The “Long Transition” Is Close To Reality

 

Since last June when I posted Close Your Eyes and Think of AmericaI have been arguing for Republicans to treat the 2024 Trump presidential campaign as an “incumbency” campaign. I have argued to unify around President Trump as the avatar of restoration of constitutional order, not as the man himself, flawed as he is. I argued for this because of the need to spend the maximum time possible both assuring the Democrats’ defeat in November 2024, and preparing for the work of a new administration that will be more arduous and difficult than ever before. Even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.

Happily, today as we enter Super Tuesday, it appears that Republican voters are doing exactly that. When the votes are tallied tonight, President Trump should have if not more than 1,000 delegates pledged, nearly 1,000 delegates pledged. Steve Kornacki, Ben Kamisar and Adam Noboa have penned an article for NBC News (of all things) that analyze the best and worse outcomes for President Trump and Governor Haley for tonight and the March primaries over the next two weeks.  The conclusion: This is over on or before March 19. And then the “long transition” begins between the Biden and Trump II administrations.

You say I am too quick in my prediction of victory? No, I am not predicting victory. What I am calling for is the Trump campaign to stand up the transition team now and develop the plans in the event of victory. There were far too many failures of personnel in the Trump I administration. The people and plans need to be identified.

You say, won’t the voters be offended if Trump is seen as starting a transition? No, I am predicting that voters will see Trump doing so as a sign of hope. And hope is what we really need against the fascist dictates of Biden and the coming turmoil his policies are bringing.

Remember Peter Strok’s “insurance policy”? We need a new insurance policy — a fully-fleshed plan to which Republicans are committed and will execute if they retake the White House. We need that because Trump is an avatar of a movement that must not fall apart if or when Trump, the man, is removed from the equation. With Trump now ascendant his leadership can energize this process. The progressives need to be made to understand that there is no decapitation strategy against this. The level of demonization they have hurled at Trump and his supporters makes violence if not inevitable, at least highly probable. The only defense is a plan that enough people are committed to that no single event can unravel it.

And the time to start that plan is now.

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  1. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    I’m with you 100%. 

    • #1
  2. OldPhil Coolidge
    OldPhil
    @OldPhil

    Just voted for Trump in the Virginia primary.

    Hovered the pen over DeSantis’ name for a second but decided not to fill in his block.

    • #2
  3. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Just hoping it works.  But it’s likely that the Dims have not yet begun to cheat.

    • #3
  4. GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms Reagan
    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms
    @GLDIII

    It should be like the “Contract with America” in 1994, this time with more detailed basis (something explaining all faults of the left’s anti-civilizational programs, and why they needed to be adjudicated with laws) , and perhaps a more rigorous timetable. 

    It was a roaring success, a way to measure success, and eventually a report card…

    • #4
  5. EODmom Coolidge
    EODmom
    @EODmom

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    I’m with you 100%.

    Absolutely. I thought in 2016 that he should have presented a group of seasoned powerhouse brains who he would immediately nominate for State, Treasury, Defense, AG, HHS for immigration purposes. (All other cabinet slots are open to elimination in my dream cabinet.) And send them forth to present to voters policies that would make a difference in their lives. If there are not such people who want to make a difference for the country as real statesmen then there’s trouble ahead. 

    • #5
  6. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    EODmom (View Comment):

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    I’m with you 100%.

    Absolutely. I thought in 2016 that he should have presented a group of seasoned powerhouse brains who he would immediately nominate for State, Treasury, Defense, AG, HHS for immigration purposes. (All other cabinet slots are open to elimination in my dream cabinet.) And send them forth to present to voters policies that would make a difference in their lives. If there are not such people who want to make a difference for the country as real statesmen then there’s trouble ahead.

    There are definitely people who could, but one question is whether they want to put a target on their backs.

    • #6
  7. MWD B612 "Dawg" Member
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    Great idea, and should be done no matter what. It does smack of the “Shadow Cabinet” in a Westminster system, but it also gives the voters an expectation of the personnel and policy (but I repeat myself) the candidate  will implement.

    • #7
  8. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    Trump knows a lot more in 2024 than he did in 2016 in terms of both specific candidates for important appointments and the specific issues, and the issues go way beyond anything he had on his mind in 2016.

    • #8
  9. GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms Reagan
    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms
    @GLDIII

    MWD B612 "Dawg" (View Comment):

    Great idea, and should be done no matter what. It does smack of the “Shadow Cabinet” in a Westminster system, but it also gives the voters an expectation of the personnel and policy (but I repeat myself) the candidate will implement.

