The Game Camera Game…

 

When I lived up on the mountain in East Tennessee, I used to enjoy mounting a game camera at various places on my property, and seeing what wandered by.  I lived on 56 acres, surrounded by National Forest, and my driveway was over a mile long, mostly straight up.  So the wildlife used the driveway as a sort of interstate – easy to get lots of good pictures:

M2E56L200-200R408B316

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You’ll notice that these pictures are taken at lots of different locations.  I was moving the camera around a lot.  You might think that would be because I was afraid the wildlife would find the camera.  You would be wrong.

My kids grew up wandering all over the mountains, looking for stuff to get into.  And once they found my game camera, I would start getting lots and lots of pictures like this:

M2E57L201-201R408B317

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So I’d get 2 pictures of bobcats, and 50 pictures of goofballs goofing off.

So I’d move the camera.

And the search would be on – they were relentless.

It seems juvenile.  But we had a great time, trying to outsmart one another.  We could have been doing something productive.  But no, we were playing hide and go seek all over the mountainsides.

BearFotos (Shutterstock. Photo ID: 1913595454)

A bit silly, perhaps.  But it beats video games, right?

We had a great time.

I wish more kids could have more time to just wander around the woods.  Throwing rocks at trees.  Catching crawdads in the stream.  Trying to annoy their Dad by messing with his game camera.

Most of our kids today grow up in a virtual world.  Keeps them occupied, I guess.  And they’re not annoying their Dad as much, I suppose.  But geez.

We’re only just now beginning to understand how that turns out…

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  1. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Sounds like a great game! And not at all juvenile in my book. Spending time and energy trying to annoy Dad by finding and messing with his trail camera is time and energy not spent on the many destructive ways teens and pre-teens often find to annoy Dad. Annoying Dad is inherent in the teen role. And it looks like besides just trying to find the camera, they were creating roles to play in front of the camera.

    • #1
  2. Chuck Coolidge
    Chuck
    @Chuckles

    Dr. Bastiat: Catching crawdads crawfish in the stream.

    You’re welcome.

    • #2
  3. Doug Watt Member
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    Game camera footage from Arizona. There are approximately three to four Jaguars in the mountains south of Tucson.

    • #3
  4. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Chuck (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat: Catching crawdads crawfish in the stream.

    You’re welcome.

    You, apparently, are not fluent in Appalachian…

    • #4
  5. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    Chuck (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat: Catching crawdads crawfish in the stream.

    You’re welcome.

    We called them crawdads in the South. Used to wade in streams trying to catch them. Then we turned them loose for the next time.

    • #5
  6. Red Herring Coolidge
    Red Herring
    @EHerring

    I’m thinking of getting a game camera. I just need to do some research.

    • #6
  7. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Dr. Bastiat:

    Your bears (assuming that is a bear) sure have a body shape different from the black bears where our kids live in New Mexico. Theirs are much stockier and rounder. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a bear with a body that elongated and with such long legs. 

    • #7
  8. Fractad Coolidge
    Fractad
    @TWert

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat:

    Your bears (assuming that is a bear) sure have a body shape different from the black bears where our kids live in New Mexico. Theirs are much stockier and rounder. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a bear with a body that elongated and with such long legs.

    Maybe it’s one of his kids in a bear suit. :)

    • #8
  9. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat:

    Your bears (assuming that is a bear) sure have a body shape different from the black bears where our kids live in New Mexico. Theirs are much stockier and rounder. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a bear with a body that elongated and with such long legs.

    This bear is an adolescent.  The cubs are short and stocky, and the adults get big and beefy, like in the second black and white picture above.  Also, after the momma bear weans them and runs them off, they often struggle to find food on their own, as I understand it.  It’s not easy out there.

    Just like with people, whenever a bear does something really stupid (like falls into somebody’s hot tub or something) it’s generally an adolescent.

    • #9
  10. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    • #10
  11. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Down 200 miles southwest of here, every so often a trail cam catches a visitor.

