Released, The Kraken Has Been

 

Sidney Powell once claimed she would release the Kraken; a turn of phrase widely interpreted to mean that she would produce smoking gun evidence of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Ultimately, Powell never released so much as a hermit crab, much less a Kraken, and later found herself in the crosshairs of Fani Willis’ unhinged prosecution of former President Trump.

In October, Powell chose to plead guilty in the Fani Willis RICO case designed to persecute President Trump and just about everyone in his orbit.

This week a Kraken of a different sort has been released in Georgia and it looks sure to take Fani Willis down. Perhaps it will take down the entire corrupt prosecution. If so, what happens to Sidney Powell and any others to took a plea deal? Would their pleas and subsequent convictions be overturned?

This entire ordeal is a disgusting perversion of the law. It is good to see the tables turning on a corrupt officer of the court who is obviously more interested in lawfare than justice. May the same happen to Jack Smith, Alvin Bragg, etc. 

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There are 13 comments.

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  1. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    The justice system is not working properly when those charged improperly and knowing there is no real evidence that would merit a conviction can be induced to plead guilty. Of course, we know at this time that the operators of the system are doing these improper things deliberately and , to me, that means there is really no excuse for failing to correct that.

    • #1
  2. David Carroll Thatcher
    David Carroll
    @DavidCarroll

    Unfortunately, the justice system punishes the innocent as well as the guilty, because the process is itself punishing to any accused.   I was tempted to put scare quotes around the word justice.

    • #2
  3. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    • #3
  4. Steve C. Member
    Steve C.
    @user_531302

    I expect if you plead guilty, you are stuck.

    Open to correction by actual lawyers.

    • #4
  5. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Steve C. (View Comment):

    I expect if you plead guilty, you are stuck.

    Open to correction by actual lawyers.

    I’ve thought about that too.  But what if what you plead guilty to isn’t actually a crime?

    • #5
  6. Instugator Thatcher
    Instugator
    @Instugator

    David Carroll (View Comment):
    I was tempted to put scare quotes around the word justice.

    I always refer to the DOJ as the Department of (in)Justice. 

    • #6
  7. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    Steve C. (View Comment):

    I expect if you plead guilty, you are stuck.

    Open to correction by actual lawyers.

     

    Well, if you can prove the plea was coerced maybe there is hope, but that is a really high burden, especially when it’s a lawyer saying they were coerced.  A lawyer couldn’t say that he or she didn’t know what a guilty plea means.

    • #7
  8. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Steve C. (View Comment):

    I expect if you plead guilty, you are stuck.

    Open to correction by actual lawyers.

     

    Well, if you can prove the plea was coerced maybe there is hope, but that is a really high burden, especially when it’s a lawyer saying they were coerced. A lawyer couldn’t say that he or she didn’t know what a guilty plea means.

    I’ve heard of cases – Gen. Flynn, for example – where prosecutors apparently actually said (more or less) “if you don’t admit to this we’re going after your family” etc, but how direct does “coercion” have to be?  Do they actually have to hold a gun to your head while you sign the plea deal?  Or could it be enough that they keep going and going and going with their essentially unlimited resources until you’re broke, homeless, etc?

    • #8
  9. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Steve C. (View Comment):

    I expect if you plead guilty, you are stuck.

    Open to correction by actual lawyers.

     

    Well, if you can prove the plea was coerced maybe there is hope, but that is a really high burden, especially when it’s a lawyer saying they were coerced. A lawyer couldn’t say that he or she didn’t know what a guilty plea means.

    I’ve heard of cases – Gen. Flynn, for example – where prosecutors apparently actually said (more or less) “if you don’t admit to this we’re going after your family” etc, but how direct does “coercion” have to be? Do they actually have to hold a gun to your head while you sign the plea deal? Or could it be enough that they keep going and going and going with their essentially unlimited resources until you’re broke, homeless, etc?

    One thing I learned as a lawyer is that there is law, and then there is what the judge decides.  Often the two can be consistent though wildly divergent.  Other times, it’s just whatever the judge wants it to be, and they can be very creative in justifying their decision.