    The director of personnel from Reagan’s administration coined the term “Personnel is Policy”. We sort of forgotten that Trump’s trump card in 2016 was his promise to replace Scalia with a someone of the jurisprudence of the Federalist Society. It worked then. It should be overwhelming this time around since he can sincerely state he kept more of his campaign promises than the last quarter century of prior presidents.

    • #9
  10. MWD B612 "Dawg" Member
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Ma… (View Comment):
    The director of personnel from Reagan’s administration coined the term “Personnel is Policy”.

    Yeah, my “but I repeat myself” was an allusion to that. I knew someone here would pick up on it, and I was not disappointed.

    • #10
  11. DrewInLowerOrderAutonomousZone Member
    DrewInLowerOrderAutonomousZone
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Rodin: We need a new insurance policy — a fully fleshed plan to which Republicans are committed and will execute if they retake the White House. We need that because Trump is an avatar of a movement that must not fall apart if or when Trump, the man, is removed from the equation. With Trump now ascendant his leadership can energize this process.

    The GOP needs to understand that getting rid of Trump does not get rid of MAGA. The movement existed before him (under other names) and will continue after him. No more going back to business as usual. The sooner the GOP understands this the sooner they’ll reform — or die.

    • #11
  12. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    • #12
  13. OldPhil Coolidge
    OldPhil
    @OldPhil

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate.

    My Mom always told us that during those years her Dad would play pool and win the money that fed his family of 8 kids. Lucky for them he was a hustler.

    • #13
  14. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    Rodin: You say I am too quick in my prediction of victory? No, I am not predicting victory. What I am calling for is the Trump campaign to stand up the transition team now and develop the plans in the event of victory. There were far too many failures of personnel in the Trump I administration. The people and plans need to be identified. 

    I haven’t visited the site yet, and I can’t get to it at work, but I remember hearing about a group preparing for a second term, Project 2025. Don’t know if they are officially tied to the Trump team, but sounds as though someone is thinking along the lines you are.

    • #14
  15. GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms Reagan
    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Malpropisms
    @GLDIII

    DrewInLowerOrderAutonomousZone (View Comment):

    Rodin: We need a new insurance policy — a fully fleshed plan to which Republicans are committed and will execute if they retake the White House. We need that because Trump is an avatar of a movement that must not fall apart if or when Trump, the man, is removed from the equation. With Trump now ascendant his leadership can energize this process.

    The GOP needs to understand that getting rid of Trump does not get rid of MAGA. The movement existed before him (under other names) and will continue after him. No more going back to business as usual. The sooner the GOP understands this the sooner they’ll reform — or die.

    cough*Tea Party*cough

    • #15
  16. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    That’s a fair comment. And I thought about that claim before I wrote it. My impression is that bad as the economic times were (and I have no desire to diminish them) there was more fundamental strength in the institutions then that progressives have now undermined. And so it is that IMO we are on the verge of collapse if progressives continue in power (and possibly even if they don’t). And the collapse is not just us but with key partners in the West. It can come about in numerous ways, and the one way out that I can see is reclaiming fundamental values that I actually believe were more robust in the 1930s than they are today.

    • #16
  17. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    GLDIII Purveyor of Splendid Ma… (View Comment):

    DrewInLowerOrderAutonomousZone (View Comment):

    Rodin: We need a new insurance policy — a fully fleshed plan to which Republicans are committed and will execute if they retake the White House. We need that because Trump is an avatar of a movement that must not fall apart if or when Trump, the man, is removed from the equation. With Trump now ascendant his leadership can energize this process.

    The GOP needs to understand that getting rid of Trump does not get rid of MAGA. The movement existed before him (under other names) and will continue after him. No more going back to business as usual. The sooner the GOP understands this the sooner they’ll reform — or die.

    cough*Tea Party*cough

    Yes. 

    • #17
  18. CACrabtree Coolidge
    CACrabtree
    @CACrabtree

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Just hoping it works. But it’s likely that the Dims have not yet begun to cheat.

    Well, Garland and the DOJ are going to do their part.  In a speech last Sunday, Garland said that DOJ was “…challenging efforts by states and jurisdictions to implement discriminatory, burdensome and unnecessary restrictions on access to the ballot, including those related to mail-in voting, the use of drop boxes and voter ID requirements…

    In other words, the means that the Dims have been using to cheat in the past two elections.

