.  Lesson 3 was “Don’t be buffaloed by experts and elites.  Experts often possess more data than judgment.  Elites can become so inbred that they produce hemophiliacs who bleed to death as soon as they are nicked by the real world.”  Powell has officially joined the “Elites” and has lost touch with the real world where people like Zimmerman have a right to defend themselves when being beat up by someone like Trayvon Martin.  The only questionable thing about the Zimmerman trial is the fact that the State Attorney tried to convict him at all.  Florida law is written with a bias towards allowing deadly force in self-defense and anyone who does not like it should move to Chicago or Oakland.

    • #10
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    @Sisyphus

    The remarkableness of the Zimmerman case is how Zimmerman’s civil rights have been shredded by an irresponsible president, a scofflaw US Attorney General, the usual run of hack race mongers like Al Sharpton and Chris Matthews, and now, of course, the first black Secretary of State. History will remember them all very unkindly.

    • #11
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    @FredCole
    Butters: That answer is classic Powell, utterly noncommittal, but a sop to conventional wisdom among liberal elites. · 3 hours ago

    There’s really nothing more to say than that.

    • #12
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    @Devereaux

    I never did like Colin Powell. But then, I never liked Bush 41 either.

    Perhaps it’s time to stop talking about either of them. At least 41 has been gracious in his retirement.

    • #13
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    @ScarletPimpernel
    Read him closely. He was being slippery. Powell did not say whether he agreed with the judgment. The well placed use of the passive voice “will be seen as a questionable judgment” allows him not to say what his personal opinion is.
    • #14
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    @LeslieWatkins

    I’m guessing he’s hoping for a role as vp on the democratic ticket.

    • #15
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    @Guruforhire

    Holy passive voice batman.

    Every single part of that sentence is true.

    It will be seen as a poor judgement….. By everybody…… and in a few years nobody will care………

    We learn absolutely nothing from that sentence about what Colin Powell thinks about the verdict.

    • #16
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    @Devereaux
    Guruforhire: Holy passive voice batman.

    Every single part of that sentence is true.

    It will be seen as a poor judgement….. By everybody…… and in a few years nobody will care………

    We learn absolutely nothing from that sentence about what Colin Powell thinks about the verdict. · 1 minute ago

    But we learn a LOT about Colin Powell.

    • #17
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    @Ralphie

    I’m beginning to wonder if Colin Powell is an expert in anything except maybe himself.  He wanders off into areas he doesn’t seem to be well versed in commnenting on, similar to the president, whom he seems to adore.  They say the way to improve your golf game is to play with better golfers. Powell needs to join a new league.

    • #18
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    @MiffedWhiteMale

    On the Zimmerman case, there’s an irony in the Christopher Lane case (The Australian killed in OK by three black teens who were “bored”).  This case is almost exactly what the Trayvon defenders CLAIMED the Zimmerman case was – an innocent victim picked out, hunted down and shot in cold blood on the basis of his race.

    So where are the Sharptons and the Jacksons and the rallies and the “If I had a son he’d look like…” press conferences?

    • #19
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    @dittoheadadt
    BrentB67: Colin Powell would do well to sit down and take a long look at John McCain.

    Colin Powell would do well to sit down and take a long look in the mirror.

    Considering all that he has accomplished in life can he really be as thickheaded, as obtuse, as feeble-of-mind as his comments strongly suggest?

    • #20
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    @dittoheadadt
    Sisyphus: The remarkableness of the Zimmerman case is how Zimmerman’s civil rights have been shredded by an irresponsible president, a scofflaw US Attorney General, the usual run of hack race mongers like Al Sharpton and Chris Matthews, and now, of course, the first black Secretary of State.

    The remarkableness is that despite all of that, justice still prevailed.

    • #21
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    @dittoheadadt
    Guruforhire: Holy passive voice batman.

    Every single part of that sentence is true.

    It will be seen as a poor judgement….. By everybody…… and in a few years nobody will care………

    We learn absolutely nothing from that sentence about what Colin Powell thinks about the verdict.

    But we learn a great deal about what Colin Powell thinks about taking principled stands that run contrary to his natural constituency, and thus, we learn how principled he is not.

    • #22
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    @PaulARahe

    I have never thought highly of Colin Powell. He was an all-too-political general and a lazy, feckless Secretary of State. Now he is nothing more than an embarrassment.

    • #23
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    @NickStuart

    Powell became a 2-star then 3-start general under Reagan, 4-star and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs under Bush I, Secretary of State under Bush II.

    Naturally in 2008 and 2012 he endorsed Barack Obama.

    According to Dante, the lowest level, of the lowest circle of Hell is the abode of traitors to benefactors. There’s a hole in the ice there with Colin Powell’s name on it.

    • #24
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    @JanMichaelRives

    This is what happens when you go work at the State Department for any length of time. Heck, look at what happened to Condi! I tell you, nothing good comes out of that place.

    • #25
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    @LanceRobinson

    Well said.

    • #26
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    @Sisyphus
    dittoheadadt

    Sisyphus: The remarkableness of the Zimmerman case is how Zimmerman’s civil rights have been shredded by an irresponsible president, a scofflaw US Attorney General, the usual run of hack race mongers like Al Sharpton and Chris Matthews, and now, of course, the first black Secretary of State.

    The remarkableness is that despite all of that, justice still prevailed. · 1 hour ago

    A jury can be an awesome thing. 

    • #27

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