    • #11
  12. Chuck Coolidge
    Chuck
    @Chuckles

    trail cam shot:

     

     

     

     

     

     

    But this is my favorite:

    • #12
  13. Locke On Member
    Locke On
    @LockeOn

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Chuck (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat: Catching crawdads crawfish in the stream.

    You’re welcome.

    You, apparently, are not fluent in Appalachian…

    Not just there. I grew up a Hoosier: Crawdads, miserable bait stealing creatures that they are.

    • #13
  14. Blondie Thatcher
    Blondie
    @Blondie

    Doc, I love your girls. Doing things we did growing up on the farm. We have a couple of boys in our neighborhood who spend a lot of time outdoors. It’s always a curiosity to see what they’ve built in the yard when we take our walks. Need I say, they are homeschooled. 

    The best thing I’ve caught on my game cam was video of a buck and a doe going at it in the corner of the yard. I’ve had a six pointer and an eight pointer on it this year. 

    • #14
  15. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    I love this post.

    • #15
  16. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Dr. Bastiat:

    I wish more kids could have more time to just wander around the woods.  Throwing rocks at trees.  Catching crawdads in the stream.  Trying to annoy their Dad by messing with his game camera.

    Most of our kids today grow up in a virtual world.  Keeps them occupied, I guess.  And they’re not annoying their Dad as much, I suppose.  But geez.

    As someone who grew up in a parsonage with 40 acres and a creek running through the place, as well as a small barn and outbuildings from the days when the pastor kept a few animals, I was sometimes disappointed that my kids didn’t make much use of the 7.5 acres where we’ve lived the past 45 years.  

    I also wondered what happened to one of the two, long tie-down straps that I used in the late 60s and 70s to tie my homemade canvas-hulled canoe down to the carrier on top of my car.  Or rather, to tie both canoe and carrier down.  The one I had was sometimes useful for towing bundles of brush out back, and stuff like that, but where was the other?  

    Then one day, maybe ten years ago (not long after I retired) I was out in the little woods behind our place, looking around to see what cherry trees needed to be thinned out, and saw the strap up high in a tree, where it had been used to lash a wooden structure to the tree.  The wood had since rotted almost completely away, but the strap was still there.

    I laughed and felt better knowing that at least one of the boys (and I had a pretty good guess which one) had made more use of our outdoors than I had known about.  

    • #16
  17. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    I love looking at families dining in restaurants. There is zero conversation. Every person at the table has their full focus on the smartphone in their hand. You did well Doc, starting with your choice of residence!

    • #17
  18. OmegaPaladin Moderator
    OmegaPaladin
    @OmegaPaladin

    I am a geek, and I like computer games.  However, I really liked bike riding and exploring out in the country as a kid.   Also, launching model rockets with my dad.   

    • #18
  19. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    I placed a deer carcass in front of my trail cam to see who shows up. The eagles and crows kept everything away until it was gone. Too bad I can’t upload the video. I hope the new site lets us do it. This bird was tagged with a colored bracelet on each leg.

    I have a camo Bushnell trail cam. (not this one) The camoflauge is so good I lost it. Two years later and I keep scanning trees.

    • #19
  20. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    I placed a deer carcass in front of my trail cam to see who shows up. The eagles and crows kept everything away until it was gone. Too bad I can’t upload the video. I hope the new site lets us do it. This bird was tagged with a colored bracelet on each leg.

    I have a camo Bushnell trail cam. (not this one) The camoflauge is so good I lost it. Two years later and I keep scanning trees.

    People steal those things, too.  It might have walked off…

    • #20
  21. Randy Weivoda Moderator
    Randy Weivoda
    @RandyWeivoda

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    I placed a deer carcass in front of my trail cam to see who shows up. The eagles and crows kept everything away until it was gone. Too bad I can’t upload the video. I hope the new site lets us do it. This bird was tagged with a colored bracelet on each leg.

    I have a camo Bushnell trail cam. (not this one) The camoflauge is so good I lost it. Two years later and I keep scanning trees.

    Do you have a Google account?  If you do, you already have a Youtube account, as they are owned by Google.  You can upload the video to Youtube, then post the link in a comment or post on Ricochet.