    • #18
  19. Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist Coolidge
    Globalitarian Lower Order Misanthropist
    @Flicker

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    Rodin: You say I am too quick in my prediction of victory? No, I am not predicting victory. What I am calling for is the Trump campaign to stand up the transition team now and develop the plans in the event of victory. There were far too many failures of personnel in the Trump I administration. The people and plans need to be identified.

    I haven’t visited the site yet, and I can’t get to it at work, but I remember hearing about a group preparing for a second term, Project 2025. Don’t know if they are officially tied to the Trump team, but sounds as though someone is thinking along the lines you are.

    The Heritage Foundation, huh?

    Added: Larry Arnn is on the Board of Trustees.

    • #19
  20. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Just hoping it works. But it’s likely that the Dims have not yet begun to cheat.

    They’ve never just begun.

    Sung by the Carpenters.

    • #20
  21. Douglas Pratt Coolidge
    Douglas Pratt
    @DouglasPratt

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    I’m with you 100%.

    Me too. Organize now. If we can beat the fraud machine and get elected, that’s just the beginning. This is our last chance to live in a republic. 

    • #21
  22. EODmom Coolidge
    EODmom
    @EODmom

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    That’s a fair comment. And I thought about that claim before I wrote it. My impression is that bad as the economic times were (and I have no desire to diminish them) there was more fundamental strength in the institutions then that progressives have now undermined. And so it is that IMO we are on the verge of collapse if progressives continue in power (and possibly even if they don’t). And the collapse is not just us but with key partners in the West. It can come about in numerous ways, and the one way out that I can see is reclaiming fundamental values that I actually believe were more robust in the 1930s than they are today.

    I agree – and will go so far as to say it’s time to drop the polite “progressive” designation.  The current day progressives are radicals. What the decision-makers in the Democrat party (and their allies globally) want is wholesale dismantling of the democratic governance  of the most significant powers in the world. Concomitant is the elimination of organic capitalism and the protection of property and human rights.
    I don’t believe those decision-makers want the general improvement of life for all that they have historically promised as the result of “progressive” policies. I believe they seek to return to a quite medieval serf/master relationship. Education by government has already been oriented toward “workforce” skill proficiency, not knowledge mastery. The wholesale importation of uneducated and unskilled males will only supply manual labor, not meet any skilled needs. They for sure won’t create anything new. No one asks where the many women also being imported end up. 
    The decision-makers are very serious about remaking western civilization, but without the essential elements of freedom and independence. 

    • #22
  23. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    EODmom (View Comment):

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    That’s a fair comment. And I thought about that claim before I wrote it. My impression is that bad as the economic times were (and I have no desire to diminish them) there was more fundamental strength in the institutions then that progressives have now undermined. And so it is that IMO we are on the verge of collapse if progressives continue in power (and possibly even if they don’t). And the collapse is not just us but with key partners in the West. It can come about in numerous ways, and the one way out that I can see is reclaiming fundamental values that I actually believe were more robust in the 1930s than they are today.

    I agree – and will go so far as to say it’s time to drop the polite “progressive” designation. The current day progressives are radicals. What the decision-makers in the Democrat party (and their allies globally) want is wholesale dismantling of the democratic governance of the most significant powers in the world. Concomitant is the elimination of organic capitalism and the protection of property and human rights.
    I don’t believe those decision-makers want the general improvement of life for all that they have historically promised as the result of “progressive” policies. I believe they seek to return to a quite medieval serf/master relationship. Education by government has already been oriented toward “workforce” skill proficiency, not knowledge mastery. The wholesale importation of uneducated and unskilled males will only supply manual labor, not meet any skilled needs. They for sure won’t create anything new. No one asks where the many women also being imported end up.
    The decision-makers are very serious about remaking western civilization, but without the essential elements of freedom and independence.

    I am happy with calling so-called progressives (actually regressive) radical instead. I routinely use “progressive” because of what they have done to the word “liberal”. I identify as a “classical liberal” because of what I understood it to mean at the time of the Founding in this country. At as it shares the same root with “liberty”, I am quite fond of it and wish it hadn’t been perverted by radicals. I think most people (YMMV) who identify today with conservatism would not find being called “liberal” in 1800 amiss.

