Affirmative Action Turns a Corner

 

There is an Axios article out that reports an overwhelming majority of Americans feel that the Supreme Court decision to ban race-based admissions was correct. Axios breaks support for the decision down by race. Not entirely surprisingly Blacks are the racial group that has the largest percentage believing it was a bad decision: 48%. But that means that 52% support the decision — which I think it important.

Affirmative action was a policy that was either cynical or well-meaning. But regardless, it supported the “soft bigotry of low expectations”. And this tarnished the success of any who did, or were perceived to have, receive(d) unearned preferential treatment. That 52% of Black adults understand this is very good given the group pressure in the Age of DEI to hold fast to the “victim hierarchy”. That, no doubt, accounts for 48% of Black adults saying that the ban on race-based admissions is bad. I cannot believe that all of those Black adults who say the ban is bad are blind to how Affirmative Action depreciates their own accomplishments. And I certainly don’t believe that 48% of Black adults require preferential treatment to be successful. Over time I expect that support for the Supreme Court decision will only grow. The only headwind is DEI orthodoxy and efforts to achieve race-based admissions by other means.

The less hopeful aspect of the Axios report is that fewer Asians than Hispanics or Whites see the ban as good. I find this curious as Asians were most adversely affected by race-based admission practices scrutinized by the Court. I don’t know why Asians would be less supportive of the decision unless they feared that expressing their support would somehow make them even more of a target?

Regardless, this is good news and it will only get better if we can root out DEI.

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There are 9 comments.

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  1. Susan Quinn Member
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I remember reading in Clarence Thomas’ book how Affirmative Action created a liability for him. People would assume that he hadn’t earned his place in the university, and afterwards, they were skeptical about the truth of his high qualifications. Other highly regarded black professionals have said the same: they wanted to be accepted on their own merit.

    • #1
  2. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I remember reading in Clarence Thomas’ book how Affirmative Action created a liability for him. People would assume that he hadn’t earned his place in the university, and afterwards, they were skeptical about the truth of his high qualifications. Other highly regarded black professionals have said the same: they wanted to be accepted on their own merit.

    I don’t know if Doctor Ben Carson has said anything specifically but my information sources over a long period of time tell me this has had a negative effect on black medical practitioners for a long time.

    Now, of course, more recent actions a la Covid pandemic has smoothed this out so that the distrust applies across all medical institutions and personnel.

    • #2
  3. Kevin Schulte Member
    Kevin Schulte
    @KevinSchulte

    So. 48 % of blacks are of a …YOU owe me variety . 

    This is not good. 

    Thank God for the 52 %. Lots of work to be done to undo the corrupting of the left. 

    • #3
  4. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Kevin Schulte (View Comment):

    So. 48 % of blacks are of a …YOU owe me variety .

    This is not good.

    Thank God for the 52 %. Lots of work to be done to undo the corrupting of the left.

    Happily I don’t think that is the total composition of the 48%. As Scott Adams points out, pretty regularly 25% of poll responders are idiots. (That explains why 28% of whites thought the Court decision was bad. ) So you focus on the remainder to see the real distribution. That makes “thinking” support for decision even better. 

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  5. Comfortably Superannuated Inactive
    Comfortably Superannuated
    @OldDanRhody

    Rodin: The less hopeful aspect of the Axios report is that fewer Asians than Hispanics or Whites see the ban as good. I find this curious as Asians were most adversely affected by race-based admission practices scrutinized by the Court. I don’t know why Asians would be less supportive of the decision unless they feared that expressing their support would somehow make them even more of a target?

    Asia is big, and populated by many different peoples.  Lumping them all together isn’t very helpful.

    • #5
  6. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Comfortably Superannuated (View Comment):

    Rodin: The less hopeful aspect of the Axios report is that fewer Asians than Hispanics or Whites see the ban as good. I find this curious as Asians were most adversely affected by race-based admission practices scrutinized by the Court. I don’t know why Asians would be less supportive of the decision unless they feared that expressing their support would somehow make them even more of a target?

    Asia is big, and populated by many different peoples. Lumping them all together isn’t very helpful.

    Except for the fact that Harvard did. And so the question is was the poll Axios is reporting on sampled in the same manner that Harvard treated these groups.

    • #6
  7. Jim Kearney Member
    Jim Kearney
    @JimKearney

    Not expecting compensatory relief for all the whites elbowed out of jobs, ivy league admissions, promotions, etc. by the “historic injustices” of affirmative action since its institution in the 1960s. 

    That would be even more unlikely than a proposal I once heard in the late 1970s from 1960s counterculture survivor: that President Carter should sign into law a Hippie Recovery Act to compensate victims of that era.

    • #7
  8. Old Bathos Member
    Old Bathos
    @OldBathos

    I am old enough to remember when we suddenly switched from the Sidney Poitier Assumption–civil rights would steadily unleash suppressed inner excellence and that any black professional must be good because he had to overcome additional burdens to the assumption that the black (accountant, lawyer, doctor, etc) assigned to me is probably the token and less qualified.   Affirmative action is entirely to blame for that switch.

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  9. Chuck Coolidge
    Chuck
    @Chuckles

    OK, so why do the thinking group of the 48% believe that banning race-based admissions is bad?  (There’s lots of links in that Axios article.)  And for what percentage is @kevinschulte correct?

    • #9
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