    • #21
  22. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    I placed a deer carcass in front of my trail cam to see who shows up. The eagles and crows kept everything away until it was gone. Too bad I can’t upload the video. I hope the new site lets us do it. This bird was tagged with a colored bracelet on each leg.

    I have a camo Bushnell trail cam. (not this one) The camoflauge is so good I lost it. Two years later and I keep scanning trees.

    Do you have a Google account? If you do, you already have a Youtube account, as they are owned by Google. You can upload the video to Youtube, then post the link in a comment or post on Ricochet.

    Wow thanks for the info. I’m busy vacationing right now but I’ll post it later today or early tomorrow.

    This is a juvenile Bald Eagle. They don’t get the white head until they are about 3yo. We have a lot of them. On windy days they love to play. They dive-bomb and do loops.

    • #22
  23. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    I placed a deer carcass in front of my trail cam to see who shows up. The eagles and crows kept everything away until it was gone. Too bad I can’t upload the video. I hope the new site lets us do it. This bird was tagged with a colored bracelet on each leg.

    I have a camo Bushnell trail cam. (not this one) The camoflauge is so good I lost it. Two years later and I keep scanning trees.

    For now all you can do is put a video on YouTube – it can be “private” if you like, so only people with the direct url can see it – and then link it here.

    (Making it “private” may also keep it from “embedding” here but at least people could see it on YouTube.com with the url.)

    • #23
  24. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Chuck (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat: Catching crawdads crawfish in the stream.

    You’re welcome.

    Nope. They’re crawdads down south.

    • #24
  25. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat:

    Your bears (assuming that is a bear) sure have a body shape different from the black bears where our kids live in New Mexico. Theirs are much stockier and rounder. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a bear with a body that elongated and with such long legs.

    It’s a cub; probably less than a year old.

    • #25
  26. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Jim McConnell (View Comment):

    Chuck (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat: Catching crawdads crawfish in the stream.

    You’re welcome.

    Nope. They’re crawdads down south.

    I was recently watching some videos of the Bike Ride Across Nebraska, including the Cowboy Trail, which runs from Valentine to Norfolk, and I realized that even though I spent my formative years from ages 8-15 in northeastern Nebraska, and it was the favoritist place I ever lived, I never really became a Nebraskan. Nebraskans pronounce Norfolk as Norfork, not Norfolk, and nobody in my family ever made that adjustment, even though my parents made a once-a-month trip to Norfolk to do shopping and sometimes dragged us kids along. People do know what you mean when you say Norfolk, but that’s not the way most of them say it.  Neither my parents nor any of my siblings ever said Norfork in my hearing.  While living there I learned to pronounce creek as crick in spite of my father’s corrections, but not to pronounce Norfolk as Norfork.

    • #26
  27. She Member
    She
    @She

    Wonderful post.  Excellent parenting suggestions.

    I picked up a little trail camera several years ago to see if I could get a shot of what I thought must be beavers wreaking havoc on the trees edging the creek at the end of my road.  I’d set it up (usually I strapped it to a tree), and every time I came to check it, something had chewed through the strap and torn it down.  I never did get a shot of the beaver with the trail cam, although I snuck up on a couple when I was on a walk one day and took these

    I had more success using it to discover who was stealing the outdoor bowl of cat food.  If it had been a cat, I was going to leave it out, but it turned out to be a raccoon, so I removed it. 

    • #27
  28. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    She (View Comment):
    I had more success using it to discover who was stealing the outdoor bowl of cat food.  If it had been a cat, I was going to leave it out, but it turned out to be a raccoon, so I removed it. 

    • #28
  29. She Member
    She
    @She

    There he is!

    • #29
  30. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Great pictures!  Loved the bobcat one – he (or she) knew where the camera was! A great reminder that each day nature goes about its business – – God provides – and  the natural world  is not stunted or halted by gender issues/changes or finding food and shelter. God provides the worms but He doesn’t throw them in the nest! 

    Love your kids’ imaginations!

    Wonder what you’d record now it you posted the cameras around…..

    • #30
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