    • #23
  24. Franco Member
    Franco
    @Franco

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    Apparently, you believe that poverty is a single issue that somehow the government can solve or improve. I don’t believe  you have your ‘thinking caps’ on (and those who liked this comment). Technology and efficient distribution (also tech-based) is the reason people are not starving in developed countries.

    Can’t this argument be used for almost EVERY country on the planet? This would include China, Russia and various blips on the economic spectrum of taking the ‘depression era’ Germany (Weimar) through the transition to you-know-what as a ‘positive’ and of course making the ‘trains run on time’ is also helpful for the economy of a nation. Nothing to worry about Herr Schmidt, here in 1938 we have it so much better! 

    Further, for FDR to have inherited more problems  by comparing today’s economy and how people don’t have to ‘gather kernels of corn on the train tracks’ , implies that government policies and central planning by politicians could, or even did, bring the country out of depression is ludicrous at least for a free-market conservative which I have to guess these people are not.

    It is widely considered by economists that WWII was the catalyst for getting the USA  out of the depression (the rest of the industrialized world was in chaos and rubble), and the fact that the only industrial base left standing among developed nations was the USA, which propelled this country into the dominant position we enjoyed for many decades thereafter.

    This is a site that focuses on politics, and this is a thoughtful post about the daunting task that awaits. To read this economically and historically vacuous quibble coming from one of the site’s moderators, a position that essentially says, Oh nothing to worry about here, we don’t have to gather corn by the railroad tracks anymore does not inspire.

    NOTE: Deleted my inquiry as to why this isn’t on the main feed is deleted.

    • #24
  25. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Reports this morning are that Haley will announce her campaign suspension at 10am EST. Trump delegate count is such after Super Tuesday that he will almost assuredly have the majority of pledged delegates after next week’s primaries in Georgia, Missouri, Mississippi, Idaho, Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

    • #25
  26. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Rodin (View Comment):
    I agree – and will go so far as to say it’s time to drop the polite “progressive” designation.  The current day progressives are radicals

    I’ll stick with progressive where the description fits. I’m radical–a radical incrementalist, among other things. I was radicalized against the welfare state at about age 10. There is nothing inherently wrong with being radical. There is a lot wrong with political progressivism.

    • #26
  27. OldPhil Coolidge
    OldPhil
    @OldPhil

    Rodin (View Comment):

    EODmom (View Comment):

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    That’s a fair comment. And I thought about that claim before I wrote it. My impression is that bad as the economic times were (and I have no desire to diminish them) there was more fundamental strength in the institutions then that progressives have now undermined. And so it is that IMO we are on the verge of collapse if progressives continue in power (and possibly even if they don’t). And the collapse is not just us but with key partners in the West. It can come about in numerous ways, and the one way out that I can see is reclaiming fundamental values that I actually believe were more robust in the 1930s than they are today.

    I agree – and will go so far as to say it’s time to drop the polite “progressive” designation. The current day progressives are radicals. What the decision-makers in the Democrat party (and their allies globally) want is wholesale dismantling of the democratic governance of the most significant powers in the world. Concomitant is the elimination of organic capitalism and the protection of property and human rights.
    I don’t believe those decision-makers want the general improvement of life for all that they have historically promised as the result of “progressive” policies. I believe they seek to return to a quite medieval serf/master relationship. Education by government has already been oriented toward “workforce” skill proficiency, not knowledge mastery. The wholesale importation of uneducated and unskilled males will only supply manual labor, not meet any skilled needs. They for sure won’t create anything new. No one asks where the many women also being imported end up.
    The decision-makers are very serious about remaking western civilization, but without the essential elements of freedom and independence.

    I am happy with calling so-called progressives (actually regressive) radical instead. I routinely use “progressive” because of what they have done to the word “liberal”. I identify as a “classical liberal” because of what I understood it to mean at the time of the Founding in this country. At as it shares the same root with “liberty”, I am quite fond of it and wish it hadn’t been perverted by radicals. I think most people (YMMV) who identify today with conservatism would not find being called “liberal” in 1800 amiss.

    Per Chris Plante, “They’re not liberals, they’re the left.” He uses that line at least a dozen times every morning.

    • #27
  28. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    EODmom (View Comment):

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    That’s a fair comment. And I thought about that claim before I wrote it. My impression is that bad as the economic times were (and I have no desire to diminish them) there was more fundamental strength in the institutions then that progressives have now undermined. And so it is that IMO we are on the verge of collapse if progressives continue in power (and possibly even if they don’t). And the collapse is not just us but with key partners in the West. It can come about in numerous ways, and the one way out that I can see is reclaiming fundamental values that I actually believe were more robust in the 1930s than they are today.