    • #9
  10. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Nathanael Ferguson: Sidney Powell once claimed she would release the Kraken; a turn of phrase widely interpreted to mean that she would produce smoking gun evidence of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election.

    • #10
  11. davenr321 Coolidge
    davenr321
    @davenr321

    I believe it’s always better to be fired than to quit. Same with plea bargains. for what I think are bogus; what’s the worst that can happen? I get thrown in prison for something I never admitted to (and, presumably didn’t do)? 

    “Take the deal,” my lawyer said. 
    “But this is BS, I want to fight,” I replied. “I’m innocent of these charges.”

    “It’s going to cost too much.”

     “Not if I fire you and do it all on my own.”

     “Now wait a second, you still have a couple of million dollars that could be spent on good lawyers!”

     “Naaa… I’ll do it on my own and the press will love it, and, besides, I have a hunch that the prosecution is more corrupt than we could imagine. So I’ll wait out the siege. Go chase an ambulance or something.”

    G. Gordon Liddy, and Bill Clinton refused to die without a fight. Powell, and Ellis I don’t get. Flynn seems to have been hosed, though. 

    • #11
  12. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    davenr321 (View Comment):

    I believe it’s always better to be fired than to quit. Same with plea bargains. for what I think are bogus; what’s the worst that can happen? I get thrown in prison for something I never admitted to (and, presumably didn’t do)?

    “Take the deal,” my lawyer said.
    “But this is BS, I want to fight,” I replied. “I’m innocent of these charges.”

    “It’s going to cost too much.”

    “Not if I fire you and do it all on my own.”

    “Now wait a second, you still have a couple of million dollars that could be spent on good lawyers!”

    “Naaa… I’ll do it on my own and the press will love it, and, besides, I have a hunch that the prosecution is more corrupt than we could imagine. So I’ll wait out the siege. Go chase an ambulance or something.”

    G. Gordon Liddy, and Bill Clinton refused to die without a fight. Powell, and Ellis I don’t get. Flynn seems to have been hosed, though.

    When the extravagantly corrupt and partisan Democrat Senate leader, Harry Reid, got rid of the filibuster for judicial appointments, the purpose was to permit Pres. Obama to fill the courts with left-wing activists.

    These progressive judges simply don’t care who is guilty or innocent, or what the evidence is, or what the law says.  Their purpose is not justice, but “social justice”; i.e., advancing the progressive cause.

    We saw this in the Harvard affirmative action case.  The appeals court judge tried to fix the case by excluding some of the strongest evidence that Harvard was discriminating by race.   (Fortunately the Supreme Court didn’t fall for it.)

    • #12
  13. Steve C. Member
    Steve C.
    @user_531302

    Skyler (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Steve C. (View Comment):

    I expect if you plead guilty, you are stuck.

    Open to correction by actual lawyers.

     

    Well, if you can prove the plea was coerced maybe there is hope, but that is a really high burden, especially when it’s a lawyer saying they were coerced. A lawyer couldn’t say that he or she didn’t know what a guilty plea means.

    I’ve heard of cases – Gen. Flynn, for example – where prosecutors apparently actually said (more or less) “if you don’t admit to this we’re going after your family” etc, but how direct does “coercion” have to be? Do they actually have to hold a gun to your head while you sign the plea deal? Or could it be enough that they keep going and going and going with their essentially unlimited resources until you’re broke, homeless, etc?

    One thing I learned as a lawyer is that there is law, and then there is what the judge decides. Often the two can be consistent though wildly divergent. Other times, it’s just whatever the judge wants it to be, and they can be very creative in justifying their decision.

    This triggers a memory…

    Being forced to endure the seemingly endless hours of my wife’s devotion to the Outlander series, this bit of dialogue between the British colonial governor of North Carolina and militia LTC Jamie Frasier, when discussing how to deal with the Regulators. 

    Tryon: As I said to you when you first arrived on these shores, Mr. Fraser, there is the law…
    Jamie: And there is what is done.

     

    • #13
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