    I agree – and will go so far as to say it’s time to drop the polite “progressive” designation. The current day progressives are radicals. What the decision-makers in the Democrat party (and their allies globally) want is wholesale dismantling of the democratic governance of the most significant powers in the world. Concomitant is the elimination of organic capitalism and the protection of property and human rights.
    I don’t believe those decision-makers want the general improvement of life for all that they have historically promised as the result of “progressive” policies. I believe they seek to return to a quite medieval serf/master relationship. Education by government has already been oriented toward “workforce” skill proficiency, not knowledge mastery. The wholesale importation of uneducated and unskilled males will only supply manual labor, not meet any skilled needs. They for sure won’t create anything new. No one asks where the many women also being imported end up.
    The decision-makers are very serious about remaking western civilization, but without the essential elements of freedom and independence.

    It is the end-state of the Marxist cultural revolution started by the “Frankfurt School” Marxists. When they fled Germany, most fled here, to where the progressives were already making progress. .It is hard to label them with the bad *ism that 100% applies because they have made the chocolate-vanilla swirl, the best mix that applies to what is uniquely American. These Marxists are also so dangerous because they weren’t in a hurry. Instead, they made their “slow march through the institutions,” and many did so knowing they most likely would be dead before the endgame arrived.

    Our victories were only speed bumps. As Walsh says, “They never stop, they never rest, they never sleep.” We do, and we have been mostly asleep. You can’t “fix” it because they never stop, rest, or sleep. They are like Hamas, it won’t be over until constitutional capitalists are destroyed. Look at how they continue to pursue everyone who was in DC on Jan 6. It isn’t because they abhor violence, but because they abhor us. Who have they always sided with? The side of the bad *isms Lenin, Stalin, Mussolini, Noriega, Iran, China, North Vietnamese. They tried to destroy Reagan. They worked against George W Bush at every turn. All along, they have grown in power and their arrogance has grown with them. Trump is only the latest “canary in the coal mine.” They would “perp walk” all of us at dawn if they could.

    My last act of defiance will take place on Election Day when I vote against lawfare. If voters prove unworthy of voting to save liberty, prosperity, and the Constitution, then so be it. If sheeple stand by and let the Dems jail Trump before then, I will go in during early voting, write his name in, then cruise the Caribbean election week.

    I don’t care if people accuse me of being MAGA (I own nothing with MAGA on it) or a member of a cult (I am not). I am a patriot. I know he is imperfect but I also know what the other side is and I have always wanted a fighter. He is the best fighter we have. We haven’t seen his like since the Declaration of Independence was signed. Rush loved reading his grandfather’s speech about what happened to the signers after that act of defiance. Spoiler alert, many lost everything, some were killed, some never saw their families again-British got to them first. They accepted the fight. So has Trump. “Make America Great Again” is our “Don’t Tread on Me.” (bragging rights: Christopher Gadsden was from SC)

    • #28
  29. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Reports this morning are that Haley will announce her campaign suspension at 10am EST. Trump delegate count is such after Super Tuesday that he will almost assuredly have the majority of pledged delegates after next week’s primaries in Georgia, Missouri, Mississippi, Idaho, Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

    Notice “suspension.”

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  30. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Franco (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Although I agree with you that it’s probably a good idea to start thinking ahead and forming a transition team to be in place in the case of victory, I can’t go along with your sentiment that “even Franklin Roosevelt did not enter office with as great a disaster on his hands as that which Donald J Trump will face.” My parents grew up during the Great Depression – I think they’d disagree with you. Who comes most forcefully to mind is an older woman I knew at our previous parish. She grew up, like my parents, during the Great Depression, and her parents sent her and her siblings out to walk the railroad tracks around St. Paul so they could gather kernels of corn that had fallen off the trains. That was what they ate. We simply don’t have crushing poverty like that now. We might have other problems, but nothing as basic and fundamental as large segments of the population unsure of the next meal for their families.

    Apparently, you believe that poverty is a single issue that somehow the government can solve or improve.

    I didn’t write that, because I don’t think that. Nor, for that matter, do I believe that the corruption of institutions that the post author mentions in response to my comment can be fixed by government either.

    Should I even bother reading the rest of your comment since you got that wrong in your first sentence?

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